Re: Grandson's request for advice   
How about a personal finance book, finance is not just about buying stocks. For someone younger I'd suggest- I Will Teach You To Be Rich by Ramit Sethi
It sounds like a scam but its not, its written for millennials in mind even though its been out for a few years, it's still relevant and easy to read. Talks about budgeting, saving, investing, paying off debt ect. May be worth a read especially for someone who doesn't grasp finance, it lays out a 6 week plan to get you on the right path.
          Para los “millennials”, buenas y malas noticias en el proyecto de salud del Senado    
Darlin Kpangbah recibe seguro de salud gratuito a través del Medicaid y está agradecida por la cobertura en caso de accidentes, como cuando se rasgó un ligamento de la pierna hace unos años.
          Comment on TLS #225: How to sync your heart + brain waves for more healing, alignment & less stress with Howard Martin by Colene E   
I teach workshops to companies on lots of topics, but one of my favorites is generational differences in the workplace. One of the things that I love to talk about is the dynamics between Baby Boomers and Millennials. In some research Millennials are called "echo boomers". They have so much in common in life experiences and events that were happening during their formative years (war, culture shifts, perspectives, etc.). It makes complete sense to me the Howard would feel a deep connection with millennials and vice-versa.
          How millennials are changing the shopping landscape   

The economic power of the millennial generation is growing, and that means marketers are selling to a whole new generation of shoppers who have dramatically changed the buying landscape.

The post How millennials are changing the shopping landscape appeared first on Holy Kaw!.


          Last Train to Paris (Deluxe Edition)   
DIDDY - DIRTY MONEY: Last Train to Paris

We're abroad on tour when I meet her, the woman of my dreams. We spend the night together, but I never get her name. When I wake up, she's gone.

I'm infatuated with her, really blown away. A couple of months go by, and I bump into her again on tour overseas. We get together, and we're inseparable for three months. We go to New York, Miami, all the places where I get it poppin'.

Then, suddenly, we have a misunderstanding and she just breaks out on me. But absence makes the heart grow fonder. We're in two different parts of the world and she's remembering all the good times while I'm thinking if I had another chance I wouldn't lose her again. One night in London, I get offstage at 9:45pm and I hear that she's in Paris. It's one of the foggiest nights, so I can't take my plane, I can't drive. The only way I can get to her is the last train to Paris...

This episode, inspired by a real-life encounter from his past, is the starting point of the new album Last Train to Paris by the Sean "Puffy" Combs' new group Diddy-Dirty Money. With dark, atmospheric beats and a cinematic back story, the new project represents an entirely new side of the rap impresario. Fans may think they know him, but as he prepares to unleash his latest smash, they are about to experience an entirely new Combs, and an entirely new sound. Diddy-Dirty Money is about to redefine dance music for the new decade.

Europe didn't just provide an evocative backdrop for the story that is Last Train to Paris, it also inspired the sound. Though Combs is known for his contribution to hip hop, he is also a passionate fan of dance music, often traveling to global hot spots like Ibiza and Berlin to take in the new sounds emerging from the techno scene. Blending elements of UK grime, Mediterranean techno and the 808s of American hip hop, the album represents a new sound that Combs calls "train music."

No stranger to the finer things, Combs amassed a crew of some of the top names in music to help him bring his vision to life. TI, Rick Ross and Lil Wayne all lend guest vocals, but the biggest contribution comes from band members Dawn Richard and Kalenna. "Dawn and I aren't background singers simply standing next to Diddy," says Kalenna. "Diddy-Dirty Money isn't just more of the same. It's an organic group that grew out of a shared passion for music."

Kalenna started writing songs at 11, when she would accompany her father--a rapper and army man--into the studio. As a military daughter, she moved often, living in diverse locations including Alaska, Germany and Hawaii. In music, she found a home for herself even as "home" was constantly changing. "Growing up, I understood how music can take you away and help you escape," she says. "At the same time I began learning how music brings people together; how it can heal and comfort." She eventually channeled her talent for songwriting into a successful career penning hits for Jill Scott, Jennifer Lopez, Timbaland and multi-platinum producer Rodney Jerkins.

Dawn Richard will be recognizable to fans as a member of the group Danity Kane, formed via the MTV series Making the Band 3. The New Orleans native grew up watching her father perform. A musician, choir director and former member of R&B group Chocolate Milk, he instilled in her a love of music, even as her tastes evolved. "I was more into alternative music," she says, naming influences including The Cranberries, Sheryl Crow and Green Day. "I saw myself as the leader of a rock band with pink hair, singing the music I love."

When Combs paired Richard and Kalenna together to write songs for Danity Kane in 2009, he knew immediately that he had a powerful new songwriting team, describing them as "kindred spirits." With so many far-reaching influences between them, combining forces as Dirty Money is nothing less than "divine intervention," says Richard. "We mirror each other. We're all perfectionists with a strong work ethic. We push and challenge each other."

The trio's unmatched creative chemistry reveals itself in the latest blockbuster single "Hello Good Morning". The group premiered the single in front of 25 million viewers on American Idol on March 31st. The high-energy track, with its urgent, atmospheric beats, was perfectly suited to an explosive performance with spectacular special effects. Idol producers even issued a warning to viewers about the intense strobe lights used onstage.

Ross, who also lent vocals to the lead single "Angels", is just another member of the extended Dirty Money family. Lil Wayne was passionate about the new sound being crafted, and dropped verses on "Strobe Lights", a teasing, funky club banger, and "Shades", a trippy track also featuring Bilal. Mario Winans produced the 80s-influenced "Give My All To You" while Rodney Jerkins produced the international party jam "I Want Your Love".

"I'll even take off my shades," sings (yes, sings) Combs on "Twisted", hinting at a new, emotional core to his sound. The multilayered track represents some of the many influences of Last Train. With a soaring synth riff that reflects the head-trip that is falling in love, he recalls a post-millennial Prince. Other tracks veer from tribal drums to church organs to gritty instrumentals, all combining to form the new sound.

While Combs has had unsurpassed success in many different realms, from fashion to spirits to film, the lush soundscape of Last Train represents a renewed commitment to music from the multitalented impresario. By opening up a chapter of his own life to tell the story, he's crafted an album that is expressive and exciting. Sure, this album will make you dance, but Dirty Money is more than just dance music. It's a movement.


          New App Bridges Gap Between News and Social Media   
(NewsUSA) - We live in a digital world that is constantly evolving. Those of us who were born prior to the dot-com bubble were able to witness firsthand how technology transformed the way we lived our day-to-day lives. Then, in the early 2000s, the rise of social media forever changed how we interact with one another. Entire industries were forced to adapt to this new era. There is one industry that is still in the early days of its evolution: the news industry.A recent poll by the American Press Institute revealed that 85 percent of millennials say keeping up with the news is important to them. With growing millennial interest and the recent increase in digital news consumption, it's no surprise that some of the biggest social media companies are trying to break into the news industry.This new frontier of digital media has companies like Facebook, Snapchat and Twitter racing to apply the news to their existing platforms. The truth is, the news needs a platform of its own.Enter Rantt, the social network for news. This startup aims to inform and inspire the masses.Zak Ali, co-founder and CEO, believes the recent surge of people engaging with the news online has created a new genre: social news."When you read a story that truly impacts you, one that you can't ignore, you feel the need to interact with it," he said.Backing Ali's assertion is a Pew Research poll that found 46 percent of people active on social networks have discussed a news-related issue or event. The problem, Ali said, is that the scattered nature of the Internet forces people to navigate among many different sources to read credible news stories and to share their opinions."Too often will you see really well thought-out posts buried beneath a mountain of unrelated content. Your voice matters. You shouldn't feel like a bystander while reading the news. On Rantt, you don't have to," Ali said.Rantt delivers the latest news from top news sources. By tailoring the feed to your interests, Rantt aims to provide only the content that's important to you. Not only can you discover news stories, you are encouraged to speak about them and publish pieces of your own."With Rantt," Ali said, "you aren't just reading the news...you are becoming a part of it."For more information, visit www.rantt.com to download the app from the Apple App Store.
          13734: AT&T Directs Diversity.    

Adweek reported on a new AT&T diversity-mentor program that connects young filmmakers with celebrity talent—including Octavia Spencer and Common. Gee, it’s odd that the telecommunications company didn’t tap acclaimed director Milana Vayntrub for the project.

AT&T Is Pairing Young Filmmakers With Celebrity Mentors to Bring Diverse Voices to the Screen

Hello Lab’s new program supports rising talent

By Sami Main

AT&T’s Hello Lab, a millennial and Gen Z-driven content studio, frequently partners with YouTube creators to help them produce out-of-the-box projects that just happen to be sponsored by AT&T.

The studio announced today a new program that will partner young filmmakers with award-winning professionals from the industry to help them create the project of their dreams.

AT&T refers to this as a diversity-focused initiative as it deals with issues and narratives from people of color, the LGBTQ community and women. Each young filmmaker will be paired with a mentor and an entire team of advisers like studio and production company executives, agents and attorneys.

Academy Award winners Octavia Spencer and Common are two of the mentors this year, along with Rick Famuyiwa, Desiree Akhavan and Nina Yang Bongiovi.

“There are a lot of film programs out there designed to empower young filmmakers,” said Octavia Spencer, in the press release for the announcement. “But the word ‘empower’ is a sort of a catch-all, isn’t it? What I love about this program is that it’s tactical. It’s enabling young filmmakers to make actual, physical work. It’s giving them the first crucial part of their reel.”

Spencer is mentoring Gabrielle Shepard with Mike Jackson, a partner at John Legend’s Get Lifted Film Co.

The five filmmakers in the program will debut their short films on DirecTV Now in the fourth quarter of 2017; AT&T’s Hello Lab will help the young group create high-quality work, and the support team will provide help with pitching their work, managing budgets and directing character-driven narratives.

“I wanted to be a part of this program because opportunity is everything. Connecting with young filmmakers, such as Nefertite Nguvu, is an honor,” said Common. “It’s the young and gifted visionaries who take the arts to levels we haven’t seen.”

Common will mentor Nguvu with Shelby Stone, the president of production at his company Freedom Road Productions.

“I am blessed to have the career that I do, and hope to be able to support and inspire her artistic vision and goals through the AT&T Hello Lab Mentorship Program,” he said.

“Nurturing the next generation of creative minds is crucial for the entertainment industry,” said Valerie Vargas, svp of advertising and Creator Lab for AT&T. “The AT&T Hello Lab Mentorship Program gives voice to filmmakers that may otherwise be silenced, and we can’t wait to see the ideas this unique group of creators develop.”

          Skull Session: Buckeyes Intern, Mark Dantonio Researches Millennials, and Purdue Made a Good Hire Now What   
Jerome Baker returns the July 1 2017 Skull Session

Today's dispatch hails from the sandy banks of the Ohio River in the Derby City, baby! Looking to drink bourbon, gamble on ponies, and not pass out at 3:30 a.m. in a bar that's open 'til 4 for some reason.

Any Cardinal or Wildcat fans are free to meet me outside the KFC Yum! Center this afternoon for an ass kicking. (That includes you too, Rick Pitino! A video of a weeping, purple-faced Pitino hollering "Uncle!" would do over a million views.)

I'll be the transient-lookin' fella in full Buckeye regalia dual-wielding bottles of cheap Everclear with a freaked Black & Mild dangling from my lips.

Until then, let's watch Billy Price bulldoze a Michigan Man.

From NFL.com's Lance Zierlein (turn sound on for analysis):

ICYMI:

Word of the Day: Cairn.

 MEET THE INTERNS. All elite football programs preach the importance of academics in recruiting. For some schools, though, talk is all it ever amounts to.

Not at Ohio State, where Urban Meyer has spearheaded "Real Life Wednesdays," a program which has turned into a massive tool on the recruiting trail. 

On top of that, Meyer's program works with corporations and institutions to land career-defining institutions for the leaders of his team.

From Urban Meyer's Twitter account, Chris Worley shooting the Memorial Tournament with 10TV:

Chris Worley at 10TV
Chris Worley at 10TV.

Billy Price and the world's smallest couch: 

Billy Price at Mast Global
Billy Price at Mast Global.

Looks like Tyquan Lewis plans to terrorize criminals when he retires from terrorizing quarterbacks:

Tyquan Lewis, FBI
Tyquan Lewis at the FBI.

Meet future Nike CEO Terry McLaurin, who's coaching at the The Opening Finals in Beaverton, Oregon: 

Terry McLaurin at Nike
Terry McLaurin at Nike

Stuff like this won't get the #clicks compared to an article on Dublin police apprehending two rogue pissers, but they help keep the hot #take artists from putting Ohio State football into their trash articles. So that's nice.

 THE MILLENNIAL QUESTION. If some Baby Boomers had their way, America would only use Millennials to harvest their blood.

Michigan State coach Mike D'antoni Mark Dantonio doesn't have that option, for at least a few more years. He needs that Millennial life-force to pad his bank account with an extra ~4.3 million dollars this fall.

Thankfully for Spartan fans, Dantonio understands an entire generation now thanks to a 15 minute video he saw on the internet.

From footballscoop.com:

Earlier this year, I was sitting in on a speaking session featuring Michigan State head coach Mark Dantonio. If memory serves me right, it was at the AFCA convention in Nashville where he was on a panel of coaches talking about discipline, or perhaps it was at the annual Michigan HS Coaches association convention.

In either instance, I distinctly remember him saying that everyone who works with millennials (widely defined as people born in 1984 or after) needs to Google “Millennial video” and watch it. I remember jotting it down at the time, along with a number of other things he said, with the intention of tracking down that video later. I knew I had seen the video Dantonio was referring to before, and noted that it was a message that should be shared with all coaches, since we’re all working with (and some of us are members of) the millennial generation.

With out further ado, the video in question:

I would like to thank this guy for giving me an excuse next time Whitney chastises me for checking Slack while at dinner.

Baby, blogging about the local team is an addiction, which is a synonym for disease. You wouldn't tut tut somebody for taking cancer medications at the dinner table, right? Exactly.

 BOILER UP? Don't look now, but Purdue is on the ascension in that it convinced a Western Kentucky coach a move to West Lafayette would be a promotion.

Enter former XFL quarterback Jeff Brohm, who inherits the smoking remains of the Darrell Hazell era. 

From Bill Connelly of sbnation.com:

Brohm doesn’t inherit a senior-heavy squad. That’s a plus. Granted, seniors could make up about half of the defense, but the odds are good that whoever emerges will return in 2018.

This might not be a full-fledged Year Zero situation, in which the smartest thing to do is strip the house to the studs and start over. Brohm might be able to get mileage out of Blough and some new skill guys, and maybe there’s enough in the defensive front seven to keep the Boilers in games.

Still, the schedule doesn’t include many likely wins, even for a slightly improved team. The Boilermakers will probably beat Ohio and could hope to split tossup games against Rutgers and Illinois and maybe steal an upset against a Missouri or Minnesota or Nebraska or Indiana. But 2017 will be mostly about planting seeds.

I would say it'd be hilarious to see the Boilermakers raise hell in the West, but I still haven't recovered from that hangover I suffered on Iuka Avenue in October 2009 while watching Terrelle Pryor turn the ball over five times in West Lafayette. I hope they lose every game this year.

 HOLTMANN CLEANING HOUSE? Not even a month on the job and new Ohio State basketball coach Chris Holtmann has already signed one new player and seen two of Thad Matta's recruits leave town.

It seems like he's pretty efficiently getting his guys in and the old guys out, which is exactly how Holtmann does it, claims Max Landis, Holtmann's first-ever recruit.

Holtmann's not going to have to wait long to fill his team with his own recruits. After next season, he'll have seven open scholarships to fill however his heart desires.

 BOUT DAMN TIME. Breaking news: The NCAA is considering doing something humane and just for the student-athletes it claims to look out for.

From vice.com (via 11W member Hetuck):

When it comes to college athlete transfers, the National Collegiate Athletic Association may be on the cusp of—finally—doing something right. Earlier this week, the Division I Council Transfer Working Group announced that it's considering altering current rules that limit the ability of players to move from one school to another. The most notable rules up for consideration include those:

  • Requiring athletes to get permission from their current schools to speak with other schools;
  • Barring those athletes from receiving a scholarship from their new school without first getting said permission.

Changes to both rules—and by changes, I mean scrapping them completely—are long overdue. As is, they are arbitrary, capricious, and philosophically absurd, giving coaches and athletic departments undue, unearned power over unpaid students seeking a better situation elsewhere.

Shame it will come to late to help Antwuan Jackson this cycle, though.

 THOSE WMDs. 10-year-old's penpal: General Manuel Noriega... Netflix now helping cops solve cold cases... The man who spent 35 years in prison without trial... The cryptocurrency prophet.


          How to Build a Robo Advisor: Advice for Starting a Robo Advisory   

MyPrivateBanking Robo AdvisorWith the tremendous growth in robo advisor assets under management (AUM), financial institutions are scrambling to figure out how to build and become a robo advisor.

Starting a robo advisor service combines financially savvy with big data analytics, as well as a comprehensive understanding to how robo advisors work.

How Do Robo Advisors Work?

Robo advisors are platforms that leverage algorithms to handle users' investment platforms. These services analyze each customer's current financial status, risk aversion, and goals. From here, they recommend the best portfolio of stocks available based on that data.

And these automated financial services are poised to transform the tremendous worldwide wealth management industry. 

MyPrivateBanking's report, Robo Advisor 3.0, takes an in-depth look at the basic challenge of every robo advisor: how to craft a presence that succeeds in convincing website visitors to sign up as investors and then remain on board.

In this data-driven assessment, the report looks at the characteristics, business models, and strengths and weaknesses of the top robo advisors around the world. The research was conducted on a total of 76 active robo advisors worldwide - 29 in the U.S. and Canada, 38 in seven European countries and nine in the Asia-Pacific region. We've compiled a full list of robo advisors analyzed below.

The exhaustive report provides comprehensive answers and data on how to optimize the individual onboarding stages (How it works, Client Assessment, Client Onboarding, Communication and Portfolio Reporting) and details five best practices for each stage. Furthermore, the report provides strategies to appeal to different segments such as Millennials, baby boomer investors approaching retirement, and high net worth individuals (HNWIs), and analyzes the impact of new technologies.

The report provides comprehensive analysis and data-driven insights on how to utilize robo advisors to win and keep clients:

  • What a robo advisor platform should offer to successfully convert prospects into happy clients.
  • Which robo advisor features work and why.
  • What are best practices for the different stages in the digital customer journey.
  • How long clients need to onboard on the surveyed robo advisors and which specialized offers are given.
  • What the client assessment process should include 
  • How client communication should be (inbound for customer service and outbound for news, education and commentary).
  • What good portfolio reporting looks like, so that it meets the information needs of the customer.
  • How B2B providers are positioned in the development of robo advisory services and what they offer.
  • How robo advisors should adopt their strategies to appeal to different segments such as Millennials, baby boomer investors approaching retirement, and high net worth individuals (HNWIs).
  • Which robo advisors provide specialized options such as micro-investing, rewards schemes or hedging strategies, and in what manner.
  • What the impacts of new technologies are, such as the use of artificial intelligence for client interaction and narrative generation on the robo advisor model.
  • How the future of digital success will look for robo advisors.
  • Appendix containing data on the web presences of more than 70 robo advisors alongside the digital customer journey process.
  • And much more.

>> Click here for Report Summary, Table of Contents, Methodology <<

Analyzed robo advisors in this report include:

North America: Acorns, Asset Builder, Betterment, Blooom, Bicycle Financial, BMO SmartFolio, Capital One Investing, Financial Guard, Flexscore, Future Advisor, Guide Financial, Hedgeable, iQuantifi, Jemstep, Learnvest, Liftoff, Nest Wealth, Personal Capital, Rebalance IRA, Schwab Intelligent Portfolios, SheCapital, SigFig, TradeKing Advisors, Universis, Wealthbar, Wealthfront, Wealthsimple, Wela, Wisebanyan 

Europe: AdviseOnly, Advize, comdirect, Easyfolio, EasyVest, ETFmatic, Fairr.de, FeelCapital, Fiver a Day, Fundshop.fr, GinMon, Investomat, KeyPlan, KeyPrivate, Liqid, Marie Quantier, Money on Toast, MoneyFarm, Nutmeg, Parmenion, Quirion, rplan, Scalable Capital, Simply EQ, Sutor Bank, Swanest, SwissQuote ePrivateBanking, True Potential Investor, True Wealth, Vaamo, VZ Finanz Portal, Wealth Horizon, Wealthify, WeSave, Whitebox, Yellow Advice, Yomoni, Zen Assets.

Asia-Pacific: 8 Now!, Ignition Direct & Ignition Wealth, InvestSMART, Mizuho Bank Smart Folio, Movo, Owners Advisory, QuietGrowth, ScripBox, StockSpot

Here's how you get this exclusive Robo Advisor research:MyPrivateBanking Report Spread

To provide you with this exclusive report, MyPrivateBanking has partnered with BI Intelligence, Business Insider's premium research service, to create The Complete Robo Advisor Research Collection.

If you’re involved in the financial services industry at any level, you simply must understand the paradigm shift caused by robo advisors.

Investors frustrated by mediocre investment performance, high wealth manager fees and deceptive sales techniques are signing up for automated investment accounts at a record pace.

And the robo advisor field is evolving right before our eyes. Firms are figuring out on the fly how to best attract, service and upsell their customers. What lessons are they learning? Who’s doing it best? What threats are traditional wealth managers facing? Where are the opportunities for exponential growth for firms with robo advisor products or models?

The Complete Robo Advisor Research Collection is the ONLY resource that answers all of these questions and more. Click here to learn more about everything that's included in this exclusive research bundle

Join the conversation about this story »

NOW WATCH: Warren Buffett lives in a modest house that's worth .001% of his total wealth — here's what it looks like


          Bitcoin's 'bubble' is unlike anything we've ever seen   

There are still some question marks about whether bitcoin is in a bubble. But the speed of its price growth is already nearly unmatched.

The cryptocurrency has surged 162% in very volatile trading this year amid continued demand. But as the chart below illustrates, bitcoin's longer-term rally by as much as 1,000% was swifter than homebuilder stocks in the lead up to the housing crash. 

Jeffrey Kleintop, the chief global investment strategist at Charles Schwab, said that "the 10-year buildup is important to how embedded the bubble becomes and how much impact the bursting has on the economy and markets."

In other words, this is simply unprecedented. But arguably, a bitcoin crash probably won't have the same ripple effect on the economy as some other assets would. 

Billionaire Marc Cuban is among those who have said bitcoin prices are in a bubble. "When everyone is bragging about how easy they are making $=bubble," he tweeted

Ethereum, another cryptocurrency, is up by more than 3,000% this year

 

SEE ALSO: Millennials are flocking towards some of the most speculative ways to invest

DON'T MISS: PRESENTING: The most important charts in the world from the brightest minds on Wall Street

Join the conversation about this story »

NOW WATCH: An economist explains what could happen if Trump pulls the US out of NAFTA


          These are the 11 biggest hedge funds in the world   

ray-dalio

2016 was a tough year for hedge funds. 

The industry as a whole only delivered a 5.4% return for clients, well below the S&P 500's return of 11.9%, according to data from eVestment.

Poor performance and high fees drove money out of the money managers' funds, with about $70 billion pulled out of the funds last year, the biggest drop since 2009, according to data tracker HFR.

But not all firms saw their funds shrink, according to Institutional Investor's Alpha's recently released 2017 Hedge Fund 100 list. The annual list, which ranks the world's largest hedge funds by assets, shows that many of the top funds' assets have grown by double digits. 

Ray Dalio's Bridgewater Associates, a Connecticut-based firm with $122 billion in hedge fund assets under management, took the top spot on the list. Its hedge fund AuM at the beginning of 2017 were up about 17% from the same time last year. 

The funds that witnessed the most impressive growth, according to the list, were so-called quant funds. Such funds rely on algorithms or computer programs to guide their investing. Renaissance Technologies, one of the best known and oldest quant firms, saw its assets balloon by 42%, year-over-year. It moved up to the fourth spot on the list, up from twelfth last year. 

Two Sigma, another quant fund, snagged a higher spot on the list. Its assets under management are up 28% from last year. 

Here are the top 11 funds by hedge fund assets, according to the full list. 

SEE ALSO: Millennials are about to benefit from 'one of the largest intergenerational wealth transfers in history'

11. Elliott Management - $31.3 billion



10. Winton Group - $32 billion



9. Och-Ziff Capital Management - $33.5 billion



See the rest of the story at Business Insider

          3 Powerful Ways to Link Your Business to a Social Cause   
Link Your Business to a Social Cause

70% of millennials claim they would spend more money with brands that support causes they care about. As a result, social responsibility has become a priority for many brands. Here's how to support a social cause that matters to you.

The post 3 Powerful Ways to Link Your Business to a Social Cause appeared first on Cision.


          North Dakota Might be the Best State for Young Adults   
By Newsweek
For young adults looking for opportunity, there’s apparently no better place than North Dakota.  A wave of young people relocating to the state has put North Dakota at the top of a list of best states for young adults to live in 2017.

U.S. News released a list Tuesday of the top 10 states millennials are moving to, and echoing its number one ranking as the best state for economic growth, North Dakota was also named the best place for young adults. The state saw a 5.08 percent growth in the number of residents age 25 to 29 between 2012 and 2015, compared to the national average growth rate of 1.61 percent.

Along with Microsoft’s second largest campus in Fargo, the oil and natural gas industry has led to a surge of job opportunities. 

North Dakota has also become known for its affordable tuition rates—an appealing situation for younger adults looking to further their education. Housing and the general cost of living are also relatively cheap, especially compared to other young-people Meccas like New York or Seattle.

The latest U.S. News analysis is in line with a recent MoneyRates.com report that said millennials were flocking to North Dakota, at least in part because of ample job opportunities. North Dakota had an unemployment rate of just 2.9 percent as of February. (Currently, New Mexico has the highest unemployment rate of 6.8 percent, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics.)

"Last check, we had 12,000 open positions across the state,'' Sandy McMerty, co-deputy commissioner for the North Dakota Department of Commerce, told U.S. News. "We're at a place where we really need that out-of-state population to come in."

From 2011 to 2015, more than 80,000 jobs were created in the state.

“[North Dakota is like] a growing and robust town that’s slowly turning into a fast city,” Mason Wenzel, North Dakota State University’s executive commissioner of finance, told KVRR News. “It’s the future.”

Second to North Dakota in attracting young people was Rhode Island, which saw 4.38 percent growth of young adults moving to the state between 2012 and 2015.

North Dakota Might be the Best State for Young Adults - Newsweek

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          North Dakota Only State to Continue to Grow Younger According to U.S. Census Bureau   
By ND Commerce
North Dakota is the only state in the nation that continued to grow younger in 2015, according to estimates released today by the U.S. Census Bureau. North Dakota was the only state to decline their median age from 34.9 to 34.6 between July 1, 2014, and July 1, 2015.
 
“North Dakota continues to be the fourth youngest state in the nation,” said Kevin Iverson, manager of the North Dakota Census Office. “Overall, 40 counties have seen a reduction in median age between July 2014 and 2015 with an additional four seeing no change.”
 
Maine had the highest median age at 44.5 years, and Utah had the lowest at 30.7 years. Only Utah, Alaska (33.8) and Texas (34.3) were estimated to be younger than North Dakota.
 
North Dakota’s low unemployment rate, 2.8% as of May 2016, and availability of over 15,400 open positions in the state continues to attract youth to the state. North Dakota has the highest portion of young adults, with 9.6 percent of the state’s population being 20 to 24 years old, the highest rate in the country.
 
MoneyRates.com recently named North Dakota as the best state for millennials based on factors including unemployment rates, affordability of housing, and access to entertainment and broadband.
 
The North Dakota Department of Commerce works to improve the quality of life for North Dakota citizens by leading efforts to attract, retain and expand wealth. Commerce serves businesses and communities statewide through committed people and partners who offer valuable programs and dynamic services.
 
For more North Dakota news and information go to www.NDCommerce.com.

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          North Dakota the Best Place for Millennials, Financial Site Says   
By InForum
Forget the coasts, young folks. The Midwest is where it's at if you're a millennial, new research finds.

North Dakota is the best state for millennials, with South Dakota the runner-up, according to research by MoneyRates.com, a site that provides banking information for consumers.

The site examined eight criteria, including unemployment rates, rental rates, night life and access to broadband internet.

North Dakota was tops in broadband access, and in the top 10 for rental affordability and concentration of places to spend a fun night out, the site found.

The state has a high proportion of young adults, with 10.49 percent of the state's population being 20 to 24 years old, the third-highest rate in the country, MoneyRates said.

Rounding out the top five states were Nebraska, Iowa and Montana.

It's a notion that goes against the stereotype of where a young person might want to live. The West Coast fared badly, with Washington state as the worst and California as the fourth-worst state for millennials, the site said. Virginia and Arizona tied for second worst and Vermont came in fifth.

Millennials make up an age group born ranging from the early 1980s to around 2000.

The site also found North Dakota had the lowest unemployment rate for people ages 20-24 at 4.6 percent, compared to 10.7 for an average state in the nation.

Best and worst

Best states for millennials
• North Dakota
• South Dakota
• Nebraska
• Iowa
• Montana
• Louisiana
• Indiana
• Kansas
• Wyoming
• Texas

Worst states for millennials
• Washington
• Virginia (tied for 2nd)
• Arizona (tied for 2nd)
• California
• Vermont
• New Hampshire
• Oregon
• Maine
• Delaware
• Kentucky

North Dakota the Best Place for Millennials, Financial Site Says - Inforum.com

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          Inside Fargo, America's Most Undervalued Tech Hub   
By Fortune
Editor's Note: Congratulations to the many Fargo-area businesses mentioned in this article. Many of them have participate in ND Commerce programs such as Innovate ND, Centers of Excellence and Centers of Research Excellence, Research ND and the North Dakota Development Fund.

It gets 50 inches of snow a year and is so cold that its bikeshare moves inside for the winter. But its homegrown tech community is on fire.

The morning of Nov. 12, 2014 was well below freezing in Fargo, the largest city in North Dakota. By the time Shawn Muehler took the stage before an audience of 150, the theater, located just a few blocks west of the Red River, had warmed up. Entrepreneurs, students, professors and business leaders shuffled down the aisles with free cups of coffee. For the audience, it was time for Fargo’s 1 Million Cups, a robust startup community-building initiative from the Kaufman Foundation that’s a kind of church for entrepreneurs. For Muehler, it was time to talk about drones.

Standing on stage with one of his drones, Muehler—a Fargo native, Air Force officer, and seasoned pilot—had six minutes to present his business idea, the result of several months of white-board calculating, late-night brainstorming, and endless code tinkering. He described the collision risks found in an airspace that is increasingly crowded with aircraft and drones. The software that he and his small team of pilots, developers, and engineers wanted to build, he explained, would create a safety net for drone pilots, enabling them to track their unmanned vehicles in real time using existing cellular networks.

Muehler’s presentation was followed by vigorous applause and a round of questions. As is tradition at 1 Million Cups, the entrepreneur was asked one final query: “How can we as a community help you succeed?” And so he answered. Within five days, Muehler tells Fortune, he had five funding opportunities from people in the community. The ensuing $500,000 seed investment allowed him to double his workforce and move to a larger office downtown.

Last spring the company, now called Botlink, launched the beta version of its drone-tracking application, which it says is the world’s first commercially available drone safety and control platform. In June, Botlink announced a joint venture with Fargo’s power management company, Packet Digital, to raise $15 million on the same day that it co-hosted Fargo’s inaugural Drone Focus Conference. By this fall, the company had launched its first product: a piece of data-processing hardware that’s compatible with every drone on the market.

When I visited the Botlink office in September, the staff had just returned from a drone conference in Las Vegas where they’d run out of brochures the first day and flummoxed some West Coast startups who didn’t realize they had competitors in Fargo. Half-empty containers of drones now littered the floor around the reception desk, making the office look like the home of a robot family unpacking from a long trip. In the workshop down the hall, a plane with a 14-foot wingspan sat on a desk, and Muehler, wearing a Batman t-shirt, was one of the first to tell me what makes Fargo special.

Well before I arrived in Fargo, I’d heard about Silicon Prairie—the Heartland’s version of Silicon Valley—with noteworthy startup activity in larger cities like Omaha, Des Moines, and Kansas City. I knew Fargo was on the eastern border of the state, far from the oil activity in the Bakken region. I’d read that it’s home to the country’s third-largest Microsoft  MSFT 0.65% campus and nearly 30,000 college students. The average age of Fargo residents is 31. Its unemployment rate is among the lowest in the nation. I had already grasped enough about this city of 105,000 to easily dismiss the Siberia-esque picture painted in the 1996 Coen brothers film of the same name. I envisioned a burst of Technicolor popping from a vast expanse of plains.

The tech scene that I visited in September was markedly different from the one I had first heard about in 2013. Two years ago Emerging Prairie, a startup news and events organization, was beginning to establish itself; today it co-organizes wildly popular events such as 1 Million Cups, TEDxFargo, and a monthly gathering called Startup Drinks. Thanks to local startup Myriad Mobile, which spun out of a student-run incubator, Fargo has begun hosting the annual Midwest Mobile Summit. A nonprofit has started offering coding classes for women. Meetups have launched for hackers, gamers, developers, geeks, and even bitcoin enthusiasts.

Fargo companies are also beginning to appear in the national spotlight. Intelligent InSites, which provides tracking real-time operational intelligence for the healthcare industry, is experiencing explosive growth. So is Appareo Systems, a leader in electronic and computer products for the aerospace and defense industries. A handful of gaming companies have surfaced in the area; one is developing a virtual reality horror game and another is building a woodland survival adventure game called On My Ownfor Xbox One. A team from North Dakota State University has engineered an affordable, 3D-printed prosthetic arm. Two locals have started a funeral webcasting service. Another startup has developed an autonomous tractor.

With all of this activity, how does a place like Fargo end up as one of the most undervalued, overlooked tech communities in the United States? That’s why I wanted to meet Greg Tehven, the executive director and co-founder of Emerging Prairie and affectionately known as Fargo’s ambassador, when I visited the city this fall. On a warm Sunday afternoon, I found him at a community lunch for new Americans, set up for several hundred on a basketball court on the west side of town. Characteristic of the region, the wind blew like it was trying to prove something; strong guests sent naan cartwheeling across curry vegetables and off paper plates. Young Bhutanese girls danced barefoot on the asphalt in sequined dresses the color of Gerber daisies.

Tehven is a soft-spoken, dyed-in-the-wool millennial, a fifth-generation Fargoian who grew up on a farm and came of age during the Buffalo Commons era, when people debated a proposal to let buffalo take over the Great Plains. Tehven left Fargo for college, wandered around, felt unfulfilled and returned, determined to build the type of community he wanted to call home. Today, he travels around the country speaking about community-building and teaches social entrepreneurship in India.

“Barriers are being eliminated to contribute to the community here,” he told me. “People who have moved away know they can come back here and do things quickly.” He talked about a radically inclusive culture that has an extraordinary speed of trust. In economic terms, what’s happening in Fargo is that a magnetic downtown is attracting and retaining talent. But Tehven contends that it’s really about love.

“It’s about increasing the amount of love in our community,” he said, noting that it’s hard to be successful on your own. “There’s a co-dependence here.” He said people need each other, whether it’s for harvesting crops or recovering from a flood. If emotional support is absent, innovation will falter.

The next morning, I met Tehven at Prairie Den, a new coworking space in the center of town, above a Chinese restaurant called King House Buffet. Until this summer, it was run by Minneapolis-based CoCo, but they didn’t last a year, Tehven said, because they didn’t embrace the philosophy of giving before getting. Shortly after they left, the space was resurrected as the Den, a funky, art-filled workspace that’s home to Emerging Prairie and a couple start-ups. Hearing the story of this rebirth made me think of the new growth that quickly emerges in forests after controlled burns.

One of the reasons Emerging Prairie was created was to act as a publicity machine for locals who think it’s uncouth to celebrate one’s own achievements. The organization, which is in the process of becoming a nonprofit, now has a staff of four, including a writer, Marisa Jackels, who produces daily stories about the startup scene. She never runs out of content. Tehven has each new staff member read Startup Communities: Building an Entrepreneurial Ecosystem in Your City by Foundry Group co-founder Brad Feld.

If Fargo had to limit itself to a single story, it would be that of Great Plains Software, a fledgling startup built by North Dakotan Doug Burgum over nearly two decades and acquired by Microsoft in 2001 for $1.1 billion. Today, Microsoft is located on the south side of town and has grown to four buildings with more than 1,500 employees—the company’s third-largest campus in North America.

Burgum went on to found Kilbourne Group, a downtown redevelopment company, and co-found Arthur Ventures, a venture capital group that’s investing in software companies out of a $45 million fund raised in 2013. He’s as close to a godfather as the humble Fargo community will allow. Incidentally, it wasn’t until well after a conversation with a community leader named Joe—who started a downtown farmer’s market, worked on Uber-friendly legislation and is now building a giant mobile sauna—that I found out he was Burgum’s son.

Burgum said Great Plains employees focused on service and had a lot of humility and gratitude; he sees that today in the dozens of startups that employ Great Plains alumni. Like others, he told me that the region’s land and history play a role in today’s technology growth.

“Every farmer and rancher is an entrepreneur and tinkerer and inventor,” he said, “and there’s some of that DNA here. You wouldn’t have ended up here if you weren’t a risk-taker—moving your family from Sweden to a new land with no electricity and very little infrastructure.”

Shane Waslaski, president and CEO of Intelligent InSites, also grew up in the state and said the strong tech community in Fargo can be attributed to a pioneering spirit and an “altruistic desire to nourish each other.” Tenaciousness and perseverance are rooted in the heritage, he said.

From Prairie Den, Tehven and I walked around downtown, popping into offices and meetings unannounced and intercepting folks on Broadway and Roberts Street—as was his plan. I was reminded of the familiarity and ease with which students can have impromptu and rich conversations while walking across a college quad. Time and again, talking to Muehler and other entrepreneurs, I heard stories that made it easy to root for the underdog that is Fargo. I found a level of enthusiasm typically reserved for young political candidates offering hope and promising change. More than once, I saw someone get choked up talking about the place they call home.

We ran into Drew Spooner, a baby-faced serial entrepreneur who started the Hammock Initiative and speaks deadpan about the health benefits of swaying. He now has sponsors and a national following. Then we ran into the woman behind Unglued, a shop selling locally made crafts; and one of the brewers behind Fargo Brewing Company, which makes Wood Chipper India Pale Ale. Much of the day, Tehven, wearing jeans and flannel, walked around with a cup of coffee in his hand. He told me there’s a sense in Fargo that if you talk about something enough, it will become real—whether it’s a hammocking craze or a spontaneous tailgate party.

Among the challenges in a town with so much startup activity is making sure the entrepreneurs have enough support to get over the first-generation hump and maintain momentum even when the initial spotlight fades.

“In cities like San Francisco, Boston, New York, there’s a lot of experience and expertise,” said Miguel Danielson, another Emerging Prairie co-founder. “That’s great for entrepreneurs because it’s scary to do alone. So a lot of what we do at Emerging Prairie is try to bring these folks together.” He lovingly describes Fargo—remote, hundreds of miles from Minneapolis and Winnipeg—as a Gilligan’s Island of sorts. “You’re stuck with the folks you’ve got in the immediate vicinity, so you better be nice to them,” he said, adding that in a small place, he feels especially blessed when he finds others with common interests.

Danielson grew up in Fargo and left for college and Harvard Law School. If it weren’t for the startup culture—which is helping Midwestern communities fight brain drain–he may never have returned. After practicing in Cambridge for several years, he opened Danielson Legal in Fargo, specializing in technology law, and he created Fargo Startup House, where entrepreneurs can live for free.

In the next five years, Danielson predicts a more robust Fargo tech scene, with a few wild successes and some wild failures. When the city sees its first exit success story of this new era—someone who starts with nothing and ends up with hundreds of millions of dollars—he said that will be “one that looms in the minds of people forever.”

At the end of my day in Fargo, I returned to Prairie Den. Spooner was setting up hammocks for an evening event. An Emerging Prairie Tweet read, “We sway while we work.”

That night, I watched a video of Tehven’s TEDxFargo talk. He was speaking at the Fargo Civic Center in 2014, outside of which sits a stone slab with the Ten Commandments.

“The Coen brothers were wrong,” he told the audience. “It isn’t a place of barrenness. It isn’t a place of cold. It’s a place of the most amazing people in the world.”

The following week I had dinner back home with a friend who works in the technology industry, and I told him I thought he should move to Fargo. Yes, it’s a place that gets an average of 50 inches of snow a year, and it’s so cold that the bikeshare moves inside for the winter. But there’s a lot going on there, I told him. Shortly thereafter, I woke up from a dream in which I was on my way back to Fargo. In it, I was with someone—perhaps my tech friend—and felt a sense of urgency. Eager to find housing, I sped westward, not wanting to miss out.

Inside Fargo, America's Most Undervalued Tech Hub - Fortune.com

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          North Dakota Ranks #4 on Forbes Best States for Business and Careers List   
By ND Commerce
North Dakota ranks first is a number of areas in the Forbes Best States for Business and Careers list, including:
  • 1st - Job Growth (4.7% annually, twice as high as any other state)
  • 1st - Income Growth (3.6%)
  • 1st - Gross State Product Growth (8.6%)
  • 1st - Unemployment (3.2% average)
  • 1st - Net Migration (1.4%)
 “Our business friendly environment and efforts to diversify the economy are continuing to keep North Dakota growing strong,” Commerce Commissioner Al Anderson said. “This is a place that has great opportunity for business and career alike.”

North Dakota ranks 4th overall in the list. The state ranked 3rd in economic climate and had the most robust economy in the nation in the past five-years.

The Forbes ranking factored in 40 data points across six main areas: business costs (weighted most heavily), labor supply, regulatory environment, economic climate, growth prospects and quality of life. Forbes added several new criteria this year, including the number of millennials as a percent of the population.
 
“It is an opportunity to showcase the types of resources and opportunities we can offer," Anderson said. “Rankings of this nature draw attention from companies that may be considering doing business in North Dakota."
 
Utah ranked 1st in the Forbes report for the second year. The full report is available at http://www.forbes.com/best-states-for-business.
 
The North Dakota Department of Commerce works to improve the quality of life for North Dakota citizens by leading efforts to attract, retain and expand wealth. Commerce serves businesses and communities statewide through committed people and partners who offer valuable programs and dynamic services.
 
For more North Dakota news and information go to www.NDCommerce.com.

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          Fargo 2.0: It’s Not Like the Movie   
By Seattle Times


Growing up here, Greg Tehven heard all the jokes.

“When I’d tell people I was from Fargo, I would get laughed at. It was almost as if other cities bullied us,” said Tehven, 29, a self-appointed community booster and co-founder of Emerging Prairie, a network of local entrepreneurs and startups.

It was bad enough when the movie “Fargo” came out two decades ago. Now it’s back as a TV show, and this time, the gap between the Fargo on screen — the one with the woodchipper — and the city that surrounds him is galling.

Tehven’s Fargo is the five-block radius of downtown; a vibrant community of artists, tech entrepreneurs, college kids and possibilities. Once hollowed out, the downtown is now crowded with coffee shops, restaurants and quirky shops that draw in crowds of strolling pedestrians and cyclists.

Tehven’s Fargo is one of the nation’s fastest-growing cities.

Newcomers are pouring into the Fargo-Moorhead region, pushing its borders outward, filling the schools to capacity, but still not filling all its 5,700 current job vacancies.

Neighboring West Fargo has built so many new schools, they hold contests to come up with names. Fargo itself, population 109,000, now sprawls across 48 square miles, a footprint the size of Boston.

“You feel like you died and went to heaven,” said James Gartin, president of the Greater Fargo Moorhead Economic Development Corp. — the man in charge of encouraging economic growth in a place now ranked as the best place in America to find a job, the country’s third-safest community and its fourth-fastest growing metro region.

“It’s electric,” Gartin said. “It’s just an incredible time to be in this market. Not only with the business growth, but we have this incredible entrepreneurial ecosystem.”

These are boom times for all of North Dakota, as western oil fields bring in money and jobs at a staggering rate. The unemployment rate is near 2 percent and there’s so much revenue rolling in, the Legislature has cut taxes by $2.4 billion since 2009, yet the state still has a $500 million surplus.

The Bakken oil fields are 400 miles northwest of here, and while the region benefits from the oil boom, most of its prosperity is coming from within. The largest employers in town are the health-care companies, the region’s many universities, the banks and the tech companies, led by Microsoft.

Beyond the five-block core of downtown, Fargo levels out into a sprawl of neighborhoods and businesses, with more going up every day; 2,700 new housing permits have been issued this year.

Plenty of towns talk about revitalizing their downtowns. Fargo is actually doing it, thanks to the happy combination of a good economy, a thriving business climate and motivated residents.

“We’re building the kind of city we want to live in,” Tehven said.

The rebirth of Fargo started with one building, and one man determined to save it.

When Doug Burgum sold his Great Plains Software to Microsoft more than a decade ago, he turned his time and resources to invest in the neglected downtown.

He started with a dilapidated old school-supply building that was about to be razed for a parking lot. In 2000, the city paid Burgum $100,000 to take it off its hands.

Burgum refurbished the building and donated it to North Dakota State University. Today, it’s Renaissance Hall and houses the university’s architecture department.

Other developers stepped forward to renovate other buildings.

“People ask, ‘What’s left to do?’ ” Burgum said. “I tell them we’re just getting started.”

The downtown is an attractive city center with amenities that can make the difference in attracting new businesses and workers.

“Value what makes your community distinctive. Don’t try to look like everyone else,” said Thomas Fisher, dean of the College of Design at the University of Minnesota.

The two largest demographic groups in America today are the baby boomers and the millennials, born between the 1980s and 2000s.

Both groups, Fisher said, are being drawn to downtown living, often for the same reasons — they want the entertainment, shops and amenities you can walk to, unlike the sidewalk-free sprawl of the suburbs.

Fargo is a city of networkers. One person will notice that the downtown alleys could use some sprucing up, and in short order Alley Fair gets created, with volunteers fanning out over town to fill vacant alleys with art, plants and light. It can feel like the city has a downtown-improvement flash mob.

“Fargo is filled with really talented, creative, hardworking people that care,” Tehven said. “And we’re having the time of our lives.”

Fargo 2.0: It’s Not Like the Movie - seattletimes.com



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          Other Lenders Are Toast   
One online lender hopes to lure millennials with avocado toast, Elizabeth Warren really loves HBO's "Ballers" and Clinton Portis says he contemplated killing his financial advisors.
          Comment on WP Engine Named Top Place To Work For Millennials by Simon   
This is so good
          The gender wage gap isn’t going away, millennials will have to continue the fight for equality   

Despite research that can be interpreted that Millennial women, (those currently between the ages of 18-35), are closing the wage gap for a variety of reasons, (millennial men are earning less, some millennial women are earning more), the fight for pay equality is still as important as ever. With data as current as 2016, research […]
          The Jewish Millennial Project   
There is plenty of conversation around the term “Jewish millennials” and what they want out of their jobs, their lifestyles, their philanthropy, their spirituality. A big focus of “the establishment” (older generations that hold positions of power in Jewish organizations) is how will this next generation of Jewish people embrace and engage with their Judaism,… Read More »
          Castro Valley CA Real Estate Agent Murline Monat Forecasts Housing for Millennial Buyers in 2015   

Murline Monat, Castro Valley CA Real Estate Agent, discusses the coming of age for the next generation of homebuyers and lifestyle changes that will affect the housing market.

(PRWeb February 20, 2015)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2015/02/prweb12532956.htm


          Comment on Beyond Black Twitter: Black Millennials Rule the Internet by SEO   
<strong>SEO</strong> [...]we came across a cool web page that you could possibly take pleasure in. Take a search should you want[...]
          A Day at the Newport Mall   

Sharing happenings during my hangout at the re-opened Newport Mall in Pasay last week!



Meet up with friends / Lunch in Ichiba

Just last month, Newport Mall reopens to the public and its loyal patrons. I finally had the chance to go back here with my blog friends last Thursday, and enjoy the usual dine-and-shop in one of my family's favorite one-stop mall (it's super near NAIA3!).

My parents and titas usually go here for the casino and the buffet. Meanwhile, I've been in RW one too many times for the shows--from concerts (Airsupply!!!) to world-class theater productions (Sound of Music!).
~

So I met up with the group in Ichiba, a Japanese restaurant that reminds me so so much of Dotonbori in Osaka--aka Japan's "Kitchen". The whole place looks like the typical, legit food and market place in Japan, and they serve a variety of Japanese cuisines like ramen, sushi, yakitori, tempura, gyoza, etc. Sobrang heaven!




I'll go back to try the other vegetarian food in Ichiba's menu! I saw a vegetarian tempura and my favorite tamago!

I first learned about this resto through Sarah during our Japan In Manila days, and finally got to visit and try it myself! I love it! I will always feel "at home" in anything Japanese or Korean, hehe!



Fun and chill lunch with these cool bloggers. ❤

I also watched a tempura and sushi cooking demo. I saw that everything's freshly made here in Ichiba:



Papi Rodel trying his hands on California Maki making:


Good job, Papi!

Other dining options at the Newport Mall include Recipes, Naah!m, Red Crab, Mr. Kurosawa, Annam, Italianni's, and many more. Some of them will have special offers and discounts till July 31, so it's the best time to go here!

Shopping Spree!

Why I prefer shopping at the Newport Mall: 1) Better stocks even on mid range brands like Bench and Mango, 2) Better service, 3) Less crowded than most malls in Manila!

They are also currently offering up to 70% off in most of the stores! Some of the brands available at the Newport Mall include Tommy Hilfiger, Victoria's Secret, Guess, Puma, Charles & Keith, Hush Puppies, Coalition, and Michael Antonio.

For trendy shoes, bags, and accessories, I went to Call It Spring:




I can't resist the logo shirts from Guess and Adidas, I realized that I have so much logo tees, it's turning into a collection na! Hehe.



Finally saw the 90s-cool Guess pieces that I've been looking for for a long time! They're all available at the Guess Newport Mall branch!


Comparing (shopping) notes with Ruthilish! Hehe!

Korea In Manila finds at the Newport Mall: Suzy Bae for The Face Shop and Park Shin Hye for Bench! 😍


All kinds of White Musk scents at The Body Shop, aka Goblin's perfume hehe:

Spotted: Affordable pink hoodie like the ones worn by your favorite Kdrama girls, available in Bench Newport Mall for only Php 699!

I saw Rhea buying a laptop case from Beyond The Box:

These are so kyeopta!!! Yellow and Millennial Pink sneakers with huge bows from Puma:

Where I wasted my time ~ Mango! They have pieces for as low as Php 400+!


Can't resist these comfy pieces at 50% off!

Coffee Break in Cafe Creole

After a tiring shopping for more than 1.5 hours, the gang headed to Cafe Creole, also located at the Newport Mall's The Plaza. I had a nice iced latte with sweet pastries, while my friends and I showcased our purchases to each other... My favorite part! Hehe! 😌😋


Ruth and Zed chilling by Newport Mall's plaza:


More Than Shopping And Dining!

But of course, a day is not enough at the Newport Mall! Aside from trying new cuisines and shopping to your heart's content, they also have top of the line cinemas currently offering special rates. Every 1pm to 4pm, children 12 years old and below can enjoy movies for the low price of Php 150! Meanwhile, adults may enjoy their favorite blockbuster for only Php 170! 

Want to pamper yourself? Island Spa is giving away 20% off in all their services, while Skin Perfection offers diamond peel treatments for only Php 499.

Heading Home 

Took lots of photos at the plaza before the group parted ways. If you're staying here till evening, Newport Mall holds musical events and live performances here at The Plaza from 7pm onwards.



Shoppers get to enjoy free parking by just presenting a minimum of Php 500 single or accumulated receipts. Otherwise, flat rate parking is just Php 50.

 Waiting for my Grab, hehehe:

Meanwhile, for fellow commuters! Coming to and from Newport Mall, get Php 50 off on your GrabCar fare by using the promo code "newportmall". Or you can just ask their very friendly guards to help you get a cab, they assisted me the whole time since it was already rush hour!

I really had fun that day! Thank you Newport Mall for hosting this fun bonding afternoon with blog friends I seldom see! Will definitely be back with my family naman. 😌

For more info, visit www.megaworldlifestylemalls.com.


          Short-Term Fears Seem to Affect Millennial Investors in Particular   

Many investors who lived through the Global Financial Crisis of 2007-2009 still might bear some scars, according to Franklin Templeton’s annual Retirement Income Strategies and Expectations (RISE) survey. The survey explores individuals’ attitudes and expectations about retirement and how prepared people feel regarding their future.


          Brooklyn Beckham, objeto de burlas por su libro de fotografías   
Brooklyn Beckham, el hijo mayor de Victoria y David, ha desatado la ira en las redes sociales. Primero por hacerse un tatuaje que no gustó a sus seguidores, y después, por publicar un libro con sus fotografías que si destaca por algo es por su falta de calidad conceptual. Ser el primogénito de dos estrellas internacionales no ayuda a la causa de Brooklyn, que recibe el ataque de los enemigos de sus famosos padres. El joven encaja bien la crueldad de los millennials sin prestar atención a las críticas. En caso de que no sigan la actualidad en las redes, el mayor de David y Victoria fue vilipendiado en Twitter por el libro que acaba de publicar, titulado «What I See» (Lo que yo veo), y publicado por Penguin Random House. Está compuesto de una selección de fotos tomadas por el joven de 18 años que van acompañadas de breves comentarios. Hasta ahora, la atención de las críticas se ha centrado en dos instantáneas que el mismo Brooklyn habría compartido en su página de Instagram. En ellas se puede ver una fotografía de un elefante a contraluz en la que se lee; «difícil de fotografiar, pero increíble de ver» y otra borrosa de una mesa con comensales donde avisa; «me gusta esta foto, fuera de foco, pero se entiende que suceden muchas cosas». Intentando minimizar el golpe, la compañía editorial de «What I See» asegura que «es un libro para adolescentes, realizado por otro adolescente, que aporta a los fans de Brooklyn una visión más íntima de su mundo a través de su única y creativa perspectiva». Así defendió Francesca Dow, directora jefe de Penguin-la publicación del libro en el periódico «The Independent». Y prosigue: «Las vidas de los adolescentes están llenas de imágenes y sabemos que las fotos de Brooklyn tienen gran calado entre su enorme número de jóvenes seguidores, ellos siguen ávidamente su vida a través de su fotografía. Estamos orgullosos de reunir esas imágenes en un libro para esta joven generación». Sorprende que la misma Dow hable de la popularidad del joven antes que de su talento y es la falta de este el motivo por el que se mofan en las redes. «En Penguin Random House publicamos un amplio abanico de voces para todo tipo de lectores», terminó la editorial en su comunicado. No cabe duda de que los personajes más expuestos por su fama, en este caso la de sus padres, son quienes terminan convirtiéndose en objeto de las críticas. Sin embargo, en este caso, han sido muchos los profesionales de la fotografía los que han sumado sus voces ante lo que ellos consideran una aventura artística en la que falta formación y experiencia creativa. Brooklyn Beckham, para muchos fotógrafos, no deja de ser un privilegiado que ha publicado un libro gracias a su apellido. Y mientras la editorial cuestiona si limitar las ediciones del libro de Brooklyn Beckham, las redes se ríen de la revista «GQ» que se marca una crítica tan positiva del libro que parece sacada de una película de Disney.
          The Vineyard Labor Circus Is Here   
The circus is in town. Didn’t get a ticket? I’ll give you insight into the Millennial mind in one sentence. Facebook goes public on Friday, so I canceled my account. Need more insight? I’m considering black listing several wine companies from buying Thomson Vineyards fruit in the future because I don’t like their business practices. […]
          Top 10 Ways ObamaCare Sticks It to Young Adults   

Top 10 Ways ObamaCare Sticks It to Young Adults

Top Ten Ways ObamaCare Sticks It to Young Adults

    By Dean Clancy

[Note: a .pdf version of this post can be found at the bottom of this page]

ObamaCare should really be called the Unaffordable Care Act, especially when it comes to adults in their twenties and thirties. ObamaCare’s “individual mandate,” which takes full effect on January 1, 2014, requires all Americans to purchase expensive government-controlled health insurance, even if they don’t want or need it. (1)  The defenders of this mandate, and especially the health insurance lobby, claim a mandate on all of us is necessary to “help the uninsured.”

In fact, the mandate’s real purpose is to prevent the system’s new government-run “health exchanges” from collapsing. Young adults are being singled out as the group who will have to bear the brunt of preventing this collapse. They’re being asked to sacrifice their dollars and their freedom.

Eighty percent of 20-somethings who earn more than about $18,500 a year will see their health insurance costs go up as a result of ObamaCare. In California, the cost of a basic plan for a 25-year-old male will jump as much as 92 percent, in Ohio as much as 700 percent! Meanwhile, the Administration is enforcing ObamaCare selectively, having granted more than 1,200 waivers to politically connected labor unions and corporations over the past three years, and more recently exempting all large businesses.

In short, ObamaCare is unfair, unnecessary, and harmful to our health. No wonder it’s so unpopular, even before it has been fully implemented. We call on all Americans, and especially millennials, to “burn their ObamaCare card,” join the “health care draft resistance” movement, and help us hasten the replacement of government-centered care with patient-centered care.

Here are the top ten ways ObamaCare sticks it to young adults:

1.    Raises insurance costs for adults under 40 (on purpose)
2.    Reduces access to workplace health insurance
3.    Shrinks workplace health benefits
4.    Reduces work-hours
5.    Kills jobs
6.    Increases debt
7.    Raises taxes
8.    Is unfair
9.    Is unnecessary
10.  Is insulting

1.    Raises insurance costs for adults under 40 (on purpose)

ObamaCare sticks it to young adults by driving up their health insurance costs. On purpose. That’s right, the law is designed to drive up costs for people in their twenties and thirties, in order to keep the new ObamaCare exchanges from collapsing.

Unless a lot of young, healthy people sign up to pay for insurance through the government exchange,  premiums will spiral upward as too many old and sick people sign up, which will cause the system to collapse. Thanks to ObamaCare’s numerous mandates, the health insurance in most cases will cost more than it’s actually worth, especially for young adults. Hence the need for a mandate requiring people to pay into the system. The young are, in effect, being drafted into compulsory national service.

How does ObamaCare drive up rates? Primarily by forcing insurance companies to accept all applicants, regardless of age or health status (“guaranteed issue”) and by forcing them to charge all applicants roughly the same price (“community rating”). These mandates make insurance more expensive, especially for healthier folks, some of whom naturally respond to the higher expense by becoming uninsured -- the opposite of the law’s alleged goal. Younger people tend to be healthier. That’s why they also tend to be uninsured -- the high cost isn’t worth it for them, relative to the benefit. The largest negative effects of guaranteed issue and community thus fall on younger people.

ObamaCare imposes a host of other mandates. One is to make insurers cover adults up to age 26 on their parents’ policy. That sounds nice, until we realize that it costs each of us an additional $100 to $400 a year on our health insurance premiums. (And by the way, since when it a 26-year-old a child?) Another mandate requires insurance companies to cover all services deemed by the government to be “preventative,” including “reproductive health services,” “free of charge.” That too sounds great, until we remember that there’s no free lunch. Mandates raise prices. Period.

How much will premiums rise for folks under 40? (2)

  • Almost 80 percent of those aged 21 to 29 with incomes greater than 138 percent of the federal poverty level, or about $18,560 a year, can expect to pay more out of pocket for coverage than they pay today. Younger, healthier individuals can expect premiums to increase by more than 40 percent. (3)  
  • In Ohio the cost of a basic plan for a healthy 25-year-old male will jump by nearly 700 percent, from $355.44 a year ($29.62 a month) in 2013 to $2,383.68 a year ($198.64 a month) in 2014. (4)
  • In California the cost of a basic plan for a healthy 25-year-old male will jump by 92 percent, from $1,212 a year ($101 a month) in 2013 to $2,196 a year ($183 a month) in 2014. (5)

The uninsured (two out of three of whom are under 40) have average annual health care expenditures of around $800 to $1,200. Since health insurance will cost a good deal more than that, they have an incentive to be uninsured. They need low-cost, economical coverage. ObamaCare gives them the opposite. (6)

By the way, premiums will only go down for older folks if young adults voluntarily swallow ObamaCare’s big rate hikes. If young adults opt instead to take a pass on the insurance and just pay the law’s $95 tax penalty “user fee,” rates will go up for older folks. (7)

You can’t defy the laws of economics. If we want to get more Americans insured, we have to enable insurance to cost less. ObamaCare makes it cost more, for the majority of Americans, and especially for young adults

2.   Reduces access to workplace health insurance

ObamaCare sticks it to young adults by incentivizing many employers to stop offering health benefits. When an employer stops offering health benefits, workers must either: a) rely on a relative’s health insurance; b) go into the ObamaCare “health exchange,” b) enroll in Medicaid or other government program for which they may be eligible, or c) join the ranks of the uninsured. Younger workers will often find themselves in the last category: uninsured.

About 156 million Americans (roughly half the U.S. population) get their health insurance through the workplace. Credible experts predict ObamaCare will cause anywhere from 7 million to 35 million Americans to lose their workplace health benefits over the next few years.

  • The official Congressional Budget Office (CBO) estimate projects that between 2014 and 2019 anywhere from 7 million to 20 million Americans will be “dumped” by their employers from their workplace health plan. (8)
  • A former head of the Congressional Budget Office (CBO) is more pessimistic, estimating that Obamacare “provides strong incentives for employers—with the agreement of their employees—to drop employer-sponsored health insurance for as many as 35 million Americans.” (9)

Wait. Would employers really do that? Would they really drop coverage? Yes, it seems, they would:

  • Thirty percent of employers tell surveyors they’ll “definitely” or “probably” stop offering employer-sponsored insurance in the years after 2014. (10)
  • One recent survey found 9 percent of employers “expect” to stop offering health benefits in the next few years (which would affect about 3 percent of the workforce, or about 5 million workers). (11)


Most of this “employer dumping” will occur among small businesses. That will disproportionately affect adults under 40. (12)

3.    Shrinks workplace health benefits
ObamaCare sticks it to young adults by incentivizing employers to offer stingier workplace benefits. Those employers who choose to offer health benefits will be under pressure to try to save money by making the benefits “thinner.” We already have reports of some employers switching to “skinny” plans, which are plans that don’t cover certain items, such as hospital stays. (13)  Yes, “skinny” plans are allowed under the statute. (14)

4.    Reduces work-hours
ObamaCare sticks it to young adults by causing employers to cut back on workers’ hours. (15)  The law’s “employer mandate” requires all employers with 50 or more full-time employees, beginning January 1, 2014, to offer expensive, government-regulated health insurance. (16) “Full time” is defined under the law as 30 or more hours a week. (The average American works about 32 hours a week.) So unsurprisingly, many firms are reducing workers’ hours to 29 hours or below, in order to avoid the expense. According to the Los Angeles Times:

[B]ig restaurant chains, retailers and movie theaters are starting to trim employee hours. Even colleges are reducing courses for part-time professors to keep     their hours down and avoid paying for their health premiums. Overall, an estimated 2.3 million workers nationwide, including 240,000 in California, are at risk of losing hours as employers adjust to the new math of workplace benefits. (17)

5.    Kills jobs
ObamaCare sticks it to young adults by causing employers to eliminate jobs, especially low-end, minimum wage positions. ObamaCare is causing a hiring slowdown. Part of the problem is uncertainty: employers are afraid to hire because they still don’t know how exactly the extremely complicated law will be enforced. But the bulk of the problem is the employer mandate itself: firms are avoiding new hires to avoid hiring that incredibly costly 50th employee. A health insurance plan can cost anywhere from $8,000 to $20,000 a year. The law says that if you offer coverage, it must be “affordable,” as defined by the government. That means you, the employer, must pay for roughly 92 percent of the plan’s cost. Many small firms simply can’t afford that. Right now, unemployment among Americans under 24 is a staggering 16.2 percent, and thanks to our economy’s anemic 2 percent a year growth rate, these Americans’ employment prospects are dismal. The ObamaCare-induced hiring slowdown only makes this problem worse, disproportionately affecting entry- and lower-level positions and thus younger adults trying to get their start in life.

6.    Increases debt
ObamaCare sticks it to young adults by driving up the national debt. The national debt has recently soared above $16,000,000,000,000 (sixteen trillion dollars), an historic high. Uncle Sam has additionally racked up nearly $100,000,000,000,000 (one hundred trillion dollars) in future, unfunded promises. That mountain of debt must be paid back by current and future generations. The cost of the law’s coverage provisions alone, over the first ten years of full implementation (2014 to 2023), is around $2,400,000,000,000 (two trillion four hundred billion dollars). The law will likely drive the deficit up by more than $700,000,000,000 (seven hundred billion dollars). (18) The problem boils down to basic math. As one analyst has summed up the problem:

Health spending now averages about 21 percent of households' personal income ... [but the] health care legislation presumes that those in an exchange shouldn't have to pay more than 10 percent of their income for a health insurance policy. (19)

That means someone is going to have to subsidize people who get their coverage through an exchange. Who is going to be on the hook for that subsidy? Current and future taxpayers, of course. How will it be paid for? Mostly through borrowing. (Uncle Sam currently borrows more than one-third of every dollar he spends.) So now young adults, who already carry historically high levels of student-loan debt, will have to help pay for the massive ObamaCare debt as well. (20)  How thoughtful.

7.    Raises taxes
ObamaCare sticks it to young adults by increasing taxes. ObamaCare imposes eighteen new taxes, including an expensive tax on medical devices and the first-ever tax on workplace health benefits -- even a new tax on the sale of your home. Those new taxes are projected to bring in a total of $514,000,000,000 (five hundred fourteen billion dollars) in additional federal revenues over ten years.
    ObamaCare’s 18 New Taxes

  1. Individual mandate tax on individuals who do not purchase health insurance.
  2. Employer mandate tax on employers who do not offer “acceptable” health coverage to their employees.
  3. Annual fee on health insurance providers based on each company’s share of the total market.
  4. Medical expense deduction is limited to those with expenses above 10% of adjusted gross income, up from previous 7.5%.
  5. 2.3% excise tax on manufacturers and importers of certain medical devices.
  6. 10% excise tax on indoor tanning services.
  7. Fee on manufacturers and importers of branded drugs, based on each individual company’s share of the total market.
  8. Increased Medicare portion of FICA payroll tax, rising to 3.8% from previous 2.9%, on couples earning more than $250,000 a year ($200,000 for     single filers); increased tax is also applied to investment income for the first time.
  9. Increased penalty for purchasing over-the-counter products with HSAs to 20%.
  10. Reduction in the number of medical products taxpayers can purchase using funds they put aside in HSAs and FSAs.
  11. Limit on the amount taxpayers can deposit in flexible spending accounts (FSAs) to $2,500 a year.
  12. Fee on insured and self-insured health plans to fund PCORI agency.
  13. Elimination of the corporate deduction for prescription expenses for retirees.
  14. Increase in taxes on health insurance companies, by limiting the amount of compensation paid to certain employees they can deduct from their taxes.
  15. End of special deduction for Blue Cross / Blue Shield organizations.
  16. 40% excise tax on “Cadillac” health insurance plans costing more than $10,200 for individuals and $27,500 for families (begins in 2018).
  17. Exclusion of unprocessed fuels from the existing cellulosic biofuel producer credit.
  18. Increase in corporate taxes by making it more difficult for businesses to engage in activities that reduce their tax liability.

8.    Is unfair
ObamaCare institutes basic intergenerational unfairness. Sixty-four-year-olds typically spend six times as much on health care as 18-year-olds. Logically, their health insurance rate should be six times higher. But ObamaCare says insurers can charge older folks no more than three times what it charges a young person. This 3:1 community rating forces millennials to pay about 75 percent too much for insurance, so folks in their early 60s can underpay by about 13 percent. Nice! (21)

9.    Is unnecessary
The tragedy of ObamaCare is that it isn’t even necessary. There are less coercive, less expensive ways to help the uninsured. Here are some simple ways to reduce health care costs and thus increase the number of insured people, without costly government mandates or price controls:

  1. Promote competition by passing a federal “health care freedom act” that makes participation in all federal health care programs completely voluntary for individuals.
  2. Permit individuals to deduct 100 percent of their medical expenses from their taxes.
  3. Allow people to buy health insurance across state lines.
  4. Allow everyone, including folks on Medicare and Medicaid, to have a Health Savings Account (HSA) (a pre-tax savings account for medical expenses coupled with a high-deductible health insurance plan).
  5. Provide targeted assistance, via the states, for the one percent of Americans who can’t afford good private health insurance because of a preexisting medical condition.
  6. Encourage states to reform their medical malpractice tort laws to reduce costs. (22) 

This robust agenda would benefit young adults and indeed all Americans by promoting patient power in the health care marketplace. It would help lower the excessive cost of health care, which is the real problem, by reducing meddlesome government mandates, which are the real culprit.

10.     Is insulting
ObamaCare insults young people’s intelligence by trying to make them believe they are benefiting from a policy that actually targets them for the biggest pain.

P.S. There’s an eleventh reason ObamaCare sticks it to young adults: its inevitable negative effects on the quality and availability of medical care. With the new system’s top-down, centralized approach, there will be higher costs, longer wait times, and incentives for doctors and hospitals to scrimp on care.

Conclusion: Burn Your ObamaCare Card!

ObamaCare was rammed through Congress in the name of “helping the uninsured.” What it really does is hurt the young. Two-thirds of the uninsured today are in their twenties and thirties. Most of the uninsured make a rational choice to go without insurance because government policies have made it too expensive, relative to its value for them.

The individual mandate, ObamaCare’s linchpin, will hit young adults the hardest. Eighty percent of 20-somethings who earn more than about $18,500 a year will see their health insurance costs go up as a result of ObamaCare. In California, the cost of a basic plan for a 25-year-old male will jump as much as 92 percent, in Ohio as much as 700 percent! The individual mandate, ObamaCare’s linchpin, is unjust, unnecessary and harmful to our health.

Millennials would be better off “burning their ObamaCare card” and resisting the “health care draft.” We call on Americans who can do so to “opt out” of the ObamaCare mandate and instead pay the small penalty tax “user fee” for being uninsured (or for not having ObamaCare-compliant coverage). (23)  If enough Americans join the resistance movement, we can hasten the collapse of the exchanges, reverse the Washington takeover, and pave the way for a health care system that works for, rather than against, patients. (24)

End Notes
1. Tens of millions of Americans are statutorily exempted from the individual mandate, including prisoners, illegal immigrants, certain religious sects, Native Americans, Americans living overseas, Americans who don't have to file a tax return, Americans whose employer offers them coverage that would cost them more than 8 percent of their income, and any American granted "hardship" status at the discretion of the Health and Human Services secretary. Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, section 1501.
https://www.bcbsri.com/BCBSRIWeb/pdf/Individual_Mandate_Fact_Sheet.pdf

2. The following estimates are for insurance in the individual or nongroup market. That is, not for coverage received through the workplace or the government.

3. http://www.contingenciesonline.com/contingenciesonline/20130102#pg33

4.Louise Radnofsky, “Ohio Complains of Higher Health-Insurance Premiums,” Wall Street Journal, June 6, 2013, http://blogs.wsj.com/washwire/2013/06/06/ohio-complains-of-higher-health...

5. Avik Roy, “The War On Bros: Exchange Subsidies Won't Protect Young People From Obamacare's Higher Insurance Premiums,” Forbes, June 7, 2013,  http://www.forbes.com/sites/theapothecary/2013/06/07/the-war-on-bros-exc...

6.   ObamaCare supporters try to downplay “rate shock” figures like these, by noting that costs will go down for some older folks. True. But how much comfort is it for a millennial faced with a 92 percent premium increase to know that his 64-year-old neighbor will enjoy a 10 percent decrease? Supporters of the law also say that folks earning up to about $45,000 a year will get a relatively generous subsidy, on a sliding scale, to help them afford the premiums (courtesy of the taxpayer), if they buy coverage in the government exchange. Also true. But that taxpayer subsidy is only available to people whose employer doesn’t offer “affordable” coverage, as defined by the government (and whose state doesn’t offer Medicaid to people earning more than 100 percent of poverty). It’s hard for anyone to know for sure whether he qualifies for the subsidy and will remain qualified for it, since third parties (employers, state policy makers) are the ones making the critical decisions affecting his eligibility.

7. Here is now the individual mandate penalty works. The IRS will levy penalties on individuals who don’t buy government-approved insurance. The annual fines will equal the greater of $95 per adult or 1 percent of income (in 2014); $325 or 2 percent (in 2015), $695 or 2.5 percent (in 2016); and then will rise with inflation. The fine for uninsured children equals one-half the adult fine. Additionally, many people are exempted from the mandate, such as those for whom premiums exceed 8 percent of household income. Hence, as premiums increase, more and more people will be exempted from the mandate.

8.  Seven million figure comes from: CBO, Effects of the Affordable Care Act on Health Insurance Coverage—February 2013 Baseline,” February 5, 2013, http://www.cbo.gov/sites/default/files/cbofiles/attachments/43900_ACAIns.... Twenty million figure from: CBO, “The Effects of the Affordable Care Act on Employment-Based Health Insurance,” March 15, 2012, http://www.cbo.gov/publication/43090. See also: CBO, “How Has CBO’s Estimate of the Net Budgetary Impact of the Affordable Care Act’s Health Insurance Coverage Provisions Changed Over Time?” March 20, 2013, http://www.cbo.gov/publication/44008. CBO does think it possible that the number of people in employer-based coverage could go up, by 3 million; but the agency designates as its “best estimate” a 7 million person drop in workplace coverage

9. Douglas Holtz-Eakin and Cameron Smith (American Action Forum), “Labor Markets and Health Care Reform: New Results,” May 2010,  http://americanactionforum.org/files/AAF_Labor%20Markets%20and%20Health%....

10. McKinsey & Company, “How US health care reform will affect employee benefits,” June 2011, http://www.mckinsey.com/insights/health_systems/how_us_health_care_refor...

11. Deloitte, “2012 Deloitte Survey of U.S. Employers: Opinions about the U.S. Health Care System and Plans for Employee Health Benefits,” July 2012,  http://www.deloitte.com/view/en_US/us/Insights/centers/center-for-health....

12. Some workers will lose what the law deems to be “affordable” benefits, as their employers offer “unaffordable” plans intentionally, knowing that doing so will drive their lower-income workers to look outside the firm for health coverage, which will save the employer money (because paying a $3,000 federal penalty fine is cheaper than paying for a $8,000 to $20,000 insurance policy). Some economists predict that we may see a lot of firms restructure themselves into two “sister firms”: one for higher-wage workers who will continue to enjoy company health benefits, and one for lower-wage workers who will be “dumped” into the government exchange. In other words, lower-income workers will get the short end. And guess which age group will be hardest hit by that? Yep, young adults.

13.  Brett Norman, “ACA Penalties Spawn ‘Skinny’ Plans,” PoliticoPro, July 16, 2013, http://www.politico.com/story/2013/07/some-workplace-health-plans-will-b....

14. http://www.forbes.com/sites/theapothecary/2013/05/21/employers-can-minim...

15.  The employer mandate will take effect on January 1, 2014. In July 2013, the Obama Administration surprised everyone by announcing it was unilaterally cancelling the mandate for a year, pushing the effective date back to January 1, 2015. While this cancellation is illegal, so long as the mandate is only delayed temporarily the incentives for employers to cut back on hours and hiring will remain essentially unchanged. The one-year delay will probably cause more employers to “dump” their workers into government health exchanges in 2014 than would otherwise have been the case. This, we suspect, is exactly what the Administration intends.

16. Here is now the employer mandate penalty works. The IRS will level a tax penalty on businesses with more than 50 full-time employees who fail to offer health coverage. The fine is $2,000 per employee after the first 30 employees. Employers will also be fined for failing to offer “affordable” coverage, as defined by the law. The fine is $3,000 per employee if coverage costs more than 8.5 percent of that worker’s income.

17. Chad Terhune, “Part-timers to lose pay amid health act's new math,” Los Angeles Times, May 2, 2013, http://articles.latimes.com/2013/may/02/business/la-fi-part-time-healthc....

18. Estimate by Senate Budget Committee Republicans, based on CBO projections, for the years 2014-2023.

19. C. Eugene Steuerle (Urban Institute), "Fixing the Nation's Four-Tranche Universal Health System: Next Steps for Both Republicans and Democrats," October 28, 2010, http://www.urban.org/publications/901386.html

20. ObamaCare supporters protest that the law “doesn’t add a dime to the deficit,” citing the official CBO cost estimates for the legislation. But that claim doesn’t stand up to scrutiny. The law only appears “deficit neutral” on paper, because of massive budget gimmicks like these. In reality, ObamaCare will cost taxpayers dearly, with younger taxpayers getting hit the hardest. The law includes $700 billion in ten-year Medicare reductions (to help pay for the new entitlement) that the Chief Actuary of the Medicare program assumes are unlikely to take effect, because they would cause 15 percent of hospitals to go out of business by 2019. (Source: CMS Chief Actuary Richard S. Foster, Memorandum on Estimated Financial Effects of the “Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act,” as Amended,  April 22, 2010, http://www.cms.gov/Research-Statistics-Data-and-Systems/Research/Actuari....) Members of Congress will never voluntarily allow large numbers of hospitals in their districts to go out of business. They will move to provide federal relief. And the relief will most likely come in the form of reversing the Medicare payment reductions. The Chief Actuary also points out that the law assumes a series of deep, automatic, annual reductions in Medicare payments to doctors that Congress has historically never allowed to take place.

21. Avik Roy, “Putting the ‘Insurance’ Back in Health Insurance, Forbes, May 21, 2012, http://www.forbes.com/sites/theapothecary/2012/05/21/putting-the-insuran...

22. Dean Clancy, What Should Replace ObamaCare, July 17, 2012,
http://www.freedomworks.org/blog/dean-clancy/what-should-replace-obamacare.
See also: Avik Roy, “The Tea Party’s Plan for Replacing ObamaCare,” Forbes, April 7, 2012,
http://www.freedomworks.org/blog/dean-clancy/forbes-the-tea-party-plan-f...

23. For many people, especially younger citizens, it will be more financially sensible to just pay the fine than to buy overpriced health coverage. The fine is small (only $95, or 1 percent of one’s income, whichever is higher, in 2014). If you refuse or neglect to pay the fine on your yearly tax return, the statute prevents the IRS from punishing you, other than by withholding any tax refund you are owed. So you could theoretically sidestep any penalty whatsoever by adjusting your income tax withholdings to avoid being owed a refund.

24. Jacqueline Bodnar, “FreedomWorks Announces “Burn Your ObamaCare Card” Campaign to Resist the Compulsory Health Care Law” (press release), July 11, 2013,  http://www.freedomworks.org/press-releases/freedomworks-announces-%E2%80.... See also: Dean Clancy, “Burn Your ObamaCare Card,” Washington Times, July 10, 2013, http://www.washingtontimes.com/news/2013/jul/10/burn-your-obamacare-card/


          Six ways hotels are targeting the millennial market (and benefiting us all)   
Hotels, they are a'changin', as hoteliers develop properties that cater to the younger, tech-savvy generations.
          My lunch with screen legend Angie Dickinson reminds me that millennials are overrated   

These dog days of summer are marked not so much by a general listlessness, for I deal with that always, but by dogs themselves. Ours are huffy, always panting, and they hate being cooped up in the house … just hate it.

Still, I savor these days of early July, because there is so much summer ahead,...


          Science, race, and comic books: Xavier Harding ’12 writes for    

As a science and tech reporter, Xavier Harding ’12 would say that his favorite assignment to date focused on a comic book—Marvel’s Ta-Nehisi Coates-led reboot of Black Panther, to be precise.

There are a myriad of reasons why this assignment stands out to him above the countless others he’s worked on.

For starters, it was an assignment that he conceived of himself while working at Popular Science (PopSci), a print- and web-based media outlet that shares the latest scientific developments with the general public. After reading the comic, Harding was intrigued by the advanced technology portrayed in the fictional east African nation of Wakanda—technology that easily outpaces the already advanced multiverse filled with scientific-experiments-turned-superheroes like Iron Man, Captain America, and the Hulk.

It also served as an opportunity for him to combine his interests in the intersection of science, technology, and race. Black Panther was Marvel’s first black superhero, and artist Brian Stelfreeze draws upon African culture and history to influence the design of the innovative technology found throughout the series.

But if Harding is being perfectly honest with himself, it was a story that excited his inner comic book nerd.

“The whole time, I was giddy with nerd excitement,” Harding explained. “I contacted Marvel and within minutes they got back to me, saying that they were into the idea. I was talking with the lead artist less than a week later. When I think of all of the stories I’ve written, that’s the one I had the most fun writing.”

A scene from Marvel's Black Panther, depicting people using the kimoyo bead technology, the design of which was influenced by African culture.

A scene from Marvel's Black Panther, depicting people using the kimoyo beads, the design of which was influenced by African culture.

Now, Harding is a tech and gaming reporter for Mic, a media company catering to millennials. The move finds him focusing on more of what he loves—a web-only media strategy—while still reporting on the subjects that interest him.

It’s a perfect position for the New York City-native who knew early on in his college career that he wanted to go into digital journalism. In fact, it was that awareness that drove the focus of his individualized studies major—journalism in the digital age—and served as the foundation for many of his career exploration opportunities—including internships with both LAPTOP Magazine and The Gettysburg Review.

But it was the opportunities to study abroad that originally attracted Harding to study at Gettysburg.

“I first heard of Gettysburg at a college fair. The rep mentioned that over 50% of students at that time studied abroad. That really interested me because I knew I wanted to study in a Spanish-speaking country, and clearly, the College does a good job of helping you get there.”

Headshot of Xavier Harding

Harding ended up spending a semester on the Yucatan peninsula in Mérida, Mexico. He took classes that allowed him to explore his interests in journalism and media, lived with a local family,—the Los Pintos—and was immersed in both Mexican and Mayan culture.

On campus, Harding was a member of the improvisation group Shots in the Dark, participated in the Latin American Student Association, worked with WZBT radio station, regularly took advantage of activities and workshops provided by the Office of Multicultural Engagement, and played on a few intramural teams.

“Meeting so many different types of people at Gettysburg, and being able to spend a semester in Mexico, those are experiences that added up to something more than the sum of its parts,” Harding said. “I’m able to talk to and relate to many different types of people—it’s a skill that has gotten me far, and Gettysburg has definitely helped me do that.”

It’s helped him to achieve his career goal of working in digital media, with a resume that includes stints at IBT Media, as well as the aforementioned PopSci and Mic.

It’s also helped him to find ways to combine his interests in science and equality-related issues, too—beyond his Black Panther story.

“When I was working at PopSci, it really became clear to me that I need to cover science, technology, and gaming from a lens of race and inclusion,” Harding said. “Everyone uses these products, but if you don’t have people from all walks of life influencing the design, it won’t work for all of the people who are intended to use it.”

Now, he strives to highlight stories that elevate people, products, and perspectives that might not otherwise break into mainstream news—like his story on the CEO of Black Girls Code, one on visually-impaired gaming, and another on the depiction of black characters in video games.

It’s work that continues to excite him, and it is that excitement that serves as the foundation of career advice he’d offer to current students, too.

“When you know what career path you want to pursue, don’t be shy about it,” Harding said. “It’s cliché, but know what you want to be doing and be eager about it, be un-coolly adamant about it. The more you put yourself out there and the more you make a habit of doing great work, the more people will start to take notice. It’s taken me a while, but it’s served me well.”


          5 Things You Need to Start Rewarding Yourself For   

The problem with Millennials, according to people who have never been one, is that they expect praise and rewards for everything. Participated? Medal. Attempted? Pat on the back. Lost? Trophy.

But far from breeding laziness and entitlement, as is often claimed, rewarding ourselves frequently and liberally helps us learn new skills and develop desirable traits. …


          This week in science: hold the pickles   

Tunicates are odd forms of phyla Chordata, superficially similar to vertebrates in terms of evolution and development. Most look about as dumb and plant-like as it’s possible to be and still technically be a metazoan animal. The colonial forms, like the sea pickles, may descend from ancient lines. But here’s something new in their behavior:

Ric Brodeur, a research biologist at the NOAA’s Northwest Fisheries Science Center in Newport, Ore., said that beachcombers in Oregon have been walking the beaches there for decades, but he has started getting reports of pyrosomes washing up on the beaches only in the past few months. He has also been going to sea on research cruises since the 1980s and saw his first pyrosome only in 2014. He believes the high abundance is related to unusually warm ocean conditions along the coast that resembles pyrosomes' normal habitat.

Gosh, I wonder what could possibly be causing warmer oceans? And how can science ever be sure to be an arbitrary, 100 percent metaphysical godlike certainty anyway?

  • No, no, no: Anonymous did not hack secret NASA evidence about hidden alien life.
  • Scientists say up to a third of the marine megafauna might have gone extinct a few million years ago, leaving the resultant population familiar to us a lot less rich than it was. One like culprit was changing coastlines during a global climate shift …
  • Silicon Hills, aka Austin, gets a tech shout out in The Hill:

In just three decades, the Austin region has transformed from a sleepy university and state government town into a national driver of economic activity and innovation. We are a destination city for entrepreneurs, millennials and breakfast taco aficionados.

Then there’s a third option which is gaining ground in some scientific circles, panpsychism. In this view, the entire universe is inhabited by consciousness. A handful of scientists are starting to warm to this theory, but it’s still a matter of great debate.


          Younger-Dryas cooling and sea-ice feedbacks were prominent features of the Pleistocene-Holocene transition in Arctic Alaska   

Declining sea-ice extent is currently amplifying climate warming in the Arctic. Instrumental records at high latitudes are too short-term to provide sufficient historical context for these trends, so paleoclimate archives are needed to better understand the functioning of the sea ice-albedo feedback. Here we use the oxygen isotope values of wood cellulose in living and sub-fossil willow shrubs (δ18Owc) (Salix spp.) that have been radiocarbon-dated (14C) to produce a multi-millennial record of climatic change on Alaska's North Slope during the Pleistocene-Holocene transition (13,500–7500 calibrated 14C years before present; 13.5–7.5 ka). We first analyzed the spatial and temporal patterns of δ18Owc in living willows growing at upland sites and found that over the last 30 years δ18Owc values in individual growth rings correlate with local summer temperature and inter-annual variations in summer sea-ice extent. Deglacial δ18Owcvalues from 145 samples of subfossil willows clearly record the Allerød warm period (∼13.2 ka), the Younger Dryas cold period (12.9–11.7 ka), and the Holocene Thermal Maximum (11.7–9.0 ka). The magnitudes of isotopic changes over these rapid climate oscillations were ∼4.5‰, which is about 60% of the differences in δ18Owc between those willows growing during the last glacial period and today. Modeling of isotope-precipitation relationships based on Rayleigh distillation processes suggests that during the Younger Dryas these large shifts in δ18Owc values were caused by interactions between local temperature and changes in evaporative moisture sources, the latter controlled by seaice extent in the Arctic Ocean and Bering Sea. Based on these results and on the effects that sea-ice have on climate today, we infer that ocean-derived feedbacks amplified temperature changes and enhanced precipitation in coastal regions of Arctic Alaska during warm times in the past. Today, isotope values in willows on the North Slope of Alaska are similar to those growing during the warmest times of the Pleistocene-Holocene transition, which were times of widespread permafrost thaw and striking ecological changes.


          The role of paleoecology in restoration and resource management—The past as a guide to future decision-making: Review and example from the Greater Everglades Ecosystem, U.S.A   

Resource managers around the world are challenged to develop feasible plans for sustainable conservation and/or restoration of the lands, waters, and wildlife they administer—a challenge made greater by anticipated climate change and associated effects over the next century. Increasingly, paleoecologic and geologic archives are being used to extend the period of record of observed data and provide information on centennial to millennial scale responses to long-term drivers of ecosystem change. The development of paleoecology from an emerging field investigating past environments to a highly relevant applied science is reviewed and general examples of the application of paleoecologic research to resource management questions in diverse habitats and regions are provided. Specific examples of the application of paleoecologic research to the restoration of the Greater Everglades Ecosystem of south Florida (U.S.A) are presented. Conducting valuable scientific research that would benefit resource management decisions, however, is not enough. Scientists and resource managers need to be engaged in collaborative discussions from the beginning of the research process to ensure that management questions are being addressed and that the science reaches the people who will benefit from the information. Paleoecology and related disciplines provide an understanding of how ecosystems and individual species function and change over time in response to both natural and anthropogenic drivers. Information on pre-anthropogenic baseline conditions is provided by paleoecologic research, but it is the detection of long-term trends and cycles that allow resource managers to set realistic goals and targets by moving away from the fixed-point baseline concept to one of dynamic landscapes that anticipates and incorporates an expectation of change into decision-making.


          Why Are So Many Young Voters Falling for Old Socialists?   
Jeremy Corbyn, Bernie Sanders, Jean-Luc Mélenchon, socialists, young socialists, Bill Clinton, Tony Blair, Hillary Clinton, Donald Trump, radical politics, young voters, millennials

Politicians like Bernie Sanders and Jeremy Corbyn have carried the left-wing torch in a sort of long-distance relay, skipping generations of centrists like Bill Clinton and Tony Blair, to hand it to today’s under-35s.


          Pics of the Day   
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A few of my favorite things gathered in one neat little convenient spot last night - Aubrey Plaza and Dave Franco, human joke machines, showed up at the storied Rare Book Room of the Strand Bookstore (shelves shelves shelves!) along with their Little Hours director Jeff Baena to read a trio of passages from Giovanni Boccaccio's 1353 opus The Decameron, upon which Baena based his "Nuns Gone Wild" film, which is out in some theaters tomorrow. In case you missed the film's trailer, click here

Anyway this was a strange and wonderful thing to witness, a clash of millennial sarcasm and great literature, and I wouldn't have missed it for the world, and so... I didn't, as these photographs make clear. I also posted a video snippet of Aubrey reading on my Instagram right here, and a video snippet of Dave reading on my Instagram right here. You should see The Little Hours -- I'm planning on reviewing the movie in a bit, so stay tuned for that. But first...
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.
... I do just have to share that! I have no idea why Call Me By Your Name leading man Timothée Chalamet was in the audience but he definitely seemed to be there with one of the people on stage because he left with them as they left. But I managed to snap that quick shot of him, and can I just say that he is stunning in person - on film he looks young (which yes I keep getting shit for every time I post about him) and awkward, which is perfect for the role in Call Me By Your Name, but in person... wow. Not a bad angle.
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          New Study: Generation Z Votes Republican   
A new study by political scientist Jeff Brauer finds that the generation after Millennials, Generation Z, is expected to lean Republican.
          Folks, TV May Have Reached Peak Millennial Slacker-Com   
Netflix's most recent streaming series is just the latest in a long line of stories about young people trying to figure themselves out. Is it too much?
          Alexander McCobin: How This Millennial Became The CEO Of Conscious Capitalism   
I spoke to Alexander McCobin, CEO of Conscious Capitalism, about his goals, his views on the conscious capitalism movement as a whole, what unique advantages millennials have in the business world, and his best pieces of career advice.
          Drew Houston: Why The Most Successful Entrepreneurs Solve Big Problems   
I spoke to Drew Houston, the CEO and co-founder of Dropbox, about the unique qualities that millennials have, the challenges he faced while growing up companies, what he's learned about himself and business, what the culture of Dropbox is like, his hiring criteria, his future and best career advice.
          Lolly Daskal: The Seven Archetypes Of The Most Successful Leaders   
I spoke to Lolly Daskal, author of the upcoming book The Leadership Gap: What Gets Between You and Your Greatness, about the seven archetypes of the most successful leaders, what happens when leaders rely too much on their current skills, the Millennial leadership dilemma and her best career advice.
          Kathryn Minshew: How To Navigate The New World Of Work   
I spoke to Kathryn Minshew, co-author of The New Rules of Work, about how the workplace has changed in the past decade, why there isn't a perfect job for everyone, the best way to network, why younger Millennials are in demand, and her best career advice.
          Jerry Stritzke: How He Leads REI, A Purpose-Driven Organization   
I spoke to Jerry Stritzke, the CEO and President at REI, about his speech at the upcoming Conscious Capitalism 2017 event, how REI is attracting and retaining the millennial generation, their work culture, how they are evolving their business as it's being disrupted and his best career advice.
          Coach and Kate: Why It's the Perfect Match   
In buying Kate Spade, Coach is getting millennial shoppers. But the deal also frees Coach from some of the baggage weighing on the company.
          Siete clínicas estéticas fueron sancionadas por Susalud en el país - El Comercio   

El Comercio

Siete clínicas estéticas fueron sancionadas por Susalud en el país
El Comercio
En total, Susalud ha supervisado 15 clínicas y centros estéticos en varias regiones en lo que va del año. (Foto: Susalud). En total, Susalud ha supervisado 15 clínicas y centros estéticos en varias regiones en lo que va del año. (Foto: Susalud ...
Susalud impuso medidas de seguridad en siete clínicas de cirugía plásticaDiario Gestión
Los varones millennials, a favor de la cirugía estéticaClarín.com

los 3 artículos informativos »

          ‘Rich Dad Poor Dad’ Author Issues Warning to Trump    
 Infowars reporter Millie Weaver interviewed Robert Kiyosaki at the Red Pill Expo held in Bozeman, MT where he discussed the dilemma Millennials face in today’s workplace and how they are dealing with student loans.In this exclusive interview, Kiyosaki speaks about his friendship with President...

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#pigsinabowl Is this guineapig toilet trained?😳I don't want him having an accident on my shoulder. 🦁🤣🤣🤣Action 🗣🎥 @kimmie_kissez @newfacemediaproductions #crewlife #pottytraining #directorslife #gentrification #millennials #innerdemons #film @boadiodie #webseries #comedy #nyc #bronx #brunch #indiefilm #drama #absurdity #producers #activist #bloggers #actors #picoftheday #political #amazing #photooftheday @bronx_bj @sirtree #hiphopmusic @artist___up @spielbergfan12004 @zacharymichael_ny @tahchxboom @boadiodie @whoisdenverjones @shariffsinclair
          La generación que cambiará España   
La brecha política entre millennials y mayores anticipa una España del futuro muy distinta. Su efecto puede ser tan importante como lo fue la generación de la Transición.
          My lunch with screen legend Angie Dickinson reminds me that millennials are overrated   
These dog days of summer are marked not so much by a general listlessness, for I deal with that always, but by dogs themselves. Ours are huffy, always panting, and they hate being cooped up in the hou ... - Source: feeds.latimes.com
          Coach and Kate: Why It's the Perfect Match   
In buying Kate Spade, Coach is getting millennial shoppers. But the deal also frees Coach from some of the baggage weighing on the company.

          What Your Tinder Profile Says About You?   

TinderWho ever said that romance was dead? Well it was probably yours truly, but millennials are no longer being courted with flowers, or taken to the drive in movie theatre on dates. No, instead we are a generation that lives in a series of short lived relationships, one night stands, and dating apps like Tinder. […]

The post What Your Tinder Profile Says About You? appeared first on Oxygen.ie.


          Helen Owen   

In recent years a brand new category of career has emerged. It is one that is hard to describe, and, at times, hard to believe, but it is booming, and anyone who even dabbles with social media is acutely aware of it. It is the sudden infiltration of the “Influencer,” a millennial job aspiration technically defined as an individual who has the power to affect purchase decisions of others because of authority, knowledge position or relationship. With 1.2 million followers on Instagram alone, few know it better than Helen Owen.

A California enthusiast—born in Silicon Valley, schooled at UCLA and proud La La Land dweller—Helen built a name for herself via social media. What started with a Tumblr blog in high school has exponentially grown into a way of life. While attending UCLA, she began taking the creation of social content seriously and was recognized by several significant brands. A few collaborations later and the popularity of her digital presence exploded.

While millions know her and just as many heed her fashion, travel, fitness and general lifestyle advice, Helen has a hard time defining her own career when asked about a specific job title. And while the inquiry gives her a bit of pause, she typically designates herself as an influencer and model who works with select brands to integrate creative projects into her personal lifestyle and travel narrative. Her travel and life companion, Zack Kalter, who has amassed a not-to-scoff-at 141K followers, might one day have the same question to answer.

We did a little Helen Owen stalking (and direct questioning) ourselves to find out more about the model and media maven’s substantial following, remarkable travel destinations, eye for design and slight Oribe obsession.

You have 1.2m Instagram followers, which is a massive accomplishment. What is it about your content that has attracted so many followers?
If I knew what the secret ingredient was, I’d write a book, become a billionaire and retire tomorrow! But seriously, people are attracted to personalities they can relate to and trust. In addition to going above and beyond to get the best content possible, I like to think I’ve built a level of trust with my audience.

What are five other Instagram accounts that everyone should follow right now?
My friends Alyssa (@alyssalynch) and Jordan (@taylorcutfilms) are an adorable couple that travel the world and produce amazingly inspiring videos.

I recommend throwing them a follow and giving them a good stalk. I’m obsessed with @overheardla at the moment. That account is a collection of hysterical conversations overheard in various Los Angeles locations.

An awesome travel account I love to follow belongs to Jessica Stein (@tuulavintage)—I aspire to visit half of the remarkable locations she’s explored.

And, finally, my fashion inspiration always has been and will continue to be Julie Sariñana (@sincerelyjules).

What are some of your favorite travel destinations?
The Greek islands of Mykonos and Santorini are my all-time favorites. I haven’t missed a summer vacation there in the past three years. You can’t beat the energy of Mykonos and the beauty of Santorini. I also fell in love with the Maldives and can’t wait to visit again.

What has your time spent in different locations around the world taught you?
Having spent the past two years traveling, I’ve learned how easy it is to fall in love with places. Ironically, I’m a homebody who is easily homesick and nostalgic, but I seem to have applied those emotions to the various places I’ve visited and loved. As a consequence it feels like I’ve built mini homes throughout the world, and I’m homesick for all of them simultaneously. That may or may not be the definition of wanderlust, but there you have it.

Has L.A. or any of your travels influenced your sense of style?
My personal style is a mishmash of influences from California-festival style to athleisure with random mood swings of boho and classic chic. Los Angeles has been my main fashion influence, and I tend to bring that with me everywhere I go.

What are your Oribe must haves?
My all time hair favorites are the Gold Lust Repair & Restore Shampoo and Conditioner and the Après Beach Wave and Shine Spray. I also use the Côte d’Azur Eau De Parfum as my daily scent, which means in addition to my hair smelling magical, I tend to smell of Oribe all over, all the time.

What has been the most “pinch-me” moment of your career?
I like to think that my best “pinch-me” moments are still ahead of me, but I have had a handful and each one requires a tighter pinch than the last. Almost all of them happen when we travel somewhere new.

What is one wardrobe mainstay you couldn’t live without?
This is so hard. If you’re including swimwear, I feel like I have to go with bikinis. If we’re sticking to clothing, then I couldn’t live without simple cut-off denim shorts—so California of me. 

What is the craziest thing on your bucket list?
I want to do a road trip across America over the course of a few months. I know that sounds rather tame compared to villas in exotic locations or skydiving, but to me that’s a crazy bucket-list item.

Tell us about your foray into designing and collaborating with Birksun.
I majored in “Design Media Arts” at UCLA, and have always loved design and being creative. During my senior year I modeled in a couple of Birksun commercials, and, afterward, they approached me about a design collaboration. I could not have been more honored. It was an incredible hands-on design project to undertake as a student, and so was born Birksun’s “London Collection.”

Do you have a weekly workout/eating routine that you stick to even when traveling?
My routine has changed over the past few years, but I think I finally have a rhythm of at-home body-weight workouts to stick to when traveling. I’m not very strict when it comes to eating, but I tend to gravitate toward clean, healthy options. When traveling, I opt for a lot of fresh fruits, veggies and lean proteins, and stay away from carbs as much as possible. Dessert is a non-negotiable with me, but I try to limit sugars in other ways, such as swapping water for juice and drinking coffee black. 

What’s your favorite thing about your fans?
I don’t like to refer to anyone who follows me as a fan—I stalk everyone back, so it feels like a two-way street. But over the years I’ve noticed certain people who follow me are actually paying much closer attention than I thought. I’ve had a few low points over the past four years where I thought no one noticed my emotional rollercoasters, but I received the kindest messages and encouragement. It makes me realize how perceptive certain followers are, and I honestly—and weirdly—feel like I have friendships from afar. 

What is your everyday hair routine?
I keep it so simple. My priority is for my hair to look healthy rather than totally styled. I wash, towel dry and blow out. Oribe products do the rest.

If you had to wear one outfit for the rest of your life what would it be?
This is so difficult. Thinking practically—and because it can be dressed up or down—I’m going with simple jeans and a t-shirt. Boring, but it makes the most sense to me given the gravity of this question.

Bikini or bralette?
Bikini

Instagram Stories or Snapchat?
Ah, the social media dilemma of the moment! I try to do both, and use each of them for their strengths. I approach Snapchat in a more casual way, so I’d say I have more fun with Snapchat (ahem, filters). With Instagram Stories, I like to keep my content more polished and professional. This is where I incorporate favorite brands and products in conjunction with my Instagram posts.

Most important thing in your life?
My relationships and my health, both mental and physical.


          #nextrecruiting17: Viel mehr als nur neue Recruiting-Tools   
Nicht die Firmenwebsite und deren Karriereteil, sondern das Eingabefeld der Suchmaschinen ist zunehmend der Startpunkt für eine potenzielle Mitarbeiterbeziehung - und oftmals gleichzeitig das Ende. Wer die besten Talente für sich gewinnen will, braucht also nicht nur optimierte Recruiting-Prozesse, er muss sich auch mit dem Mitarbeiter als Botschafter befassen.

Wir agieren in einer immer intelligenteren Arbeitswelt, und die braucht immer intelligentere Leute. Der Wissenszuwachs beschleunigt sich exponentiell. Was heute noch richtig war, ist morgen veraltet. Unternehmen können in diesem Kontext auf Dauer nur dann erfolgreich sein, wenn sie den Intellekt, die Kreativität und die volle Schaffenskraft von Toptalenten für sich gewinnen. Dazu braucht es

1. bewerberaffine Recruiting-Prozesse,
2. WOM von begeisterten Mitarbeitern.
3. das aktive Einbinden der Millennials.

Wer dabei durchfällt, erhält von qualifizierten Aspiranten niemals mehr Post.

Bewerberaffine Candidate Journeys entwickeln

Nicht nur auf einer Reise in fremde Länder, sondern auch auf einer Reise durch die Recruiting-Landschaft kann man eine Menge erleben. Und jeder Kontakt hinterlässt Spuren: in den Köpfen und Herzen der Menschen - und oft genug auch im Web. Denn wie im wahren Leben will man von seiner Reise erzählen. Solche Erfahrungsberichte beeinflussen die Vorentscheidungen Dritter in ganz erheblichem Maße. So fallen viele Arbeitgeber durchs Rost, bevor es überhaupt zu einem ersten Kennenlernen kommt.

Wer nämlich als Bewerber mit Unternehmen interagiert, ärgert sich nach wie vor über vieles: den Spamfaktor von Active Sourcing, die mangelnde Nutzerfreundlichkeit einer Website, das nicht mobiloptimierte Bewerbungsformular, altertümliche Stellenbeschreibungen, geschönte Fakten, endlose Reaktionszeiten, standardisierte Interviews, respektloses Verhalten, nicht eingehaltene Versprechen und vieles mehr.

Ursache dafür sind überholte Verfahren aus der Vergangenheit, Methodenhörigkeit, unangebrachte Arroganz, Bürokratisierung und ein Mangel an Bewerberorientierung. Man schwelgt in Prozessen, die für das Unternehmen zwar praktisch, für die Kandidaten jedoch ätzend sind. Selbst die vielversprechendsten Leute kommen sich dabei nicht wie Umworbene, sondern wie Bittsteller vor. Fachkräfte- und Nachwuchsmangel ist in solchen Fällen kein Branchenproblem, sondern selbstverschuldet. Das Problem heißt: Unverständnis für Bewerberbelange.

Wer sich für die vielversprechendsten Talente attraktiv machen will, für den ist das Entwickeln einer Candidate Journey heute ein Muss. Diese wird, und das ist der springende Punkt, aus der Perspektive des Bewerbers betrachtet. Dabei wird durchleuchtet und sichtbar gemacht, wo und wie die Bewerber suchen, was sie wirklich erwarten, welche Erfahrungen sie während des Bewerbungsprozesses machen wollen und tatsächlich machen und wie ihre Reaktion darauf ist. In Fit für die Next Economy beschreibe ich detailliert, wie das funktioniert.

Die Macht der Mitarbeiter durch WOM

Im Vorfeld jeder Bewerbung spielt WOM, also Word of Mouth in Form von Hinweisen auf Arbeitgeber-Bewertungsportalen, in User-Foren und Blogbeiträgen sowie jegliche andere Form von Mundpropaganda und Weiterempfehlungen eine zunehmend wichtige Rolle. Solche Interaktionspunkte werden im Fachjargon „Earned Touchpoints" genannt, denn man kann sich das (hoffentlich) Positive, das an solchen Punkten ausgedrückt wird, nicht wie eine Stellenanzeige kaufen, man muss es sich vielmehr verdienen.

Früher wurde das, was die Öffentlichkeit von einem Unternehmen erfahren sollte, über sorgsam formulierte Pressemitteilungen, Hochglanzbroschüren und Vorstandssprecher geschönt und gesteuert. Was sich hinter den Firmenfassaden aber tatsächlich begab, gelangte nur vereinzelt nach draußen: Wenn jemand in seinem persönlichen Umfeld von einem Vorfall erzählte, oder wenn etwas zu den Medien drang.

Heute sieht das völlig anders aus: Die Beschäftigten berichten über Interna im Web. Sie sind zu Botschaftern ihrer Arbeitgeber geworden. Und die Unternehmen haben keinerlei Kontrolle darüber, was den Agoras der Neuzeit im Cyberspace alles anvertraut wird. So entscheiden die eigenen Mitarbeiter, enttäuschte Bewerber und Ehemalige maßgeblich mit, wer die besten Talente gewinnt. Denn bevor man hört, was ein Unternehmen selbst über sich sagt, lauscht man denen, die aus erster Hand berichten.

Die Mitarbeiter als Fürsprecher gewinnen

Anstatt also Sonntagsreden zu schwingen, sich aufzuhübschen und in teuer bezahlte Arbeitgeber-Markenkampagnen (Employer Branding) zu investieren, sollten Organisationen viel mehr dafür tun, dass es drinnen bei ihnen stimmt. Zum Beispiel sind 15 Prozent aller neuen Mitarbeiter bereits am ersten Tag derart entsetzt, dass sie sofort wieder gehen möchten, fand die Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM) heraus. Und dies ist jetzt nur ein Punkt von unglaublich vielen.

Die Einzigen, die in einer vernetzten Gesellschaft glaubwürdig für Vertrauen sorgen und sogar Vertrauensverluste wieder heilen können, sind die, die wissen, wie es hinter den Firmentoren tatsächlich läuft. Sie wollen, dass Ihre Beschäftigten als Fürsprecher für Ihr Unternehmen fungieren? Dann sorgen Sie dafür, dass die Leute tollen Gesprächsstoff haben, den sie unbedingt mit ihren Netzwerken teilen wollen. Genau das ist ein geradezu unwiderstehlicher Lockstoff für profilierte Topkandidaten.

WOM zieht Bewerber wie magisch an. Vor allem die jungen Talente werden zuerst die O-Töne Dritter im Web ansteuern. Google nennt sie die „Zero Moments of Truth" (ZMOT). Dies sind die Momente der Wahrheit vor dem ersten direkten Kontakt, die schonungslos offenbaren, was die Arbeitgeber-Versprechen tatsächlich taugen. Sie erzählen von den Bewährungsproben, die eine Firma bereits erfolgreich gemeistert hat - oder auch nicht. Vor maroden Arbeitsbedingungen, einem miesen Klima und schlechten Führungsmanieren kann jeder nun rechtzeitig die Flucht ergreifen.

Das Involvieren der Millennials ist elementar

Viele Anbieter werden schon allein deshalb vom Markt verschwinden, weil sie keine qualifizierten Young Professionals mehr finden, die für sie tätig sein wollen. Deshalb ist es zwangsläufig ein Muss, die junge Generation aktiv beratend und coachend miteinzubinden, wenn es um die Auswahl neuer Kollegen, das Gestalten eines ansprechenden Recruiting-Prozesses, ein adäquates Onboarding usw. geht.

Das Kreativpotenzial junger Menschen ist auf alles Neue und in die Zukunft gerichtet. In einem digital transformierten Kosmos leben sie längst. Und wenn sie Arbeitswelten schaffen, dann sind diese daran adaptiert. Domänen, in die sich tradierte Unternehmen erst noch mühsam hineindenken müssen, sind für sie seit Langem vertrautes Terrain.

Insbesondere dann, wenn man auf die Suche nach Young Professionals geht, gibt es nur eine Gruppe von Menschen, die sagen kann, wie man sie tatsächlich für sich gewinnt: die Young Professionals selbst. Betriebe, die sich nicht auf die Erwartungen der jungen Generation einstellen können, werden deren Potenzial niemals gewinnen.

Die junge Generation, auch Millennials oder Digital Natives genannt, lässt sich bei der Entscheidungsfindung vor allem von Ihresgleichen leiten. Zudem ist es für sie ganz selbstverständlich, ihre Erfahrungen in allen möglichen Netzwerken zu teilen. So sorgen sie dafür, dass neue, gute, passende Zukunftsgestalter unbedingt bei Ihnen und nicht anderswo arbeiten wollen. In diesem Fall ist das Recruiting plötzlich ganz leicht.

Dieser Beitrag nimmt an der Blogparade #NewRecruiting17, initiiert von Henrik Zaborowski und Winfried Felser, teil.

____

Lesenswert:




Leserumfrage: Wie fandet ihr uns heute?


2017-03-08-1488965563-6721107-iStock482232067.jpg


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          Now is the winter of our dis-content: A glossary for the times we live in   
Do you confuse your branded storytelling with your sponsored content? Are you disruptive or merely a dial-mover? How old is too old to be millennial? If these questions keep you up at night then you clearly aren’t on the right sedative. For the rest us, I’ve been mulling over some of the phrases that have […]
          How the Church Can Reach Millennials and Digital Natives via Video   
With every generation that passes, the church often has to examine its methods to determine whether they are effective in communicating the gospel effectively to the local community. Within the past decade, the number of young families actively involved in a local church has dwindled, leading many churches to ask how they might best be Read more…
          Selfie Culture: What is Wrong with Loving Yourself?   
There has been a recent claim in the media that “selfie culture” has emerged from a generation of millennials, but truthfully we were not the first people to create such a tradition. Louis Dagueree was the first to invent a... Read More ›
          7/1/2017: Cars Guide: Initial promise   

THERE is more to the Toyota C-HR than its millennialfriendly bodywork. The size marks it as a straightforward alternative to a Mazda CX-3 or Honda HR-V in the compact SUV class and the styling makes it a visual rival to the funky Nissan Juke. What’s...
          Chabaud Vert d’Eau Perfume Review   
I can’t really think of a genre in perfumery that is more polarizing than “green”. So many people, novices and experienced perfume wears, have told me they don’t like green perfumes. I’m not really surprised by their confession. The last time green perfumes were “in” was decades ago, before Millennials were even born. They don’t… Read More Chabaud Vert d’Eau Perfume Review
          New Midtown Sacramento housing is ideal for millennials   
19J 11-story mixed-use building set for completion in late fall 2018
          The Surprising Positive Power of Walking   
Communities who walk reap economic opportunities, environmental improvements, and health benefits.

Many things leap to mind when someone mentions walking: fitness, fun, fresh air, relaxation, friends and maybe your most comfortable pair of shoes.  But a word that rarely arises is “power”.

That will begin to change after the 2017 National Walking Summit (held in St. Paul, Minnesota September 13-15), which is themed “Vital and Vibrant Communities—The Power of Walkability”.

Like earlier summits, this event brings together people of all backgrounds to strategize ways of making sure the advantages of walking can be shared by all, no matter what their income or where they live.

Walking advocates once focused primarily on physical health —spurred by mounting evidence that physical activity is key to preventing disease—but now are stepping up to promote social, economic and community health. Their ultimate goal is to transform towns and neighborhoods across America into better places for everyone to live.

 “The power of walking is becoming more clear all the time,” declares Kate Kraft, executive director of America Walks. “Community connections, social equity, a sense of well-being, business opportunities, affordable housing, more choices for kids and older people, a cleaner environment—these are some of the benefits of walkable places.”

Walking Boosts Health & Happiness

Streams of medical studies now document the central role physical activity plays in fending off disease and disability. Chances of depression, dementia, colon cancer, heart disease, anxiety, diabetes and other conditions drop by at least 40 percent among people engaging in moderate exercise such as walking. 

landmark study issued last year found that sedentary habits are a bigger health threat than high blood pressure or cholesterol— about the only thing more dangerous than inactivity is smoking reported the New York Times.  This followed on the heels of a Cambridge University study showing that a lack of exercise increased your risk of death twice as much as obesity. 

All the scientific data persuaded former Surgeon General Vivek H. Murthy to issue a landmark Call to Action to Promote Walking and Walkable Communities in 2015, which has been compared to the 1964 Surgeon General’s report on the dangers of smoking. “Walking helps people stay both physically and mentally healthy,” Murthy wrote, calling on us “to increase walking by working together to increase access to safe and convenient places to walk.” 

Walking stands out among all other exercise because: 1) It is free; 2) It requires no special training or equipment; 3) It can be done almost anywhere at any time; and 4) It is already Americans’ #1 favorite physical activity.  The US Department Transportation reports that Americans reported walking 14 percent more in 2012 than in 2002 (latest figures available).

Walking Advances Social Justice

“The health benefits of walking are so overwhelming that to deny access to that is a violation of fundamental human rights,” declared sociologist Robert A. Bullard, founder of the environmental justice movement, at the 2015 Walking Summit. “All communities should have a right to a safe, sustainable, healthy, just, walkable community.”

Unfortunately, that’s not the case across America today. People walking in lower-income neighborhoods are twice as likely to be killed by traffic than those in more affluent areas. African-Americans on foot are 60 percent more likely to be killed by cars than whites, while Latinos are 43 percent more likely.

“If you have walkable communities, kids will do better in school…seniors will be healthier,” said Ron Simms—a neighborhood activist from the African-American community of Seattle who later became Deputy US Secretary of Housing and Urban Development, at the 2015 Summit. 

Better walking conditions also help low-income families economically.  Surprising new research from the George Washington School of Business shows “the most walkable urban metros are also the most socially equitable. The reason for this is that low transportation costs and better access to employment offset the higher costs of housing.”

This is backed up with Federal Highway Administration data finding that families living in auto dependent communities spent 57 percent of their income on housing and transportation, compared to 41 percent in walkable communities.

This refutes widespread rumors that making a street safe for walking is a luxury important only to well-off people. Actually, low-income residents benefit the most because they travel by foot the most, especially kids.  “The fact is that we have twice as many low-income children [nationally] who are walking or biking to school than those in affluent neighborhoods, even lacking the infrastructure to protect the children,” reports Keith Benjamin, Transportation Director in Charleston, South Carolina.  

“A big thing we could do to help low-income families is to make it easier to live without a car,” says community consultant Gil Peñalosa.  “And it would help middle-class families to switch from two cars to one.” The American Automobile Association calculates the annual pricetag of owning one car at  $8,500 a year—which goes a long way toward easing household budgets.

Safe, convenient and comfortable places to walk are fundamental to the forgotten one-third of Americans who don’t drive— the young, the old, the disabled and those too poor to buy a car. These people live under a form of house arrest in many US communities, unable to do much of anything—buy groceries, see friends, go the doctor, engage in favorite activities—without begging someone to chauffeur them. Communities from San Francisco to Birmingham to rural Iowa are pulling together to eliminate the roadblocks that deter people of all ages, incomes and racial backgrounds from walking.

 Walking Expands Economic Opportunities

People on the street mean business—literally.  Neighborhood and downtown business districts thrive on foot traffic.  West Palm Beach, Florida discovered this after making a major avenue more comfortable for pedestrians, and attracting $300 million in new business investment.  Albert Lea, Minnesota—a blue-collar rural town of 18,000—found the same thing when a walk-friendly makeover of its Main Street drew 15 new businesses in two years, with $2-5 million more in investment planned.

Even companies not dependent on local customers are eager to locate in walkable districts—especially firms in the booming tech and creative fields, who realize the young talent they depend on to stay competitive want to work within walking distance of cafes, parks and cultural attractions.  “We moved from the suburbs to downtown Minneapolis to allow our employees to take advantage of the area’s many trails and to put the office in a more convenient location for commuting by pedal or foot,” explained Christine Fruechte, CEO of large advertising firm Colle + McVoy, in a newspaper op-ed. “Our employees are healthier, happier and more productive. We are attracting some of the best talents in the industry.”

Many other companies find that walkable locations pay off in lower health insurance premiums. Thomas Schmid of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention points to Volkswagen, which built a manufacturing plant in Chattanooga only after local officials agreed to extend a popular walking-biking trail to their door.

Walking Connects People & Strengthens Communities

Eighty five percent of Americans express the desire to live somewhere walkable, making it the #1 quality they want in  a home, according to  the National Association of Realtors’ Community & Transportation Preference Survey. This is even more true for Millennials, millions of whom will be looking to buy their first home over the next few years. 

 “What makes people walk is [also] what makes great places to live,” emphasizes Harriet Tregoning, until recently a director in the Office of Community Planning at the US Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD). “Walkability is the secret sauce that improves the performance of many other things” in our communities.

Former Surgeon General Regina Benjamin emphasizes that taking a stroll “is good for the social fabric of our communities”—creating new opportunities to connect with friends and neighbors, which is not only good for your soul but also your health. That’s why Benjamin added a walking path to the grounds of the health clinic she founded in rural Alabama.

Walking Protects Our Environment

Walking more is an important step you can take to avert climate disruption, air pollution, urban sprawl and other environmental threats. More than half the suggestions in 50 Steps Toward Carbon-Free Transportation, released last year by the Frontier Group research organization, involve walking.

Walking in the Heartland

Drawing a crowd ranging from block club organizers and grassroots advocates to elected officials and medical experts, the 2017 Walking Summit features two-and-half days of workshops, major addresses, trainings, break-out discussions, success stories and on-the-ground exploration of solutions in Minnesota communities.

Among the more than seventy sessions are:  How to Build Safe Walking Networks; Walking in Rural Communities; Creating Walkable Communities Without Displacement; You Are Where You Live and Creative Walkable Interventions.

Keynote speaker Tamika Butler—director of the Los Angeles County Bicycle Coalition—will showcase how her organization broadened their mission from sustainable transportation to social justice. “We must talk about public health, gentrification, people of color, women who feel harassed on the streets, older people, black men who fear for their lives on the street, immigrants who fear deportation,” Butler says.  “Walking for many people has everything to do with living full lives and being able to get around.”

St. Paul Mayor Chris Coleman—who launched a first-of-its-kind $42 million Vitality Fund to promote walking and other community improvements—will also speak at the conference along with racial and social justice leader Glen Harris from the Center for Social Inclusion and George Halvorson of theInstitute for InterGroup Understanding, who made strides in launching walking movement as CEO of the  Kaiser Permanente health care system.  

Participants will find specific information and inspiration to take back home by following one or more of the Summit’s six “paths” of subject matter:

Healthy Communities: People’s zip codes are as accurate as their genetic code in predicting a healthy life. That’s why it’s essential to put in place policies, programs and resources to ensure everyone has an equal chance for a healthy life.

Safe, Well-Designed Communities: Too many communities are designed for the ease of motorists with little thought of people who get around other ways. The focus here is practical approaches to provide safe, convenient transportation and affordable housing for all.

Artistic and Innovative Communities:  Creativity flourishes in places where people regularly connect face-to-face on sidewalks and in public spaces.  Discover ideas about fostering foot-friendly settings that spark community engagement, cultural diversity and imaginative energy.

Productive and Thriving Communities: Walkability is closely linked with socially and economically successful places. Here’s where to start in creating vibrant neighborhoods, equitable development, affordable housing and strong downtowns or Main Streets.

Open and Collaborative Communities: Wide-ranging collaboration explains the difference between towns, suburbs or cities that blossom and those that wither. What’s the key in getting people together for authentic conversations and effective partnerships?

Engaged and Informed Communities: Access to information and decisionmakers are two powerful tools for transforming a community. These sessions offer a detailed look at new methods to gather data, engage communities, mobilize citizens and influence local government and businesses to catalyze walking. 

This is the first Walking Summit held outside Washington, DC.  “We’re really excited to showcase some of the success we’re seeing, but also share the challenges we have in Minnesota,” says Jill Chamberlain, chair of the local host committee and a senior program manager in the Center for Prevention at Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Minnesota, a featured sponsor of the event.

The Twin Cities metropolitan area in many ways represents a microcosm of America when it comes to walking. Minneapolis and St. Paul both rank relatively high for the rate of pedestrian trips among US cities, but until recently autos were the centerpiece of all urban planning in the region. Many suburbs lack sidewalks and other basic infrastructure for pedestrians. Concentrated populations of low-income households and/or people of color are found in both suburbs and cities. But there is a growing awareness that walking is important to future prosperity and quality-of-life—and growing numbers of projects to get people back on their feet.

Mobile workshops on the first day of the conference will fan out across the  area to investigate local initiatives that illustrate the power of walking— from  a police department campaign for pedestrian safety to a residential neighborhood with a small town feel to an inner city community torn apart by a freeway, which is exploring plans to reconnect itself by building a land bridge over the road.

    

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There are a few movies that I will watch again and again; much to my wife's dismay. She will muddle something under her breath about how many times I have watched this movie as she shakes her head and walks away. I think of it as the mark of good movie. You know what's going to happen, and you still watch it because it's a great film. One of these movies, for me anyway, is All the President's Men (1976) staring Robert Redford and Dustin Hoffman. If you are a millennial, or someone who doesn't follow politics, it's the story about two young reporters who investigate, and keep digging to prove a connection between the Nixon White House and a burglary at a Democratic campaign office in the Watergate office complex.

Yeah, something fishy was going on, but unless you kept pushing, kept asking questions, kept the heat on until someone gave you a piece of the puzzle, there would be no story. Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein kept digging, kept pushing for information, even when everyone else had lost interest. It didn't hurt that most everyone at the Washington Post hated Richard Nixon, but even if they were motivated by politics, they did their job. They broke the story, and that story brought down an administration, and sent people to jail. It also made Woodward and Bernstein famous and the darlings of the DC cocktail scene. The other impact Watergate made was to inspire generations of journalism majors to not just report the news, but go out and 'change the world'.

I watched that movie (again) last night, and I was startled by the conclusion I reached as the credits rolled. That movie may have signaled the end of objective journalism in America.

The news business has always had a left of center slant since I can remember. I watched Walter Cronkite, and Dan Rather along with the rest of the evening news anchors read the news since I was a boy. Granted, you only saw them a half hour each night, so it was harder to get a sense of their political leanings. However, time has a way of bringing out their biases, especially when they get out from behind that chair.

In the 70's, the percentage of republicans in the newsroom was about 25%. Today, only 7% of journalist are Republicans. Most reporters won't tell you what party they affiliate with; they claim to be independent. One look at the front page of any major paper will tell you what they won't; they are far to the left of the nation they are reporting on. That's fine. If your industry wants to present a single point of view, you are certainly allowed to do so. If you want to hire only like-minded people and have a business model based on monolithic group think, it is certainly your right. Just don't ask me to weep for you as your circulation crumbles and your newsrooms get smaller and smaller.

Journalist once reported the news, today they have chosen sides, and that side has little to do with truth. Today, most of the main stream journalism has much more to do with ideology than transparency and accountability of government. Just look at who they give their own money to.

Even working for a democrat politician doesn't seem to disqualify you from being an "objective" journalist. From Chuck Todd, George Stephanopoulos, Chris Matthews, back to Tim Russert, being a former democratic staffer just gives you insight, not bias, I guess. The list of reporters married to democrat staffers, politicians and government officials is almost endless. 

Watch how easily progressives slide between journalism and Democratic Party operatives.

At this year's Democratic Convention, Debbie Wasserman Schultz was fired as Democratic Party Committee Chair after emails leaked detailing her coordinating with various news outlets and reporters to make sure Hillary Clinton faced no hard questions during interviews. So what happened next? Donna Brazile stepped in to replace her. Donna Barzile was working for CNN and ABC at the time!  Now it's come out that Brazile even fed a potentially damaging question to the Clinton camp before the Townhall because she thought it might be tough one for Hillary to answer. Oh, and Wasserman Schultz? She was hired by Hillary Clinton as a campaign consultant! Presto chango! One minute a journalist, the next, a democrat operative, and vise versa.

It's just one big game of musical chairs between democrats and journalists. What ever happened to the reporting the truth, no matter the party affiliation? Journalists are not interested in the truth today, unless that truth is damaging to a person or political party they disagree with. The Republican Party is by far the largest target, but even Bernie Sanders got a little taste of this when he went up against the media's anointed candidate.

Look, I know this is the time you start saying "Oh yeah? Well what about Fox News! Those guys are all a bunch of rightwing nut jobs!" Point taken.

I am not a huge fan of Fox News, or any cable news channel for that matter. Fox has it's point of view, and slants its coverage to its audience. If you wonder why Fox beats the pants off the other cable news channels, the answer is simple. There is no balance, or should I say very little conservative point of view presented on CNN, MSNBC, ABC, CBS, and NBC news. I would say they are 90% liberal/progressive in what they cover, and maybe even more importantly, what they don't cover.  As for Fox, if  I had to put a number on it, I would say the conservative to liberal coverage of news stories on Fox is 70/30. However, most of the so called conservatives at Fox are main stream, big government republicans anyway.

Lord help us if you're getting you news from The Daily Show, Bill Maher or NPR.

Back to my point. If the big media, the New York Times, The Washington Post, CNN, etc, were interested in the truth, they would be out for blood in these latest batch of Hillary Clinton's emails. 


They would be looking at The Clinton Foundation for what it is; a thinly veiled pay-for-play racketeering ring where Bill and Hillary take hundreds of millions of dollars from large corporations,  foreign countries, and the super wealthy elites, to use their contacts and, in Hillary's case, her official position as Secretary of State, to influence public policies and make things happen for their donors.

You simply can't have your closest, most senior advisors and staffers, working for (and getting handsomely compensated by) the US State Department, The Clinton Foundation and private lobbying firms, all at the same time! 

Remember all you folks who were trying so hard to connect Dick Cheney to Halliburton after he sold all his shares before becoming VP? He had all his money in a blind trust and had no interaction with Halliburton during the Iraq war, but you were certain he was pulling strings to make himself millions.  Hillary is openly doing what you wanted Cheney imprisoned for; Making her, her family, and her friends rich by using public office. 

Now Hillary is running for president, and the money is pouring in, by the billions, with a "B". 

Look, it's a good deal if you need something done through the government to make yourself, or your corporation, your country, or your NGO rich. The whole world knows she is open for business, and business is booming.

 After this election, the truth about Hillary Clinton will come out. Did you notice I said after this election? Once the media has another democrat safely in the White House, they will start to get curious about the Clinton Foundation. Especially the ones who were Bernie Sanders supporters. My guess is Senator Clinton will not make it through her first term. The pressure will be too great and she may site "her health" as a reason to step down before she is impeached. Can you say President Tim Kaine?

Back to All the presidents men. I wonder where today's Woodward and Bernstein are? My guess is there are entire newsrooms full of gung-ho reporters out to "change the world", they just want to make sure that change fits with their progressive world view. If not, they're not interested in the story....


          U.S. fertility rate just hit a historic low, and some demographers are freaking out   
Some experts think millennials are just postponing parenthood while others fear they’re choosing not to have children at all.
          Bartender/Bar Manager - Pane e Bene Restaurant LLC - Westport, CT   
Professional female bartender with some experience, a fan energetic person with upscale clientele and millennials client experience. High school or equivalent....
From Indeed - Tue, 27 Jun 2017 19:04:34 GMT - View all Westport, CT jobs
          20 años de Harry Potter: cómo convertir un libro juvenil en la biblia 'millennial'   

La literatura infantil tiene algo de morboso, de prohibido. Asumimos el mantra de que todo tiene su edad, y que hay ciertas lecturas que deben quedarse para siempre en un rincón nostálgico de nuestra memoria. Hace tiempo que matamos a la última hada de Nunca Jamás, a la Emperatriz Infantil y reducimos nuestro reino de Fantasía a un montón de añicos. Y así debe seguir, dejando espacio a las nuevas generaciones para que jueguen con los niños perdidos y vuelvan a llenar la isla de polvo de hadas.

Regresar a estos títulos solo tiene excusa si queremos transmitir el legado a los más pequeños o recordarlos con cariño. O eso creen algunos. Harry Potter llegó hace 20 años y puso patas arriba el concepto de literatura infantil y juvenil, convirtiendo el primer libro en un placer culpable tanto para niños como para adultos. Aquellos que se hicieron con un ejemplar en 1997, hoy celebran la existencia del oasis mágico con las mismas ganas que hace dos décadas. O incluso más.

Durante esta semana se han sucedido los homenajes, sobre todo por parte de los que crecieron con Harry, Ron y Hermione y ahora se acercan o traspasan la treintena. La escuela de hechicería más famosa del mundo se mantiene intacta porque los lectores todavía no han dejado de creer en la magia. Y eso no siempre es bien recibido.

Los adultos de la llamada generación millennial fueron quienes soñaron con recibir una carta de Hogwarts y con sobrevolar el mundo muggle a lomos de un Hipogrifo. Habrá quienes lo hayan leído y no lo aguanten, pero tuvieron que pasar su infancia fuera de la Vía Láctea si jamás escucharon hablar del que no debe ser nombrado. En cambio, la Generación Potter, coetánea pero no necesariamente inherente a la millennial, lleva la saga de J.K Rowling un paso más allá del fenómeno fan. 

"Me regalaron un pijama de Gryffindor por mi 27 cumpleaños", reza un artículo de The Guardian, en el que se recogen testimonios de los seguidores de Harry Potter en su veinte cumpleaños. El Mundo también dedica su especial a estos Potterianos, que no consideran incompatible peinar canas con celebrar a su ídolo de la infancia. A cada alarde de frikismo, a cada desfile de personas disfrazadas de su mago favorito, le sigue el consiguiente dedo acusador sobre el infantilismo de los millennials.

El de Harry Potter ha sido un fenómeno insólito, y como tal ha despertado todo tipo de pasiones. Mucha gente no comprende que esta saga orientada al público juvenil sea reivindicada aún por sus lectores primigenios y piensan que esto es sinónimo de una carencia cultural. "La infantilización de los adultos embona bien con un mundo empobrecido culturalmente. De otro modo, Harry Potter no podría ser un ídolo de las multitudes", escribió Juan Soto Ivars en una columna titulada Los adultos están volviéndose niños de nuevo.

Los que siguen esta línea argumentan que esto se debe a un triunfo del capitalismo, que incita a un "consumo emocional" y a exigir nuestro derecho a "rescatar el niño que todos llevamos dentro". Han existido otras sagas poderosas como Las crónicas de Narnia, de C.S Lewis, o Los cinco, de Enyd Blyton, que no pudieron mercantilizar su obra de esta manera. ¿Por qué Harry Potter ha sobrevivido a la transición a la vida adulta?

Política a través de la lente Potter

Para empezar a analizar el fenómeno como se merece, hay que admitir que la saga de J.K Rowling trasciende la moralina blanca y fácil de mucha literatura juvenil. Los mensajes de Harry Potter han servido como símil político y filosófico, para analizar los auges nacionalistas o enaltecer valores como la igualdad de género y raza, la tolerancia y el bien común. Mirar constantemente el mundo a través de la lente Potter no es solo una consecuencia de los fans, sino una estrategia ideada por su propia autora. 

A diferencia de C.S Lewis o, en el caso español, Laura Gallego, J.K Rowling permitió que sus lectores estirasen la fantasía mágica tanto como quisiesen. No solo con sus versiones cinematográficas, sino con foros que terminaron convirtiéndose en páginas oficiales de información y debate sobre este mundo alternativo. ¿Se ha lucrado con ello? No se llega a tener más dinero que la reina de Inglaterra por casualidad. ¿Ha conseguido también generar una comunidad más allá del club de lectura y los amantes del cosplay? No cabe la menor duda. 

El truco de analizar la actualidad política y social a través de sus libros es infalible. De ahí las comparativas de Trump con Voldemort, la defensa a una Hermione negra o la salida del armario de Dumbledore.  "Rowling ha seguido actualizando el mundo que ella creó para asegurarse de que encaja con cómo la generación de Harry Potter ve su propia lucha política", escriben en la web Spectator.

Por muy inocente que lo consideremos, esto ocurre porque ya había una base de grandes lecciones en el manuscrito de 1997. La autora quiso teñir de pociones y haces de colores que salen de varitas las guerras que se han librado en la vida real y los problemas sociales que poco a poco hay que inculcar a los niños. Sobre todo a los afortunados que pueden habitar en su burbuja hasta bien entrada la madurez.

El universo de J.K Rowling es una continua defensa a la diversidad de criaturas y sus protagonistas abogan por temas como la abolición de la esclavitud (en el caso de los elfos domésticos), la defensa de los más débiles (contra la exterminación de los muggles) y la lucha contra el autoritarismo de Voldemort. La mayor parte de estos mensajes no calan en la infancia, sino durante las revisiones que hacen los adultos de una de sus sagas favoritas. Por eso no hay vergüenza en confesarse fan de Harry Potter a los treinta, quizá incluso más que a los once.

Hacerlo no significa dar un portazo a la alta cultura ni usar los siete tomos como los mandamientos de la vida cotidiana. Sino reconocer que, hace veinte años, una joven escritora consiguió algo complejo y admirable: dotar de relevancia moral e histórica a un libro que caería en las manos de las mentes del futuro. 


          Markets, Economy, Republican Debates – Ep. 117   
When I recorded my last video blog, I mentioned how positively the market reacted to jobs report, which could signal the Fed to raise rates I said there might be a delayed reaction and, in fact it did Four days into this trading week we are down more than 450 points Also, I did an interview on CNBC.com where I said I felt the retail markets would have a a tough time this Christmas That was translated into headlines that I stated that consumers would have a horrible Christmas, which was not my point So far, my prediction about the retail space is bearing out, bad earnings reports from Macy's Walmart, Men's Wearhouse, and its subsidiary, Joseph A. Bank, Nordstrom and Neiman Marcus The data that the Fed depends on is getting worse and worse If the Fed raises rates in December, it will prove that they have not been data dependent, they were delaying Copper a six-month low today, oil prices are down, gold hit a new low inter-day but rallied back and the dollar finished broadly lower for the day Based on these market prices, the Fed will have another excuse to delay rate hikes, again What will stop the stock market from falling? The only thing that will stop it is if the Fed takes a rate hike off the table I recently wrote a commentary where I reference the shadow rate Tightening actually began about 18 months ago when the Fed started tapering The Fed's monetary policy is not just about rates, it is also about easing and foreward guidance When the Fed began tapering they were tightening When they began talking about raising rates that was the equivalent of tightening, because the markets braced for the hikes That's why the economy is rolling over, that's why the stock market is rolling over Given how weak this recovery has been and the enormity of the stimulus required, if the Fed removes all stimulus it will result in a worse than normal reaction in this over-valued stock market compared to previous tightening cycles More evidence of the weakening economy is the number of millennials still living with their parents is at a record high I posted a Bloomberg article on my Facebook page about the number of young women living at home is the highest in 70b years Bloomberg prefaces the article by stating that this is not a sign of a weak economy, but clearly it is This also affects housing: Couples are delaying buying "starter homes" which delays or prevents them from saving up for a down payment on their dream house I also wanted to discuss the Fox Business Republican Debate I believe Rand Paul was actually the winner of that debate Paul stood out, and made some good points, which allowed him to move forward in the polls Paul is drawing a contrast, as he made the point that the real threat to the U.S. is not a military threat from the outside, but the self-inflicted threat of a weak economy Our debt is a bigger enemy than ISIS Paul also avoided jumping on the immigration bandwagon. Immigration is not the problem. If we turn off the welfare magnet, then the only people who come to America will be the people who want to work The country would benefit from that, because it will keep labor costs down and boost productivity The anti-immigrant voice of the Republican party will be vilified as racist in the general election
          Avocado toast with mortgage? Yep, it's a thing   

Millennials collectively groaned when a millionaire gave them some advice: Stop buying avocado toast if you want to buy a home. An online lender is playing on that meme, offering the pricey toast with a mortgage.


          4 Ways Millennials Are Influencing Change In Project Portfolio Management   
Currently, PPM is being redefined and reworked as an institution by millennials, and understanding these shifts is critical if you want your PPM program to remain competitive.
          Know Your Archives 2: Archives II (NARA-College Park)   
Cara Burnidge

For the past month, I've been thinking about American religion in the world. Following RAAC 2017, I drove to College Park, Maryland for three weeks of research at the National Archives at College Park (or, Archives II).  Every other year, the Society for Historians of American Foreign Relations meets in D.C. and many members (myself included) use these D.C. years to do research. Two birds, one travel expense stone. Building off of Lauren's fantastic review of this year's SHAFR meeting and Mike's Know Your Archives: NARA edition, I'd like to give everyone a few more tips for researching at Archives II in College Park (where State Department records are held) and share some very important news for any colleagues working on the World War I era. 

First, who should consider researching at A2 or writing about religion in US  foreign relations? Anyone who's research interests intersect with the US government's actions abroad. As I wrote in Religious Influences in American Foreign Policy for ORE, "Any civilian who served as an informant, as a formal or informal diplomat, or who aided in creating policy decisions will intersect with NARA. Any federal employee who appealed to a religious figure, group, or event to aid in the implementation of foreign relations will also intersect with NARA." So...lots of us.

Next, how can you make the most of a trip to A2?



1.) Write to the archivists before your visit. Mike gave this tip, it's listed on the NARA "Plan Your Research Visit" page, and on this helpful Archival Survival Guide , but I'm reiterating it here anyway. Why? A.) Archivists are your best friend. The records related to U.S. foreign relations are complicated. The arrangement and documentation styles within the archives have changed over the years--leading scholars to cite the same records in different ways, assuming they are cited correctly in the first place--so you will need the expertise of archivists to locate the stuff you're interested, especially if you've never been there before. It's in your best interest to keep a running list of the citations that inspired your work and bring that with you. (I recommend you do so electronically, but more on that later). Basically, record organization and the retrieval process are not intuitive, so don't try to be a hero and go it alone. You'll still find plenty of material on your own, but the archivists will be able to navigate you to better sources. Trust them. Lean on them.

Why else should you write the archivists in advance? B.) Because I didn't do it and you should learn from my mistake. To explain: two years ago (the last time when SHAFR was in D.C.), I did write in advance, but on that trip I wasn't able to make it through my entire checklist. So, I didn't write in advance this time around. I planned on finishing the list I had already created. I was wrong to do that. That was a terrible idea. And here's the important news for fellow early 20th century historians:
For the anniversary of World War I, NARA digitized the American Commission to Negotiate Peace Records (RG 256)! The ACNP represented the U.S. at the Paris Peace Conference. All of their documents, 277 linear feet--which two years ago were available via microfilm [M820]--are now available to download as pdfs. Game. changer.
Did this make my trip useless? Not in the slightest. It meant that I could refocus my attention on entirely different records because I can go through M820 from the comfort of home.

2.) Bring a quarter. You are restricted in what you can bring into the research rooms. A2 has lockers available to use, but they require a quarter.  If you're a millennial ruining the world like me, then you might not be carrying any cash. A heads up my help.

3.) Stay hydrated. You obvi aren't allowed to take food and drink into the research rooms, so remember to get up and out of the room and hydrate. I got in a serious [nerdy] zone on several days and just didn't eat lunch or drink water. There is a I ended up hitting rush hour traffic hangry and dehydrated. Not a good look.

8.) It's a marathon, not a sprint [even if you're there only for a short time]. It's in your best interest to spend the whole day there, because there are scheduled pull times (M-F 10AM, 11AM, 1 PM, 2PM, & 3PM; no pulls on Saturday). After a couple of days, I worked out a much better system that didn't leave me hangry. I would start out the day early, bringing my phone, headphones, and researcher card with me to the research rooms. When my battery got low, I would head back down to the basement locker rooms (through the stairs not the elevators to stretch my legs), eat a snack and hydrate, then head back up with my portable charger in tow. It might take a day or two to figure out how it can work for you.

5.) Transportation & Accommodation. For the second time, I stayed at an AirB&B about a mile from A2. But whether you are nearby or not, there are plenty of public transit options to get you there and low cost places to stay. Which leads to another hot tip:

6.) If you can, don't go during the summer. Summers seem to be perfect because many of us are not teaching or have more limited teaching assignments, but that's precisely why another time is better. A2 can be more crowded during the summer, especially the week before and after SHAFR. Tour groups, summer camps, etc. can cause the staff to be stretched a little thin and less likely to give you as much time and attention as they could at other times during the year (see #1).

7.) Digitize your work flow. Like most research facilities, you are limited in what you can bring into the research rooms. Whenever you leave the research area, security will check your belongings. Any loose papers need to get a stamp of approval for you to carry in and out of the research area. I preferred to avoid that hassle, so I scanned any loose notes I needed and used a Google sheet with my running "look list". Free wifi makes Google Drive, Dropbox, and other online platforms easy to use. If this isn't your thing, though, that's okay too. There are plenty of people who bring flat bed scanners, their laptops, and various chargers with them into the rooms. There are carts available for you to use if that's the case. Whatever your flow looks like, don't be surprised if you're spending your time scanning and taking pictures for hours. Most people I talked to at SHAFR reported as much.

While you're getting beyond the loose paper, don't forget that there are more than just textual records to look at. There are maps, photos, films, and various audio recordings. Just when you think you've looked all you can look at, there will be more to possibly look at. But that's the joy and the frustration of researching at A2. FWIW, I think it helps to have a clear sense of your project and defined search priorities before arriving. It helps me, at least, from feeling too overwhelmed with all the possibilities to explore.

8) Finally, keep in mind that you might be able to do research from home. (See #1) If you're doing military research (Free research for Revolutionary Era records through July 15th!) or interested in any topic on this list of digitized microfilm, then you are in luck. If you don't find anything there, then you can browse by topic here or search the Foreign Relations of the United States here.




          Why the generation after millennials will vote Republican   
ERIE, PA — Max Bloomstine has a positive view of the nation’s growing diversity, believes the American dream is attainable (but doesn’t believe he’s entitled to it) and is more into the “we” instead of the “me.” He is politically independent but leans conservative, attends church on a regular basis, and views his parents — not sports figures or celebrities — as role models. Right now, though, two things weigh heavily on his mind: where to attend college next year (It’s either going to be the University of Pittsburgh or Rochester) and working on a summer job. “I am a...
          True Story: College Snowflake Makes Asinine Argument That MILK is Racist   
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Once again the Liberals have found something new to b*tch about. Now apparently they have issues with all milk… because it’s white or white people drink it… or… or. Oh hell! Just read this and get ready to laugh. Samantha Diaz, a staff writer for California State University-Long Beach’s student newspaper The Daily 49er, wrote an article claiming that white supremacists and neo-Nazis are now using milk as a symbol of hate. When you think of milk, do you think of racism or “nationalism”? Diaz explains why you should. When you think of milk, what first comes to your mind? If you’re a millennial, you probably think of strong bones, Got Milk? commercials, or maybe eating your favorite cereal while watching cartoons on a Saturday morning. What about racism? White nationalism? If you’re having trouble finding the connection between these institutions and milk, you’re not alone. You, along with the rest of the nation, have been so accustomed to hearing the benefits of milk that you probably didn’t even realize the subtle racism hidden in our health facts. Diaz then argues that the federal government’s endorsement of milk as a beneficial part of the country’s diet “contributes to the problem by uncritically pushing people to drink milk, despite the potential detriment it has on non-white people’s health.” Still confused? She states that because African-Americans do not suffer from osteoporosis at the same rates as most Americans, the United States is promoting a racist agenda. Does that mean they can’t benefit from milk at all? It’s pretty ridiculous to say that. She also says that the trolls at 4chan who hijacked Shia LaBeouf’s “He Will Not Divide Us” shtick, drank milk to counter-protest him as a means of imposing white supremacy on the actor. …Is Shia LaBeouf not white? A quick Google search (so you know we are getting the most Liberal version) says that LaBeouf is Jewish and Cajun, which is white. So, is it white supremacy because of his half Jewish side? We’re confused by Diaz’s logic. Diaz alludes to a scene in the new blockbuster hit Get Out where a white woman drinks a glass of milk with a bendy straw. She claims the film “highlights racism in post-racial America” and citing that as additional evidence that milk represents a status symbol for white supremacists. So a movie. She’s basing this on what a movie tells her… She also cites a Mother Jones article to further justify her assertions: The Mother Jones article states that not only is milk non-beneficial to Africans, but following the guidelines may actually be detrimental to their health. There is a strong correlation to calcium consumption and an increased risk of prostate cancer, unproportionally affecting African men. Furthermore, both black children and adults generally secrete less calcium on a daily basis than white people, making them less dependent upon milk. Give. Me. A. BREAK! Is this the craziest thing you’ve heard all day?
          Millennial Missionaries   

“Quinn and Kylie, millennial missionaries to the scuba instructors of Aruba, are seeking your financial support” reads the caption to comedian John Crist’s hilarious sketch on young millennials called to the vacatio-cough- mission field. Millennial or not, most of us living in the 21st century Western World wouldn’t expect the potential of being thrown into […]

The post Millennial Missionaries appeared first on 105.1 LifeFM Bendigo.


          Helping Your Millennial Child Reconnect with God   

We’ll explore reasons why some Millennials are walking away from their Christian faith, and what parents can do to help them reconnect with Jesus. We’ll also offer hope and encouragement to parents who have regrets about being poor role-models for their kids. Part 1 Part 2

The post Helping Your Millennial Child Reconnect with God appeared first on 105.1 LifeFM Bendigo.


          ABC = Always Be Closing Collaborating   
Author: 
Galina Sheveleva

The ‘ABC: Always be Closing’ mantra has been drilled into the minds of sales teams. In Glengarry Glen Ross, Blake passionately proclaimed: more closing equals higher commission, and if you can’t close, “hit the bricks, pal!” 

However, a lot has changed in the business world since 1992, and a different kind of sales strategy has emerged – one that can help you close more deals AND benefit your organization as a whole: ABC...Always Be Collaborating.

“Coming together is the beginning, keeping together is progress. Working together is success.” – Henry Ford

The Buying Evolution  

The evolution of buying has made it harder for sales teams to do their job in a silo. The B2B world has experienced a shift in the way buyers engage with vendors. Gone are the days of simple, fast, and transactional sales!

Now, sales teams deal with more complex sales cycles and, to close, they have to get buy-in from numerous stakeholders. According to CEB, 5.4 is the average number of participants, representing different roles and priorities, that are involved in a purchase decision. 

            Source: CEB - The Continuous Evolution of the B2B Buying Journey

This trend translates directly into how the RFP process has evolved: multiple buying groups now submit requirements to assess and select the best vendor. As a result, sales teams have to do more than just build a business case for the immediate users; they also have to satisfy the IT team, security or compliance team, management team, and procurement team – each with their own priorities. 

The way companies sell should reflect this change in the buying journey. To address all the requirements of the many stakeholders involved in purchasing, vendors need to bring in corresponding parties into the sales cycle. For example, to satisfy the buyer’s security requirements, the sales professional should bring in their internal security & compliance team to help answer the customer’s questions and address concerns. 

Salesforce’s "State of Sales" report highlights this, showing that 68% of B2B sales teams see collaboration as being instrumental to their success. The report also indicates, “60% of sales professionals say that collaborative selling has increased productivity by more than 25%, and more than half (52%) say it has done the same for increasing pipeline.”

Source: Salesforce - State of Sales

From Old ABC to New ABC: Creating a Culture of Collaboration

Start with People 

Employees are a company’s most valuable asset. However, traditional team layouts – those based on roles – often push teams to work in silos, leading to disengagement. 

On the contrary, mixed team structures can help increase collaboration. Gallup, in their State of the American Workplace reporthighlighted the rising number of matrixed teams, “The prevalence of matrixed teams isn’t surprising. Organizations have come under pressure to be more responsive to customer needs and a quickly evolving marketplace.” According to their research, 34% of employees on highly matrixed teams “strongly agree that being on different teams helps them collaborate more effectively with coworkers.” 

However, the report notes that employees on highly matrixed teams are less likely than those on traditional teams to have role clarity. This is why organizational alignment is so important. 

A simple Google Search for “marketing and sales alignment” (we call it “Smarketing” at Loopio) brings up over 17 million results! But what about alignment with the rest of the organization? 

“When employees understand their overall role in business, 91% will work toward its success. But when they don’t, that figure drops sharply to 23%.” – Bill Quirke, Communications Expert 

Alignment starts with an understanding of how every role in the organization adds value to the customer’s purchase experience. Even though sales teams are on the front lines, every department plays a part in contributing to these goals. And if selling means providing value to the customer, then everybody in an organization is, in fact, selling! 

This holds true at Loopio. When we receive an RFP, we pull in subject matter experts (SMEs) from different departments to provide accurate and up-to-date responses. For example, we pull in our Technology team for any security and compliance questions and our Customer Success team for questions on implementation and roll-outs. Who better to answer the questions than the experts themselves! Our sales team knows they can rely on other teams to help them sell.  

Continue with Compensation and Rewards

Compensation drives behavior. While a lot of sales professionals receive commission and bonuses solely for closing deals, most other teams in the organizations receive fixed salaries. This type of compensation structure does little to encourage cooperation between different teams. 

According to a study published in HBR, “When it comes to hires, promotions, and nonfinancial recognition, past performance is two or three times more likely than a track record of collaboration to be rewarded with a promotion.” 

Since employees are mainly rewarded for their own accomplishments, it is only natural for them to focus on their own goals, as opposed to the team or company goals. The reality is, most employees won’t collaborate if there is nothing in it for them.  

To foster collaboration, executives can offer profit-sharing or stock options and team-based rewards. These types of incentives align all employees on the growth of the business. An articlein Chief Executive Magazine notes the rise of team-based incentives across organizations. It goes on to say, “The changes come as business leaders acknowledge that sales is a team effort [...] involving multiple functions such as lead generation, proposal writing, technical support and account management.” 

There are different incentive types that can drive collaborative behavior; some will work better than others for your organization. 

Incorporate Technology 

Global teams, remote work options, increasingly millennial workforce – how do you collaborate effectively considering all these factors? With the help of technology. 

Technology plays a crucial role in enabling collaboration. There’s a reason why Slack has experienced such tremendous growth – it has allowed companies to take collaboration to the next level by allowing easier communication across different teams and devices. Platforms, such as Slack, help busy sales teams that are on the go stay engaged and connected to other teams. 

Technology enables easier communication and collaboration. Every team in an organization has unique expertise and knowledge. Without technology to help connect it all, it’s just fragmented information scattered throughout the organization.

With technology, you can create a repository of company knowledge so that sales teams can find necessary information quickly and efficiently and leverage it in their interactions with customers. When information is easily accessible, you spend less time hunting down information and more time providing quick and accurate responses to various customer requests. Having a single and accessible platform where teams can share and maintain documents and information is a big step towards effective collaboration. 

We use Loopio as a repository of knowledge and a ‘single source of truth’. We all contribute to maintaining it so that our sales team always has access to the most up-to-date information. 

Summary

With increasingly complex sales cycles, the success of the sales teams rests on their ability to collaborate effectively with other employees. As a sales person, you know how to sell your company’s products or services, but you still need other teams’ expertise to successfully address the wide range of customer concerns that is becoming typical for the procurement process. 

To achieve collaboration, executives need to: 

  • seek alignment with other departments
  • rethink compensation and incentive structures
  • find technology solutions that foster collaboration and knowledge sharing

“It is the long history of humankind (and animal kind, too) that those who learned to collaborate and improvise most effectively have prevailed.” – Charles Darwin


          Comment on Private dental care fails millions in Ontario by colin goodfellow   
The ongoing misrepresentation of provider ownership structure (public vrs private) and access and coverage is unhelpful. This deliberate confusion/ conflation of these distinct attributes is one of the main reasons the public provision of health services in Ontario and ROC is so difficult to improve and continues to fall further behind in the OECD tables. The defintional confusion is driven and funded by stakeholder's self interest in the "public" provider/ payer health system. Shame for putting self interest ahead of collective interests as progressives continue the decade and a half slide into being a reactionary voice. I can only hope that millennials will see through this ruse and begin to move forward again.
          More Americans saving money for emergencies   

Way to go, savers! There are more of you out there, putting more money away in case of a financial emergency.

Only 24 percent of adults now say they have no money saved for an emergency such as a layoff or a huge medical bill, according to Bankrate’s June Financial Security Index survey. That’s the lowest level since polling began in 2011.

Also, 31 percent have what’s considered an adequate savings cushion: enough to cover six months’ worth of expenses or more. That’s the highest Bankrate has seen in the seven years we’ve been asking about that.

But, looking at the flip side, the findings mean about a quarter of Americans still don’t have any emergency fund. And more than two-thirds are short on savings.

If you’re in either of those groups, it’s time to get on board!

Barely saving can be just as bad as not socking away anything. Blair and Ryan Critch of Fort Lauderdale, Fla., learned that the hard way.

When the housing market crashed, they lost everything and had to file for bank­ruptcy. Back then, they had emergency savings to cover just two months.

“We wish we had had more money saved up in the bank,” Blair Critch said.

She became a network marketing expert, and her husband opened a real estate office, Ocean400 International Realty. Now with eight months’ worth of emergency savings and over a million dollars in earnings, the couple are teaching their sons the value of saving for a rainy day.

Building an emergency fund starts with automating your savings.

“You have to be in the habit of regularly contributing to your savings, ideally, with a direct deposit from each and every paycheck,” said Greg McBride, Bankrate’s chief financial analyst.

Experts recommend having enough savings to cover expenses for three to six months. If you’re an entrepreneur or breadwinner, McBride says, you may need to save more.

Bankrate’s survey finds 1 in 5 adults has some savings but not enough to pay the bills for the three-month minimum.

To help you reach the three-month savings target, put any extra money you make into a high-yield savings or money market account. If you get a bonus at work, for example, avoid the temptation to upgrade your house or car, says financial planner Brian White, president and owner of Century Financial.

“Save the entire amount and continue to live as if you never got a bonus,” he said.

Moving up the ladder, 17 percent of Americans have enough savings to cover three to five months’ worth of expenses. Younger millennials — those between ages 18 and 26 — are most likely to fall into this camp.

“A lot of them (millennials) have seen their parents suffer financially through the recession, and so they are trying to be savvier with their money,” said con­sumer savings expert Andrea Woroch.

That leaves the group maintaining adequate savings, enough to cover expenses for at least six months. The survey shows it represents 31 percent of Americans — the highest in seven years.

To take your emergency savings to the next level, Woroch suggested doing freelance work or selling unwanted items. Comparison-­shopping and couponing offer other ways to save money and grow your rainy day fund.

Consider investing in a certificate of deposit as well. Compare deals among the top CD rates.

If you’re struggling to save for emergencies and retirement at the same time, find out whether you can open a Roth IRA.

“You can always use the Roth IRA to pull out any contributions you have made at any given time that’s tax-free and that’s penalty-free,” said investment adviser Brent Sutherland, owner of Ntellivest.

Bankrate’s Financial Security Index itself has reached an all-time high, reflecting the confidence that recently led the Federal Reserve to hike interest rates for the third time in six months.

The index tracks Americans’ job security, net worth, comfort levels with their savings and debt, and overall financial situation. All five components show improvement from last June and last month.

The net worth reading is the strongest ever, with Americans who say their net worth is higher than a year ago outnumbering those who say it’s lower by a ratio of 3 to 1.

The survey was conducted by Princeton Survey Research Associates International. PSRAI obtained telephone interviews with a nationally representative sample of 1,003 adults living in the continental United States. Interviews were conducted June 1-4. The margin of sampling error for the complete set of weighted data is plus or minus 3.7 percentage points.

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          There Is Now A Unicorn Oreo & I Hate Myself For Wanting One   
There's also an avocado Oreo, in news unrelated to millennials buying houses.
          New Statistical Analysis Looks at Outcomes and Experiences of Early Millennials (U.S.) as Young Adults   
The following research report was released earlier today by the National Center for Education Statistics. Title Early Millennials: The Sophomore Class of 2002 a Decade Later Source National Center for Education Statistics Background/Highlights By 2012, 96 percent of students who were high school sophomores in 2002 had completed high school, 84 percent of them had […]
          Bartender/Bar Manager - Pane e Bene Restaurant LLC - Westport, CT   
Professional female bartender with some experience, a fan energetic person with upscale clientele and millennials client experience. High school or equivalent....
From Indeed - Tue, 27 Jun 2017 19:04:34 GMT - View all Westport, CT jobs
          General Manager   
Duwun.com.mm is a product of a Joint-Venture Digital Media company between biggest media giants in Swtizerland and Myanmar, Ringier AG and Information Matrix respectively. Our news and entertainment teams serve millennial of highly engaged generation in Myanmar who will be only consuming more video and content across platforms, on mobile with our experienced engineering team focused on giving the optimum user experience for readers. • Be responsible for leading the project from planning, management, implementation and monitoring of the project, and for managing project resources effectively and efficiently • Collaborate with business stakeholders and project team to ensure project deliverables on schedule • Monitor, analyze and maintain an overview of the progress of project implementation to ensure timely result delivery • Understand Myanmar market to build up strategic plan and media products • Manage daily activities of projects • Coordinate closely with the local teams (content team, marketing team, digital marketing team, events team and production team) to deliver media products and build up product brand. • Make recommendations to management about schedules, prioritization and resource allocation as needed • Reports on project progress and accomplishments, and help to resolve or appropriately escalate key issues or concerns • Recruit and manage team members as required • Ensure project budget is met
          Here’s why a new study shows more millennials are having strokes   
LOS ANGELES (FOX NEWS) — A new study shows millennials are having strokes more than ever before and the reason health officials are blaming will shock you. Constantly checking social media and eating fast food and not exercising are just some of the lifestyle choices doctors say are putting millennials more at risk for a stroke. “I really didn’t even know stroke was an issue, I never thought about that their might be a stroke because of my social media […]
          Weekend Radio Schedule and the Best of the Week’s Bootlegs   
8c1b125f64b2ca3100cfb23c1caeb27fbf8d026cb48183f3426c2e09250b3e73
The Best of the Week’s Bootleg Audio

Download Florian Geyer and Guests – Mysterium Fasces - Episode 32 - 2 hours 40 minutes
Download Michael Hoffman 2 - Noahide Laws – 55 minutes
Download E Michael Jones - Dionysos Rising - The Cultural Revolution and the Spirit of Music Part 2 – 1 hour 5 minutes
Download Jared Taylor Debates R.A. the Rugged Man on Race – 1 hour 10 minutes
Download Nordic Frontiers 23 –  A Glorious Return  - 2 hours

Weekend Radio Schedule

Saturday July 01


Part 1
12pm EDT/5pm BST
Download Florian Geyer and Guests – Mysterium Fasces - Episode 32 - 2 hours 40 minutes

Part 2
3pm EDT/8pm BST
Download Sven Longshanks and SubalSS Britannia: Rotten to the Core – SS 062617 – 1 hour
Download Michael Hoffman 1 - Judaism's Strange Gods – 1 hour 5 minutes
Download England Rising - Age of Vengeance - Radical Instinct – 55 minutes
 

Saturday July 01

Part 1
6pm EDT/11pm BST
Download Sven LongshanksMerchants of Sin: Jews and Film – AN 062617 - 35 minutes
Download Michael Hoffman 2 - Noahide Laws – 55 minutes
Richard Spencer, Hunter Wallace, James Edwards – The Satanic Verses – 1 hour 10 minutes



Part 2
9pm EDT/2am BST
Download Grandpa LampshadeThoughts of the Day: Correcting the Balance – GL 062817  - 1 hour
Download Bishop Williamson -The Synagogue and the JWO – 1 hour
Download E Michael Jones - Dionysos Rising - The Cultural Revolution and the Spirit of Music Part 1 – 1 hour

Sunday July 02

Part 1
12am EDT/5am BST
Download Sven LongshanksMerchants of Sin: Jews and Porn – AN 062717 - 40 minutes
Download Michael Hoffman 3 - Bible Nullification and Jesus in the Talmud – 1 hour
Download Anne Marie Waters - Feltham - 2nd June 2017- 25 minutes
Download Mark Collett - Grenfell - the Lefts Hypocrisy EXPOSED – 15 minutes
Download Subal - What The Hell Is Going On With (((TRS))) – 15 minutes
Download The Don - Irish Navy Is Providing a Ferry Service For Migrants Into Europe – 15 minutes

Part 2
3am EDT/8am BST
Download Matt JohnsonThe Orthodox Nationalist: Putin – TON 062817 – 1 hour
Download E Michael Jones - Dionysos Rising - The Cultural Revolution and the Spirit of Music Part 2 – 1 hour 5 minutes
Download Jez Turner - Collection Of Speeches - 50 minutes

Sunday July 02

Part 1
6am EDT/11am BST
Download Sven Longshanks and Matt Johnson – The Daily Traditionalist: The Great Schema – DT 062917 – 30 minutes
Download Michael Hoffman 4 - The Constitution The Talmud & The King James Bible – 50 minutes
Download Jonathan Bowden - Cultural Communism Conceptual Art and Stewart Home – 1 hour 5 minutes
Download Millennial Woes - The Alt-Right and the Alt-Lite - 25 minutes

Part 2
9am EDT/2pm BST
Download Harold CovingtonRadio Free Northwest: Price-Tag Attack Army to the Rescue – RFN 062717 – 1 hour
Download Jared Taylor Debates R.A. the Rugged Man on Race – 1 hour 10 minutes
Download The Don - Mueller Now Investigating President Trump For Obstruction - Was It A Comey Setup - 40 minutes

Sunday July 02

Part 1
12pm EDT/5pm BST
Download Sven Longshanks and Matt Johnson – The Daily Traditionalist: The Great Schema – DT 062917 – 30 minutes
Download Michael Hoffman 5 - Spiritual and Physical Israel – 50 minutes
Download Germar Rudolf - Exposing Auschwitz Curated Lies – 1 hour 25 minutes

Part 2
3pm EDT/8pm BST
Download Sven Longshanks and Matt Johnson – The Daily Traditionalist: The Great Schema – DT 062917 – 30 minutes
Download Nordic Frontiers 23 –  A Glorious Return - 2 hours

Sunday July 02

Part 1

6pm EDT/11pm BST
Download Florian Geyer and Guests – Mysterium Fasces - Episode 32 - 2 hours 40 minutes

Part 2
9pm EDT/2am BST
Download Sven Longshanks and SubalSS Britannia: Rotten to the Core – SS 062617 – 1 hour
Download Michael Hoffman 1 - Judaism's Strange Gods – 1 hour 5 minutes
Download England Rising - Age of Vengeance - Radical Instinct – 55 minutes
 

Monday July 03

Part 1
12am EDT/5am BST
Download Sven LongshanksMerchants of Sin: Jews and Film – AN 062617 - 35 minutes
Download Michael Hoffman 2 - Noahide Laws – 55 minutes
Richard Spencer, Hunter Wallace, James Edwards – The Satanic Verses – 1 hour 10 minutes



Part 2
3am EDT/8am BST
Download Grandpa LampshadeThoughts of the Day: Correcting the Balance – GL 062817  - 1 hour
Download Bishop Williamson -The Synagogue and the JWO – 1 hour
Download E Michael Jones - Dionysos Rising - The Cultural Revolution and the Spirit of Music Part 1 – 1 hour

Monday July 03

Part 1
6am EDT/11pm BST
Download Sven LongshanksMerchants of Sin: Jews and Porn – AN 062717 - 40 minutes
Download Michael Hoffman 3 - Bible Nullification and Jesus in the Talmud – 1 hour
Download Anne Marie Waters - Feltham - 2nd June 2017- 25 minutes
Download Mark Collett - Grenfell - the Lefts Hypocrisy EXPOSED – 15 minutes
Download Subal - What The Hell Is Going On With (((TRS))) – 15 minutes
Download The Don - Irish Navy Is Providing a Ferry Service For Migrants Into Europe – 15 minutes

Part 2
9am EDT/2pm BST
Rense Don Black – Stormfront Radio – LIVE – 2 hours
11am EDT/4pm BST
Rense Dr David Duke Show – LIVE – 1 hour

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          How to have your Espresso Martini AND save for a deposit!   

While Espresso Martinis and smashed avo are eating into your savings, it doesn’t mean that millennials should give up on..

The post How to have your Espresso Martini AND save for a deposit! appeared first on Beyond Bank Blog.


          Time to ask what technology should be in the home of older adults?   

Tech-enabling home care is one lens on future of care.  Venture capitalists listen carefully for trends fueled by talk in the media.  During the past several years, they heard plenty -- about the longevity economy and an investment-related network, digital health watchers like Rock Health and Startup Health 'moonshots', and all things boomer and their tech interest about the future. So they saw home care as a growth opportunity.  Buried in and mostly around the wave of investment and media interest in boomers (oldest age in 2017 is 71), the tech industry also noodled a bit more about the over-hyped Internet of Things, emerging voice recognition technologies, and technology adoption trends (everybody except for those aged 75+).

Are care recipients tech-enabled enough to participate in their care? Despite the tech fluff cycle, some people, particularly older adults, may just not be buying the fact that the future is on their phone.  Discounting smartphone carrier plans and the useful irritant/irritating utility of the phones themselves still doesn’t penetrate the oldest age segments. That may be what fueled flip-phone sales in 2015 and what keeps that device segment buzzing along. What other technology for an older population may have had a better chance of success if inventors and innovators had looked more broadly at the target market?

Ecosystems matter – note those for the older adult segments. Considering price and simplicity, it is striking that so many consumer offerings enter the marketplace neither simple nor properly priced – meanwhile the consumer tech industry growth is slowing – not just in smartphones and tablets, but all tech -- software and hardware. Per that Accenture survey, no surprise, price points, security breaches, and ease of use (or lack thereof) matter to consumers. As is often the case with market research, the report does not break down age categories about this stalling growth, but in the advice section, it notes the importance of ecosystems. That means partnerships among the user constituents, between senior housing companies and home care, between health care providers and home care, between home service companies and online marketplaces -- and related service offerings.

A year later – time for revision to the Market Overview of Technology for Aging in Place. This annually-updated report will be reviewed during February for what has changed; what no longer matters; and what firms, including startups, may matter over the next year to the older adult market segments.  If you have thoughts – please bring them forward about any new offerings in the categories of communication and engagement, home safety and security, health and wellness, learning and contribution, dementia care, home care, and caregiving apps. And if you think categories are missing or no longer matter, please speak up!


          Insurance CEO wants to hire more millennials   
Share This Article: Source: The Standard Insurance CEO wants to hire more millennials
          This week in science: hold the pickles   

Tunicates are odd forms of phyla Chordata, superficially similar to vertebrates in terms of evolution and development. Most look about as dumb and plant-like as it’s possible to be and still technically be a metazoan animal. The colonial forms, like the sea pickles, may descend from ancient lines. But here’s something new in their behavior:

Ric Brodeur, a research biologist at the NOAA’s Northwest Fisheries Science Center in Newport, Ore., said that beachcombers in Oregon have been walking the beaches there for decades, but he has started getting reports of pyrosomes washing up on the beaches only in the past few months. He has also been going to sea on research cruises since the 1980s and saw his first pyrosome only in 2014. He believes the high abundance is related to unusually warm ocean conditions along the coast that resembles pyrosomes' normal habitat.

Gosh, I wonder what could possibly be causing warmer oceans? And how can science ever be sure to be an arbitrary, 100 percent metaphysical godlike certainty anyway?

  • No, no, no: Anonymous did not hack secret NASA evidence about hidden alien life.
  • Scientists say up to a third of the marine megafauna might have gone extinct a few million years ago, leaving the resultant population familiar to us a lot less rich than it was. One like culprit was changing coastlines during a global climate shift …
  • Silicon Hills, aka Austin, gets a tech shout out in The Hill:

In just three decades, the Austin region has transformed from a sleepy university and state government town into a national driver of economic activity and innovation. We are a destination city for entrepreneurs, millennials and breakfast taco aficionados.

Then there’s a third option which is gaining ground in some scientific circles, panpsychism. In this view, the entire universe is inhabited by consciousness. A handful of scientists are starting to warm to this theory, but it’s still a matter of great debate.


          Finally, a breezy novel about a millennial who doesn’t take herself too seriously   
Trisha Bora brings to light the hazy, bright chaos of being in your early twenties in 21st Century India.
          Verse, el fintech de pago móvil que pretende revolucionar el sistema de transacciones   

En 2015 tres jóvenes emprendedores españoles de entre 20 y 23 años: Borja Rossell, Álex Lopera y Dario Nieuwenhuis se propusieron impulsar la modernización del sistema de pagos sirviéndose de las nuevas tecnologías. Para ello diseñaron una aplicación fintech que permitiera enviar y recibir dinero desde el móvil de forma instantánea, sencilla y sin comisiones. Así nació Verse, una app 100% segura que elimina intermediarios durante las transacciones.

Verse permite que el dinero pase de un usuario a otro de manera directa e inmediata, gracias a su tecnología Blockchain. También da la opción de crear eventos y grupos para los pagos en común. La app simplifica el proceso de enviar y recibir dinero, tan fácil como enviar un whatsapp, solo es necesario asociar una tarjeta de crédito o de débito a la aplicación, introducir el importe y darle al botón de enviar dinero al contacto o contactos correspondientes —de la lista de contactos del teléfono o añadiendo un número de teléfono—, que recibirán el dinero al instante en su cuenta de Verse.

A la inversa, para recibir dinero, el importe entra de manera inmediata como saldo en la cuenta de Verse que, a su vez, puede ser enviado a otro contacto o transferirse al banco añadiendo una cuenta bancaria. Los eventos podrán ser privados o públicos, de modo que será posible compartir y consultar la actividad de los contactos.

Su nombre proviene de Universe, "que sería nuestra máxima aspiración: que todo el mundo utilice nuestra aplicación para pagar y solicitar dinero a sus contactos", declaran sus fundadores.

INVERSIÓN Y CRECIMIENTO

La empresa ha levantado tres rondas de inversión. La primera a finales de 2015 por 1,5 millones de euros para el lanzamiento de la aplicación. Más adelante, y gracias a las buenas perspectivas de la compañía, se cerró una segunda ronda de inversión de 7,6 millones de euros destinada a impulsar el crecimiento de la empresa. La tercera y última el pasado mes de mayo por 18,5 millones de euros con el mismo objetivo de consolidar su posición en el mercado y abrirse a nuevos públicos, como empresas y establecimientos.

Verse es una app totalmente gratuita, al igual que todas las transacciones que se llevan a cabo a través de la aplicación, siempre y cuando no haya cambio de divisas. En un futuro, tienen previsto incorporar los pagos también con comercios y cobrar una comisión por ello. De momento, y gracias al capital recibido, Verse sigue creciendo con vistas a convertirse en el primer método de pago entre los millennials de Europa. Actualmente, Verse está disponible en 27 países con una base de usuarios creciente y un equipo de profesionales de 22 personas.

MÁS INFORMACIÓN

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          4 Tips for Managing Millennials   
The millennial generation has an undeservedly bad reputation in the workforce thanks to people who have little experience with this group nevertheless calling out the entire generation as lazy, entitled, and unwilling to pay their dues. This supposition is just a blatant misrepresentation when the truth is simply that they work differently than the generation before […]
          UX Designer   
Who you are:

*

You are self-motivated, hungry to produce excellent work, and have a love for the creating beautiful User experiences.
*

You deeply understand the sensibilities of millennial professionals who are our initial target audience.
*

You are excited by the idea of joining a startup - you like the fast-paced, somewhat ambiguous, somewhat chaotic life in a startup, and rapid iteration to delight users (without endless meetings, consensus building, or layers of management reviews in larger companies).

Requirements:

*

You have mastery of the basic principles of visual and interaction design, art, and typography.
*

You have mastery of creative design and prototyping tools, including Adobe CC and Sketch.
*

You have proficiency with HTML, CSS, and JavaScript (the more the better)
*

You are a quick learner. If there's something you don't know how to do, you know where to look or who to ask to get the information and become productive.
*

You have 3+ years of prior professional industry experience doing UI/UX work at a start-up or technology company.
          Getting divorced in Taiwan? From custody to child support, this is what you need to know   
(ChinaPost.com.tw) - This is the final installment of the “Millennials' Money Series,” a special report series that has dealt with millennials' job-switching trends, personal finance management, and other workplace and life issues that young people today are facing.
          Sen. Kamala Harris looking to conquer 2020 presidential election for Democrats   

[USA], July 2 (ANI): Indian-origin Senator Kamala Harris, who has been in the news for the session regarding the Congressional testimony of Attorney General Jeff Sessions, is reportedly on a fund-raising drive for her Democratic colleagues ahead of the United States presidential elections in 2020.

In the first six months of 2017, Harris has raised more than USD 600,000 for a dozen Senate colleagues -- including USD 365,000 from small-dollar online contributions, reports CNN.

According to reports, Sen. Harris has also scheduled a tour later in the year to raise money for Democratic Senate incumbents as well as the challengers for seven Republican-held House seats in California that the party is targeting.

Sen. Harris's extensive campaign outweighs her Senate campaign, with a significant hold on social media. Her campaign also encompasses Facebook advertising after the election to help build that list and raise money.

Recently, she released a widely praised Spotify playlist to celebrate African-American Music Appreciation Month to Blavity, a site that targets black millennials.

Sen. Harris is likely to campaign and raise money for candidates who could benefit from her support -- potentially including Ohio Sen. Sherrod Brown -- and to focus on seven House seats in California held by Republicans, but where Hillary Clinton bested Trump in the 2016 election. (ANI)


          Sen. Kamala Harris looking to conquer 2020 presidential election for Democrats   
... help build that list and raise money. Recently, she released a widely praised Spotify playlist to celebrate African-American Music Appreciation Month to Blavity, a site that targets black millennials. Sen. Harris is likely to campaign and raise ...
          Alzheimers on the Rise with a Caregiver Shortage   

alzheimers disease

Alzheimer's is a devastating disease for the patient, their loved ones, and those who care for them. Unfortunately, Alzheimer's is on the rise at a time when there is a caregiver shortage. That means more responsibility falls on family members as they do their best to navigate this disease and the needs of their loved ones. Trends in Alzheimer's Currently, 5.5 million Americans suffer from Alzheimer's. While the progression of the disease differs from one person to another, all sufferers deal with some level of memory loss as well as the ability to care for themselves. What is most troubling is that deaths from Alzheimer's have increased by 55% between 1999 to 2014, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control. In addition, more people with this disease are dying at home. One reason for this increase is that the overall age of the U.S. population is increasing. Until recently, Baby Boomers were the largest segment of the population. They have now been outnumbered by Millennials. Download 7 Stages of Alzheimer's New Treatments for Alzheimer's One team of scientists in Canada are working to develop treatments that can actually break through the protective wall surrounding the brain known as the blood-brain barrier. This would allow the development of technologies that could deliver drugs to treat Alzheimer's directly to the brain. The downside is that once this protective barrier is pierced germs can also cross it. Research teams are faced with the challenge of discovering a way to allow drugs to cross the barrier while keeping harmful organisms out. Another group of scientists at the Salk Institute are working on a way to grow human astrocytes which are a type of brain cell in a dish. If they are successful this will allow them to study Alzheimer's in a whole new way. The Toll Alzheimer's Takes on Families With a shortage of caregivers in the United States, more family members are taking on the responsibility of caring for their loved ones with Alzheimer's. This can be especially difficult in the later stages of the disease when the patient cannot be left alone for even a short time period. In addition, many of these family members also work full-time jobs and have children to care for, too. This is a perfect storm that can lead to burnout and feelings of being overwhelmed. One solution is to engage the help of a qualified, professional caregiver. One issue with this solution is the shortage of professional caregivers. In fact, there will be a need for five million professional caregivers over the next seven years. Between now and 2024 an additional one million caregivers are needed. However, the population growth of women, who are the most traditional caregivers, will not keep up with that need. With a lack of caregivers available, this leads to the possibility of fewer qualified caregivers available for Alzheimer's patients and a possible increase in the death rate of these patients. Also, family members who care for their loved ones will deal with more stress and additional stress related diseases which can lead to more issues for the long-term. A shortage of professional caregivers and an increase in the number of Alzheimer's patients is a tragedy waiting to happen. Add the stress that comes from caring for a loved one with the disease and the country is at a tipping point. Do you know someone who is thinking of becoming a professional caregiver? What is their hesitation about becoming a caregiver? Let us know your story and theirs in the comments below.
      

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          5 cách tăng sự gắn kết cho kênh YouTube của bạn   

Như bạn đã biết, mỗi phút lại có hơn 300 giờ video được tải lên YouTube, và trong số đó, chỉ có rất ít video được chia sẻ, và lan truyền rộng rãi trong cộng đồng. Một khi được lan truyền, video sẽ nhận được những lượt xem một cách đều đặn, kể cả khi nó đã bớt “hot”. 5 cách tăng sự gắn kết cho kênh YouTube của bạn Đối với các nhà kinh doanh, hay marketer, bài toán làm sao để khán giả luôn gắn bó đối với kênh YouTube của thương hiệu luôn được đặt ra, bởi nó ảnh hưởng rất lớn đến chiến dịch quảng cáo của họ, sự nhận diện, hay cả doanh số cho sản phẩm. Làm sao để khán giả không tắt phụp video của bạn, khi mà nó chưa hề được xem hết, và thông điệp mà bạn muốn truyền tải chưa hề được chú ý, đó luôn là vấn đề đau đầu cho những người thực hiện video marketing. Không chỉ vậy, thời gian để một người chú ý đến cái gì đó chỉ là 8,25 giây ngắn ngủi, thậm chí còn ít hơn cả các chú cá vàng (9 giây). Như vậy, phải làm gì để gây ấn tượng ngay với người xem, và không kéo họ rời khỏi tab video đang bật trước mặt? Trong infographic được Vidooly tổng hợp và giới thiệu dưới đây,  bạn sẽ biết được thêm rằng 67% những người có thói quen mua sắm trên mạng (online shoppers) thường xem video về sản phẩm, trước khi đưa ra quyết định mua hàng. Có đến 75% lượt xem video là đến từ các thiết bị di động, và 92% trong số này có xu hướng chia sẻ video của họ qua các mạng xã hội. Yeah1 Network đã tạm dịch, và giới thiệu cùng các bạn bản Việt hóa của Inforgraphic 5 noteworthy ways to increase engagement on YouTube, mời các bạn cùng xem: * Millennials: Những người trẻ sinh ra trong khoảng từ năm 1980 đến 2000 * Một số các khái niệm chuyên môn được tạm dịch sang tiếng Việt: Gắn kết (Engagement), Chú ý (Retention), Thời lượng xem (Watch Time) Nguồn: Vidooly (Yeah1 Network tạm dịch).

The post 5 cách tăng sự gắn kết cho kênh YouTube của bạn appeared first on Kênh Kiến Thức.


          Siete clínicas estéticas fueron sancionadas por Susalud en el país - El Comercio   

El Comercio

Siete clínicas estéticas fueron sancionadas por Susalud en el país
El Comercio
En total, Susalud ha supervisado 15 clínicas y centros estéticos en varias regiones en lo que va del año. (Foto: Susalud). En total, Susalud ha supervisado 15 clínicas y centros estéticos en varias regiones en lo que va del año. (Foto: Susalud ...
Cirujanos plásticos saludan medidas del Ministerio de Salud PúblicaAlmomento.net
Susalud impuso medidas de seguridad en siete clínicas de cirugía plásticaDiario Gestión
Los varones millennials, a favor de la cirugía estéticaClarín.com

los 4 artículos informativos »

          Japanese whisky firms target millennials, trendy bars in New York   
In May, Suntory held a tasting event at an outlet of Japanese apparel company Maker’s Shirt Kamakura near Wall Street, targeting the brand loyalty of millennials, who were born between the early 1980s and late 1990s. Suntory’s Hibiki whisky, priced at around US$65 per bottle, proved very popular. A 30-year-old man who works in publishing said it would be a good gift, adding he gave a US$280 Japanese whisky to his father-in-law recently. “It’s a good opportunity to... Reported by S.China Morning Post 2 hours ago.
          Philanthropy Inspired   
The most astute organizations will find ways to offer experience, retreats, education and ultimately a rewarding valuable experience to major donors. These innovative methods of generating patrons will advance and become the gold standard for capturing the passionate audience of Millennials who live life based on following passion and seeking intrinsic personal rewards in everything they do; they will be inspired.
          Arts Journal - Words   

Millennials Are The Greatest Generation, At Least In Library-Going Terms

Yep. They’re more likely than Gen-X and Boomers – and way more likely than the Silent Generation – to visit the library. Maybe this is why? “Due in large part to libraries’ egalitarian nature, their events, teach-ins, and classes are free and open, making them natural hubs for underemployed millennials seeking skills to break out of their parents’ homes.” Also, of course, the books are free.

          Teile oder stirb! Warum wir wirklich so viele unserer Daten freiwillig preisgeben   

Beinahe sorglos verschenken wir unsere Daten an Google, Facebook und Amazon. Was für viele Menschen heute noch ihrem Mitteilungsdrang dient, könnte uns bald weniger lebendig machen.

Auf Google stellt man schnell fest, dass es Unkenrufe zum Ende des Datenschutzes schon seit Jahrzehnten gibt. Aber die Lage ist heute besonders paradox.

Das Vertrauen in Unternehmen ist generell auf einem Tiefpunkt, wenn man dem 2017-Edelman-Trust-Barometer Glauben schenken darf. Eine Umfrage von KPMG fand zudem heraus, dass sich 56 Prozent  der Befragten „besorgt“ oder „sehr besorgt“ zeigten über die Art und Weise, wie Firmen mit ihren Daten umgehen. Eine jüngste PwC-Studie ergab sogar, dass 79 Prozent der Online-Nutzer weniger bereit sind als noch vor einem Jahr, ihre Daten mit anderen zu teilen.

Jedoch folgen den Worten nur selten Taten. Die freiwillige Bereitstellung von persönlichen Daten hat entgegen aller Absichtserklärungen keinen Abbruch erlitten. Das Geschäft von digitalen Datensammlern- und Auswertern wie Amazon, Google oder Facebook boomt wie nie zuvor. Digitalen Assistenten wie Alexa flüstern wir unsere persönlichsten Daten nun sogar direkt ins Ohr. Warum?

3 Gründe, die auf der Hand liegen

Zum einen ist es unsere pure Ignoranz als Verbraucher. Viele von uns wissen einfach nicht, was mit unseren Daten geschieht, dass wir zum Beispiel Facebook das Recht zur übertragbaren, gebührenfreien und weltweiten Nutzung unserer persönlichen Fotos übertragen, wenn wir sie hochladen.

Zum anderen neigen wir, wie ja auch das Beispiel Klimawandel zeigt, zu kurzfristigem Denken und blenden die langfristigen Konsequenzen unseres Handelns aus. Da uns der Wert der oft als Interaktion getarnten Transaktion nicht unmittelbar bewusst ist, willigen wir wegen des augenblicklichen Nutzens oft allzu schnell ein. Die Folgen unserer impulsiven Online-Entscheidungen bleiben uns lange oder oft auch komplett verborgen.

Schließlich ist der Umgang mit unseren persönlichen Daten natürlich auch von den Werten verschiedener Generationen geprägt. Für Digital Natives wie zum Beispiel die Mitglieder der Millennials-Nachfolger Generation Z (geboren zwischen 1995 und 2015) ist es normal, ihre Daten freiwillig anzubieten. Sie sind damit aufgewachsen und nichts anderes gewohnt. Studien belegen, dass sie deswegen ihre sozialen Profile aber eben auch entsprechend bewusster managen und mit größerer Selbstverständlichkeit zwischen ihren diversen digitalen Identitäten wandeln.

Sehnsucht nach Unsterblichkeit

Unwissenheit, kognitive Muster und verschiedene Werte verschiedener Generationen – all dies sind einleuchtende rationale Erklärungen. Die eigentliche Triebfeder für unseren Datenteilungsdrang ist dennoch eine anderere: der Wunsch, uns durch das Datenteilen mitzuteilen. Dahinter steckt die Sehnsucht, Spuren zu hinterlassen, eine digitale Geschichte unseres Lebens, die uns überdauert und unsere persönlichen Daten unter Umständen sogar zu einem größeren algorithmischen Netz zusammenwebt. Im Grunde geht es dabei um den Evergreen unter den menschlichen Grundbedürfnissen: unseren Wunsch nach Unsterblichkeit.

Ob Quantified-Self-Apps, die unser Verhalten quantifizieren, um es zu optimieren, Life-Logging (also die kontinuierliche digitale Aufzeichnung des eigenen Lebens), oder ein Service wie Ghost Writer, der „algorithmische Autobiographien“ erstellt: Das freiwillige Teilen unserer persönlichen Daten entspringt unserer Sehnsucht danach, einen Feedback-Beweis zu haben für die eigene Existenz. Daten sind unsere Lebenszeichen. Data ergo sum.

Wir ahnen, dass wir wohl keine Wahl haben. Natürlich könnten wir uns entscheiden, ein völlig analoges Leben zu führen und uns der digitalen Gesellschaft zu entziehen. Dies kann allerdings in der sozialen Isolation enden und auch Karrierechancen mindern. Unsere Identitäten sind nunmal inzwischen zu einem Großteil digital.

„Digiphrenie“ in der Grauzone

Unser Datenmitteilungsdrang ist ein unersättliches Monster, das keine moderaten Haltungen zulässt. Entweder wir koppeln uns komplett ab vom digitalen Datenstrom oder wir springen voll hinein. Denn teilen wir erst einmal Daten, dann wollen wir auch ein möglichst komplettes Selbst projezieren, und je mehr Daten wir teilen, desto vollständiger wird dieses öffentliche Bild von uns. Zum einen atomisieren soziale Medien unsere Identität – der Autor Douglas Rushkoff nennt das „Digiphrenie“. Zum anderen sind sie eben genau die Kanäle, um die Einheit, unsere Identität, wiederherzustellen: indem wir noch mehr teilen. Wenn schon „Matrix,“ dann bitte voll und ganz mit uns!

Allerdings sind wir nun vernetzter und kommunikativer als je zuvor, und doch einsamer und sozial isolierter. Vielen von uns fehlt echte menschliche Bindung, und Experten beklagen eine Krise der Freundschaft in unseren westlichen Gesellschaften. Die Rückzugsräume für Intimität werden knapper, und Privatsphäre gilt zwar als heilig, ist aber vor allem ein rechtliches Konstrukt, das sich in der digitalen Realität kaum noch durchsetzen lässt. Ganz anders war die Wahrnehmung im alten Athen. Dort galt Privatheit als unsozial: Die Teilnahme an der Polis, am öffentlichen Leben, qualifizierte einen als Bürger.

Das Problem scheint heutzutage darin zu bestehen, dass wir weder richtig öffentlich, noch jemals mehr richtig privat sind. Stattdessen weilen wir in einer Grauzone, in der wir uns entweder in Pseudo-Öffentlichkeiten exponieren, ohne tatsächlich aktiv am gesellschaftlichen Diskurs teilzunehmen. Auf der anderen Seite können wir uns eben auch nie ganz von den digitalen Foren lossagen. Alleinsein ist gesellschaftlich, praktisch und moralisch unmöglich.

Es bleibt festzuhalten:

  • Die Angst, unsere Identität zu schwächen, ist größer als die Angst vor der digitalen Ausbeutung.
  • Die Sehnsucht nach Anerkennung ist stärker als das Bedürfnis nach Privatheit.
  • Die Sehnsucht nach einer Datenbiografie, einem digitalen Vermächtnis, das uns überdauert, ist größer als der Wunsch unser Leben kontrollieren zu können.

Die Zukunft gehört exponentiellen Identitäten

Diese Dynamiken werden durch das Internet of Things noch einmal exponentiell zunehmen. Schon bald soll es mehr zwischenmaschinelle als zwischenmenschliche Kommunikation geben. 20 Milliarden Geräte werden bis 2020 mit dem Internet verbunden sein, sagt Analystenfirma Gartner.

Somit wird das Internet of Things zwangsläufig auch zum Internet of People. Dinge werden zu Käufern, Kunden und Personen werden, Daten produzieren und eigene Identitäten annehmen. Umgekehrt mutieren wir selber immer mehr zu Dingen, objektiviert und auf Datensätze reduziert. Wer glaubt, dass unsere digitalen Aktivitäten heute schon einen Großteil unserer Identität ausmachen, well, you ain‘t seen nothing yet.

All dies bedeutet, dass wir uns von einer Knowledge- zu einer Identity-Economy bewegen, in der eine Vielzahl an parallelen Identitäten kultiviert, expandiert, gemanagt und gehandelt werden. Digitale Plattformen, die Zugriff auf hunderte Millionen solcher Identitäten haben und als deren Marktplätze fungieren, werden weiterhin zu den Gewinnern zählen, aber auch Anbieter von spezialisierten Identity-Management-Lösungen.

„Mehr als eine Identität zu haben ist ein Zeichen mangelnder Integrität“ – so hat das Mark Zuckerberg einmal formuliert. Gegen diese Haltung gilt es anzukämpfen. Unsere digiten Menschenrechte fußen auf einem zentralen Prinzip: mehr als nur ein Datensatz zu sein. Ob es unser Facebook-Graph ist oder unser Profil bei anderen digitalen Plattformen, wir dürfen es nie zulassen, auf nur eine Identität reduziert werden. Wir müssen den Raum und die Mittel haben, um unsere digitalen Identitäten selber ständig erweitern und kontrollieren zu können.

Dabei helfen offene Plattformen wie Respect Network, Citizenme, Mydex oder Jolocom, die Qiy Foundation, die es Nutzern ermöglicht, ihre Datenpakete an den meistbietenden zu verkaufen, oder natürlich auch die Bitcoin-Technologie Blockchain, die verspricht den Mittelsmann ganz auszuschalten und Datenaustausch Peer-to-Peer zu regeln.

Fest steht: Wir werden auch in Zukunft weiter freiwillig und fleißig unsere Daten teilen, um uns unsterblich machen zu wollen. Aber ohne die Freiheit, mehrere, unter Umständen auch widersprüchliche Identitäten zu unterhalten und verschiedene digitale Leben zu führen, werden wir uns immer weniger lebendig fühlen.

Mehr zum Thema: 


          'Vice News Tonight' Seeks To Reinvent TV News For Millennials   
Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit KELLY MCEVERS, HOST: The show "Vice News Tonight" aired its one 100th episode last night on HBO. The show mixes the edgy style of the Vice Media Company with the familiar format of the "Nightly News." NPR's David Folkenflik went to Brooklyn to meet Vice executives and learn more about how their experiment is going. DAVID FOLKENFLIK, BYLINE: Vice CEO Shane Smith created a media empire out of a magazine he co-founded more than two decades ago in Canada. It was roguish, rough, macho and young. That last one was becoming a concern. SHANE SMITH: Frankly, we're aging with our demo. So when Vice magazine started, we were a Gen-X company. When we started putting video online as an experiment, everything changed. FOLKENFLIK: Video made Vice young again. SMITH: When we started news, it was a given that millennials didn't give a [expletive] about news. And they sure as hell didn't care about international news, right? So we started doing short-form. It had
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          Talent Management in SCM Function   

I interviewed Sanjay Desai who discussed Talent Management in SCM Function.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Thanks, Dustin. I appreciate this particular lead and the time that you're investing in me for this phone call. Let me introduce myself. I'm Sanjay Desai. I'm an end-to-end supply chain professional based in Singapore since 1998. I started my career as a blue-collar worker during 1983 for Unilever in India in the warehousing function. I used to do loading/unloading, pick /pack operation, and also drive a 3-ton vehicle to make deliveries to customers day in and day out.

 

I was in the last year of my grad studies, and I came from family background where making money was necessary. After competing my Graduation, I was offered a job as a clerk in the same warehouse, and that is where actually my progress started.

 

I worked in a few positions during my six years at Unilever and continued taking additional responsibility which kept me moving upwards in the food chain. I moved to AVENTIS in 1990 and then to RPG Group company called CEAT Tyres for a short stint. Exxon India pulled me from CEAT Tyres in 1996-97.  The Exxon move was cornerstone of my future, and it kind of exposed me to a regional platform in Singapore.

 

Exxon India [00:01:14] to advancing upward during 1998 and with my desire to take more functions, more work, I moved to Apple in 1999 followed by Dell Global and then to S. C. Johnson till 2010. In 2010, I got my first break into the leadership at Thermo Fisher Scientific, a medical devices company, as director of supply chain for Asia Pac. I left Thermo Fisher after five solid years. Then I joined HUNTSMAN as director of supply chain for Greater IPAC, which eventually I left in 2016, end last year. After working for 34 years and nine different geographies and many other functions in supply chain, I decided to work for myself. And from January 2017, I truly am a freelancer helping SMEs and homegrown companies in Asia to increase their appetite and passion in supply chain. I do a little bit of training as white paper writing and training in S&OP and other stuff

 

I'm indebted to God, my family, friends, and my network of professionals for the sustained journey of growth. Very proud of what I do, Dustin..

 

Can you talk about whether there is a talent gap and what you see in this as far as talent in supply chain?

 

The talent gap is there, definitely. But it is not so much exonerated as the talent gap that people typically tend to use. And I think professionals at higher or mid-management levels tend to overplay this word “skillset Gap”  there is a gap, definitely. And the gap has happened because of a couple of factors, and we will take a look during out call. But there is indeed a gap, but it's just overplayed a bit. The gap is not as wide as people made it out to look like that.

 

What are executives doing about this?

 

One of the things that we don't really do, we don't think longevity, and we don't think sustainability. And what I mean is that there may be a gap, at the same time, there's a gap in not able to identify, nurture and grow talent. So it works both ways. There is a gap, and then we are not doing it right now today, something for the talent to grow, nurture, retain and hire so that the gap does not widen. After a couple of years, this talent is available to take on additional responsibility and take management positions. But because we are not in that league because of the fast pace today, we are really not able to do talent management well. And that is creating a gap because we are not doing something today for the future.

 

Can you talk about what are the technology disruptions that will be in the supply chain world and related to talent management?

 

So if we look at the technology for the next five years, there are very broad mega-structures that we see. We have ecommerce coming in. We have direct delivery to customers by way of drone. We have 3D printing going to have a massive effect on manufacturing. And mostly, the manufacturing jobs are going to be in terms of some difficulty because when a robot can replace three to four humans very easily.

 

So having said that, the gap is going to widen further because the current set of people, especially in the manufacturing side, in the OMNI Channel inventory, those skillset are going to be less and less in demand. And a new skillset is going to win demand which can work with technology, which can work with 3D printing, and which will work with Additive manufacturing.

 

So there is going to be a transformation in the skillset of the existing skillset slowly waning out. But a new set of skillset would come in. And the recent “Z”  generation that we see is exactly kind of in the right position to take on those roles eventually because of their capability and “ease of Use’ with technology from a mindset perspective as well as from a change management perspective. So these are now the major trends that we see in supply chain,

 

So if you look at the next 10 years and the kind of ecommerce that is going to happen, the change in the mode of delivery to customers and if you look at healthcare sector as a DIRECT Delivery, if you look at oil and gas sector with the oil prices falling down, there are different composition of chemicals coming up. The end user markets are going to grow. In Asia and India and China, especially where we have a layered distribution structure, that structure slowly will go away.

 

There is a very definitive transformation and transition happening in supply chain. So we need people who are comfortable with technology. We need people with skillsets who are comfortable to work on ecommerce and high-change management teams which don't stand kind of longer term, short product life cycles. And more business happening on the ecommerce frame. So those are some of the broad skillset changes that you will see in supply chain.

 

The recent, resources that we have, which is the Millennials and the people who are in their mid-40s and 50s, we need to change things around otherwise I am thinking in the next five years. Even my job is going to go away when somebody else can he be...a younger generation can easily take over my job and ensure the same efficiency.

 

Thanks Sanjay for sharing today. Did we cover all the points you wanted to make?

 

Yes, most of it. Definitely with it. Because we talk about talent, management, grow, nourisher and I will doing enough in order to skillset for the future so we have definitely cover in our span as much wider it is in a talent management, Dustin.

 

Great I look forward to interview you in the future in a additional topic.

 

Thank you so much Dustin, you have a great day ahead. Take care.

 

 


About Sanjay Desai

 

 

 

 

Sanjay Desai

 

Strategic SCM Transformation, Manufacturing Planning, Inventory Mgmt, Network optimization, Service Segmentation & P&L

 

LinkedIn Profile


          Edith Russell: Associate Editor   
From the Millennial Star, July 1945 — A Woman’s Point of View By Edith Russell Is This the Answer? It appears to be comparatively easy for an allied soldier to resist overtures of friendliness made by a German soldier, but he finds it the most difficult thing in the world to resist those made by […]
          The unexpected reasons 90% of wealthy parents don't tell their kids what they'll inherit   


By CNBC, June 26, 2017

Parents and children usually find it awkward to discuss money, especially when it comes to talking about the overlap of wealth and death. That's why 68 percent of millennials expect an inheritance, yet only 40 percent of parents will probably leave them one. But, it turns out, wealthy families may be even more uncomfortable talking about money than other families.

Only 10 percent of rich parents, the Washington Post reports, give their children a full picture of what they stand to inherit.


Read More: http://www.cnbc.com

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          What Is HBO’s Next Breakout Comedy Hit?   

HBO has two of TV’s great comedies with “Veep” and “Silicon Valley.” But does it have another to join their ranks?

HBO’s biggest ratings success is Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson’s “Ballers,” which averaged 7.1 million viewers last season. Audiences (including Sen. Elizabeth Warren) clearly love it — but it hasn’t earned the Emmy buzz of shows like “Silicon Valley” (which averaged 4.74 million this past season), “Girls” (4.17 million) or “Veep” (3.64).

“Girls” has bowed out after six seasons, leaving shows like Aziz Ansari’s “Master of None” on Netflix and Donald Glover’s “Atlanta” on FX to snag some of its millennial fans. Both, like “Girls,” are strong Emmy contenders.

HBO could use a brightly burning new prospect, given that “Veep,” coming off its widely acclaimed Season 6, is no longer the new kid on the block, and “Silicon Valley” will be without co-star T.J. Miller when it returns for its fifth season. Its recent half-hour additions include the Sarah Jessica Parker vehicle “Divorce” (which averaged 4.41 million viewers), Issa Rae’s “Insecure” (3.6 million) and Pete Holmes’ “Crashing” (2.61 million).

“They’re definitely at a transition moment in that ‘Girls’ just left,” Jason Mittell, professor of film and media culture at Middlebury College, told TheWrap. “‘Silicon Valley’ is solid but not a huge hit — and maybe there’s a little bit more risk losing a main cast member. ‘Veep’ is long-running at this point — obviously, I think it’s seen as creatively very strong — but it’s not the new generation.”

Saul Austerlitz, pop culture writer and author of the book “Sitcom,” told TheWrap that HBO is making promising moves in the genre: “I would say they’ve introduced a bunch of new shows in the last year or two — at least some of them have peaked my interest personally and have a lot of potential for the future.”

Asterlitz praises “Vice Principals,” the Danny McBride comedy that launched in July 2016 and returns later this year for its second and supposedly final season. Asterlitz calls the ribald series “absolutely terrific and just extremely well done, and a show that’s very much of the moment. So that felt to me like it was flying a little bit under the radar.”

Mittell said that both “Insecure” and “High Maintenance” are “really interesting shows,” although he added that neither is “hugely successful.” He also appreciates that both were developed by the network from web series: “It shows another line of development.”

“Insecure” returns for its second season on July 23, the same night that Dwayne Johnson’s “Ballers” begins its third season. Both arrive a week after the drama “Game of Thrones,” HBO’s marquee show.

“‘Game of Thrones’ still casts the biggest shadow, and ‘Westworld’ was fairly successful — but I don’t know if it will be able to sustain — and ‘Leftovers’ has finished up,” said Mittell, co-author of the book “How to Watch Television.” “So there aren’t a lot of programs on HBO right now besides ‘Game of Thrones’ that you can say, ‘This is the brand for the network.'”

He continued, “Every channel, every network needs to get a new hit every few years, and right now, I don’t think HBO has a comedy hit in the works. I don’t think that they are in a rocky place, but I don’t think that they are in a highly developed and confident place with their comedies.”

Bill Mesce, author of “Inside the Rise of HBO,” is confident that HBO is doing what it takes to adjust and evolve.

“‘Girls’ was a signature, only-on-HBO kind of show, but it was not a huge ratings pillar for the service,” Mesce told TheWrap. “If HBO has proven anything in its 55 years, it’s its resiliency. They’ll be fine.”

HBO declined to comment on this story.

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          7 401(k) Mistakes All Millennials Should Avoid   

Ah, retirement. More time to travel and spend time with loved ones. Sounds great - assuming you can afford it! While it might be decades away, you need to start planning for it now. But you already knew that, right? Still, once a year when your 401(k) rep stops by the office for a presentation, you may find yourself zoning out as they go on about "target-date funds." Hopefully, despite the dry nature of retirement planning, you've decided to set up a 401(k) anyway. That's a great first step! But now you should understand the common pitfalls and how to avoid them. Here are seven.

Mistake 1: Prioritize It Over All Other Financial Goals

Author and financial expert Nicole Lapin says contrary to what you've heard, maxing out a 401(k) isn't for everyone. She cites a few scenarios where you shouldn't prioritize it, like if you don't have a personal savings account that covers six to nine months of bills and expenses. "You need to have liquid, readily available cash to cover expenses if you lose your job or are in a pinch," Lapin says, suggesting young people contribute to their "rainy day" fund before a 401(k). Another case when you shouldn't rush to max out your 401(k): if you have a lot of debt. "If you have a substantial amount of debt, especially with crummy interest rates, then you're better off chiseling away at it early than investing it in the market."

Mistake 2: Fail to Sign Up For Automatic Escalation

You have the option to automatically increase your contributions to your 401(k) as you make more money - and it would be a mistake not to take advantage of it. "You're less likely to spend that money on something else if it never hits your checking account," Lapin says, "and more likely to put it to good use if the ramp up is on auto-drive." If you can't max out the $18,000 allowed annual contribution today, consider opting into a 2 percent increase each year until you get there.

Mistake 3: Invest in High-Fee Plans

A study from Nerdwallet found that just a 1 percent fee could cost you almost $600,000 by the time your retire. So when you are deciding where to direct the money in your 401(k), it pays to read the fine print. Your 401(k) will likely give you a few investment options to choose from. You want to choose a fund that has the lowest "expense ratio," which is charged as an annual percentage of your total investment in the fund. Typically, passively managed index funds have lower fees than mutual funds. When you leave your company, also consider rolling over your 401(k) into an IRA, which likely has lower management fees.

Mistake 4: Leave Money on the Table

If your company offers 401(k) matching, it's a shame to not take advantage of it. Do your best to understand their program, and even set up a one-on-one meeting with HR if you need help making sense of it. Then, do what you can to meet the matching requirement. If you're company doesn't offer matching, Lapin says you should still inquire about nonmatching contributions. "A match is usually best, but even if your employer doesn't match they might still offer nonmatching contributions based on a percentage of your pay or company profits, especially if your company had a banner year. You won't know until you ask."

Mistake 5: Invest Less Than 10 percent

A typical household needs to save 15 percent of their earnings for retirement, according to a study from The Center for Retirement Research at Boston College. And you don't want to put off hitting that target until you're older and have high out-of-pocket expenses like kids in college. Starting young also gives your money more time to compound in the market. In other words, you can reinvest the money you made off your initial investment and now make earnings on your earnings. It's how the rich get richer.

If you don't believe putting a little more money into your account today will have big returns later, check out this example offered by Nick Holeman, a certified financial planner and financial planning expert at online investing service Betterment. "Someone who puts $4,000 per year into retirement accounts starting at 22 years old can have $1 million by age 62, assuming 8 percent average annual returns. Wait 10 years to start contributing and you'd have to put in more than twice as much – $8,800 per year - to reach the same goal."

Mistake 6: Assume You Can Use It Penalty-Free For a Home

Typically, you can withdraw money early from your 401(k) for a down payment if you have not been previous homeowners in the last two years. But there's a catch, according to Lapin: you can only withdraw $10,000 penalty-free. "That means that you'll be paying an additional 10 percent tax on top of your additional income tax." In other words, if you typically pay 30 percent in income taxes, you will pay 40 percent on whatever you take out for a down payment after $10,000.

Mistake 7: Misunderstand the Implications of Taking a Loan

While you shouldn't take out a loan from your 401(k) if you can avoid it, if it does happen remember that you will owe the money back once you leave your company. "That's true whether or not you're leaving voluntarily," Lapin explains. "It's time to pay up and close out. Or else that loan amount will count as income, and you'll be hit with some hefty withdrawal fees."

Now that you know these common mistakes, log on to your 401(k) account and make sure you haven't made any of them!


          Comment on Question of the Day: Are You As Operator as F*ck? by ORCON   
Millennial = any young person you don't like Hope you enjoy eating dog food when social security goes tits up. :)
          New Work Trends: Benefits of Working from Home [Infographic]   
The Millennial workforce is creating a growing trend of working from home. It is a trend that has been growing for years and isn’t showing any signs stopping. A recent study from Polycom shows that almost a full third of employees around the globe are regularly working remotely, and almost two-thirds have some sort of flexible work [...]

          El País dedica una columna a criticar a uno de sus columnistas   

Hacia allá va la barquita de El ‘PPaís’, criticando a los Millennials, insultando a representantes políticos honestos. Su tripulación, desesperada se queja cantando: “Hay quien maneja mi barca, quién, que a la deriva me lleva…”. Y así va la triste nave, que de tener 100 cañones por banda, ha pasado a ser “El Holandés Errante” de la prensa, un legendario barco fantasma que ahora surca los mares malditos del periodismo mercenario.

etiquetas: el país, prisa, cebrián, joaquín reyes

» noticia original (www.digitalsevilla.com)


          Millennials hebben de verkeerde opvoeding gekregen   
(Door: Esther van Fenema) Wie zijn kinderen liefheeft, leert ze om te gaan met frustratie De kleinkinderen van de babyboomers mogen zich inmiddels volwassen noemen. Ik zie ze overal om me heen, als patiënten en studenten, waarbij hun lage frustratiedrempel … Lees verder
          Playlist 02.07.17 : Five Songs for the Weekend   
Playlist 02.07.17 : Five Songs for the Weekend

Alex Cameron – Candy May
A while back, after having caught Australian musician Alex Cameron as an opener for Angel Olsen, I was pretty enamored of his performance, and the assuredness of its shtickyness (and yes, it is shticky). If you can appreciate Lana Del Rey for her mellifluous lists of hollowed signifiers and decoupaged images of millennial-imagined withering Americana, you might likewise find it easy to appreciate elements of Cameron’s aesthetic (though perhaps there’s some withering Austral..iana there, too).

The article Playlist 02.07.17 : Five Songs for the Weekend first appeared on This Is Glamorous.


          Millennials: The Golden Goose of the ACA   
If health insurers really need millennials’ help to build and stabilize their business, they’re going to have to prove it.
          We Sent a Millennial to a Decaying Kmart Store and Couldn't Believe the Horrors She Discovered   
none
          Business Game Changers Radio with Sarah Westall: Millennial Stress Foretelling Huge Costs to Society?   
EpisodeRecently, I had Dr. Debra Lindh, stress and mindfulness expert, come to my college classroom before finals to talk with students about stress in the workplace and in life. It seemed like a good thing to do as finals were approaching and students were likely dealing with increased levels of stress themselves. What I didn’t know at the time, was how much the students would positively react to the talk.   I knew that Lindh was good, but what I didn’t realize was the extent co ...
          Business Game Changers Radio with Sarah Westall: Rethink Your Strategy – From Managing Millennials to Building Passive Income   
EpisodeAs with all generations before, the business world is becoming more dependent on the next generation. However, the gulf between the generations is massive and managing the younger generation can be difficult to comprehend. Millenials have experienced vast social networks and instant communications through out their entire lives. This has formed a different mindset and paradigm from their elders. Indigo Dutton joins us to provide tips on how to work with this group. Her vast experience with t ...
          The musical, millennial life of 'Baby Driver's' Ansel Elgort   
The star of 'Baby Driver,' and budding EDM musician, opens up about how music shapes his life
          A Spiritual Profit for Western Yogis? The spiritual significance of postural yoga for religious “nones”   

Is postural yoga evolving beyond merely a fitness practice into an important component of the spiritual lives of religious “nones” in British Columbia and perhaps elsewhere in North America? This article looks at Christian and Hindu perspectives of contemporary debates over the westernization of yoga, and utilizes qualitative survey data to investigate the spiritual value that yoga is taking on for nonreligious millennials seeking to enhance the self. Societal shifts indicate a growing cultural value of discovering one’s individual authenticity through self-development efforts, and research suggests that yoga is one way that this is being pursued. Using media coverage of two controversial Canadian incidents — the cancellation of a proposed mass yoga class on Vancouver’s Burrard Street Bridge, and the cancellation of a free annual yoga class over concerns of cultural appropriation at the University of Ottawa — this article explores different perspectives of practicing postural yoga in North America. It is argued that postural yoga is evolving into a spiritually beneficial or profitable component of the lives of many religious “nones”, and that future contestations of the practice of postural yoga may require consideration of its value in the spiritual lives of a growing population who have no religion.


          Williams Sonoma Is Having a Huge Sale Right Now (Including KitchenAid!) — See What We're Buying    

Calling all cooks! Williams-Sonoma is celebrating July 4th with big savings of up to 75% on electrics, cookware, tabletop & bar, cutlery, cooks’ tools and food — plus free shipping! So whether you’re ready to upgrade that 99-cent frying pan you’ve had since college or need a gift to give the newlyweds, now’s the time to do some shopping.

Among the sizzling items we’ve got our eyes on:

KitchenAid Artisan Stand Mixer ($349.95) Yup, KitchenAid products are included in the sale so now is a better time than any to pull the trigger. This version in the of-the-moment “Millennial Pink” is especially fun for adding a pop of color to you kitchen.

Monogrammed Williams Sonoma BBQ Tools Set ($92) Summer is here and this set has all you need to become a master behind the grill. Plus, you can customize it for your favorite cook (or yourself!)!

Vitamix 780 Blender ($599.95) Chill out this summer with a smoothie or margarita whipped up in this high-powered kitchen essential.

Check out the other items on sale at williams-sonoma.com.



          The Trends Of Gen Z: How This Company Is Using Digital Storytelling To Reach The Next Generation   
Artificial intelligence and virtual reality have grown in popularity among millennials and Gen Zers. Are immersive technologies the future of communication for younger generations? This company is betting on it.
              
Who do you side with? Start a debate below, Republicans vs Democrats. Results come out in one day. Comment Below! . . Follow Our Partners: 🔴@republican_conservative_news 🔵@conservative__daily 🔴@trump.45_ 🔵@eagle.flight45 🔴@the.crying.liberal 🔵@millennial_patriots 🔴@proud_trumplican 🔵@woman4merica
          Brooke Shields : Ses filles interdites de mannequinat   
Brooke Shields : Ses filles interdites de mannequinat

Brooke Shields : Ses filles interdites de mannequinat

Kaia Gerber (15 ans), Thylane Blondeau (16 ans), Lily-Rose Depp (18 ans), Paris Jackson (19 ans)... les Millennials ont conquis l'industrie de la mode ! La folle ascension de cette nouvelle vague aurait pu profiter aux soeurs Rowan et Grier Henchy. Mais leur mère, l'actrice et top model Brooke...

Publié le 2 juillet 2017 par CDPADMIN


          Millennials: the global guardians of capital   
On the programme this week we discuss a new UBS white paper, ‘Millennials: the global guardians of capital. At the intersection of tech and wealth’. Join our special guests, including one of the report’s co-authors, to hear what sets the Millennials apart, chart the extraordinary wealth transfer that is to define them in the coming years, challenge some preconceptions about Millennials’ values and priorities, and attempt to better understand the opportunities available to all stakeholders who respond positively to these trends.
          Harry Potter and the Millennial Money Grab: 3 Numbers Reveal the Real Magic of the Series   

Click to view a price quote on SCHL.

Click to research the Media industry.

          The musical, millennial life of 'Baby Driver's' Ansel Elgort   
The star of 'Baby Driver,' and budding EDM musician, opens up about how music shapes his life
          The musical, millennial life of 'Baby Driver's' Ansel Elgort   
The star of 'Baby Driver,' and budding EDM musician, opens up about how music shapes his life
          5 Ways to Inspire Millennials at Work   

 

Business leaders, entrepreneurs and other professionals often bemoan the apparent lack of commitment, loyalty and ambition present in Generation Y employees. Those 80s and 90s babies buck workplace convention. They talk back. They want to dress differently, are bored easily and come across as wanting life handed to them on a platter. Why is it that Millennials seem to want to frustrate us by constantly asking ‘Why?’

Isn’t this much the same way each new generation has been perceived by the one before it? How many lectures did you hear during childhood about how much ‘easier’ things are now? Didn’t your grandparents go on similar rants with your parents? Could it be that Millennials are unwittingly challenging us to …


          The musical, millennial life of 'Baby Driver's' Ansel Elgort   
The star of 'Baby Driver,' and budding EDM musician, opens up about how music shapes his life
          Heaven Scent with Maureen St. Germain: The Sexual Revolution in the Millennial Generation   
Guest
          APARTHEID IS NOT AN ANGLOSPHERIC VALUE:   
Study: Israel Losing Support Among Democrats, Minorities, Millennials (Ben Sales, July 2, 2017, JTA) 

[W]hat do you think of when you think of Israel? If you're like most Americans, you picture walls of concrete enclosing an austere and strict country. The men wear black hats, the women long skirts. Everyone looks pretty serious.

That's what Brand Israel Group, a group of former advertising professionals who set out to sell Israel to Americans, found in a series of focus groups beginning in 2005. The group has since commissioned two surveys of the American public -- in 2010 and 2016 -- and didn't like what it found.

According to the surveys, Israel has pretty broad backing among American citizens, but is losing support among a range of growing demographics. As pro-Israel advocates tout "shared values" between the United States and Israel, fewer and fewer Americans actually think they believe the same things as Israelis.

"Shared values are the bedrock of our relationship, and young Americans do not believe Israel shares our values," said Fern Oppenheim, one of the group's co-founders.


          The musical, millennial life of 'Baby Driver's' Ansel Elgort   
The star of 'Baby Driver,' and budding EDM musician, opens up about how music shapes his life
          The Surprising Positive Power of Walking   
Communities who walk reap economic opportunities, environmental improvements, and health benefits.

Many things leap to mind when someone mentions walking: fitness, fun, fresh air, relaxation, friends and maybe your most comfortable pair of shoes.  But a word that rarely arises is “power”.

That will begin to change after the 2017 National Walking Summit (held in St. Paul, Minnesota September 13-15), which is themed “Vital and Vibrant Communities—The Power of Walkability”.

Like earlier summits, this event brings together people of all backgrounds to strategize ways of making sure the advantages of walking can be shared by all, no matter what their income or where they live.

Walking advocates once focused primarily on physical health —spurred by mounting evidence that physical activity is key to preventing disease—but now are stepping up to promote social, economic and community health. Their ultimate goal is to transform towns and neighborhoods across America into better places for everyone to live.

 “The power of walking is becoming more clear all the time,” declares Kate Kraft, executive director of America Walks. “Community connections, social equity, a sense of well-being, business opportunities, affordable housing, more choices for kids and older people, a cleaner environment—these are some of the benefits of walkable places.”

Walking Boosts Health & Happiness

Streams of medical studies now document the central role physical activity plays in fending off disease and disability. Chances of depression, dementia, colon cancer, heart disease, anxiety, diabetes and other conditions drop by at least 40 percent among people engaging in moderate exercise such as walking. 

landmark study issued last year found that sedentary habits are a bigger health threat than high blood pressure or cholesterol— about the only thing more dangerous than inactivity is smoking reported the New York Times.  This followed on the heels of a Cambridge University study showing that a lack of exercise increased your risk of death twice as much as obesity. 

All the scientific data persuaded former Surgeon General Vivek H. Murthy to issue a landmark Call to Action to Promote Walking and Walkable Communities in 2015, which has been compared to the 1964 Surgeon General’s report on the dangers of smoking. “Walking helps people stay both physically and mentally healthy,” Murthy wrote, calling on us “to increase walking by working together to increase access to safe and convenient places to walk.” 

Walking stands out among all other exercise because: 1) It is free; 2) It requires no special training or equipment; 3) It can be done almost anywhere at any time; and 4) It is already Americans’ #1 favorite physical activity.  The US Department Transportation reports that Americans reported walking 14 percent more in 2012 than in 2002 (latest figures available).

Walking Advances Social Justice

“The health benefits of walking are so overwhelming that to deny access to that is a violation of fundamental human rights,” declared sociologist Robert A. Bullard, founder of the environmental justice movement, at the 2015 Walking Summit. “All communities should have a right to a safe, sustainable, healthy, just, walkable community.”

Unfortunately, that’s not the case across America today. People walking in lower-income neighborhoods are twice as likely to be killed by traffic than those in more affluent areas. African-Americans on foot are 60 percent more likely to be killed by cars than whites, while Latinos are 43 percent more likely.

“If you have walkable communities, kids will do better in school…seniors will be healthier,” said Ron Simms—a neighborhood activist from the African-American community of Seattle who later became Deputy US Secretary of Housing and Urban Development, at the 2015 Summit. 

Better walking conditions also help low-income families economically.  Surprising new research from the George Washington School of Business shows “the most walkable urban metros are also the most socially equitable. The reason for this is that low transportation costs and better access to employment offset the higher costs of housing.”

This is backed up with Federal Highway Administration data finding that families living in auto dependent communities spent 57 percent of their income on housing and transportation, compared to 41 percent in walkable communities.

This refutes widespread rumors that making a street safe for walking is a luxury important only to well-off people. Actually, low-income residents benefit the most because they travel by foot the most, especially kids.  “The fact is that we have twice as many low-income children [nationally] who are walking or biking to school than those in affluent neighborhoods, even lacking the infrastructure to protect the children,” reports Keith Benjamin, Transportation Director in Charleston, South Carolina.  

“A big thing we could do to help low-income families is to make it easier to live without a car,” says community consultant Gil Peñalosa.  “And it would help middle-class families to switch from two cars to one.” The American Automobile Association calculates the annual pricetag of owning one car at  $8,500 a year—which goes a long way toward easing household budgets.

Safe, convenient and comfortable places to walk are fundamental to the forgotten one-third of Americans who don’t drive— the young, the old, the disabled and those too poor to buy a car. These people live under a form of house arrest in many US communities, unable to do much of anything—buy groceries, see friends, go the doctor, engage in favorite activities—without begging someone to chauffeur them. Communities from San Francisco to Birmingham to rural Iowa are pulling together to eliminate the roadblocks that deter people of all ages, incomes and racial backgrounds from walking.

 Walking Expands Economic Opportunities

People on the street mean business—literally.  Neighborhood and downtown business districts thrive on foot traffic.  West Palm Beach, Florida discovered this after making a major avenue more comfortable for pedestrians, and attracting $300 million in new business investment.  Albert Lea, Minnesota—a blue-collar rural town of 18,000—found the same thing when a walk-friendly makeover of its Main Street drew 15 new businesses in two years, with $2-5 million more in investment planned.

Even companies not dependent on local customers are eager to locate in walkable districts—especially firms in the booming tech and creative fields, who realize the young talent they depend on to stay competitive want to work within walking distance of cafes, parks and cultural attractions.  “We moved from the suburbs to downtown Minneapolis to allow our employees to take advantage of the area’s many trails and to put the office in a more convenient location for commuting by pedal or foot,” explained Christine Fruechte, CEO of large advertising firm Colle + McVoy, in a newspaper op-ed. “Our employees are healthier, happier and more productive. We are attracting some of the best talents in the industry.”

Many other companies find that walkable locations pay off in lower health insurance premiums. Thomas Schmid of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention points to Volkswagen, which built a manufacturing plant in Chattanooga only after local officials agreed to extend a popular walking-biking trail to their door.

Walking Connects People & Strengthens Communities

Eighty five percent of Americans express the desire to live somewhere walkable, making it the #1 quality they want in  a home, according to  the National Association of Realtors’ Community & Transportation Preference Survey. This is even more true for Millennials, millions of whom will be looking to buy their first home over the next few years. 

 “What makes people walk is [also] what makes great places to live,” emphasizes Harriet Tregoning, until recently a director in the Office of Community Planning at the US Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD). “Walkability is the secret sauce that improves the performance of many other things” in our communities.

Former Surgeon General Regina Benjamin emphasizes that taking a stroll “is good for the social fabric of our communities”—creating new opportunities to connect with friends and neighbors, which is not only good for your soul but also your health. That’s why Benjamin added a walking path to the grounds of the health clinic she founded in rural Alabama.

Walking Protects Our Environment

Walking more is an important step you can take to avert climate disruption, air pollution, urban sprawl and other environmental threats. More than half the suggestions in 50 Steps Toward Carbon-Free Transportation, released last year by the Frontier Group research organization, involve walking.

Walking in the Heartland

Drawing a crowd ranging from block club organizers and grassroots advocates to elected officials and medical experts, the 2017 Walking Summit features two-and-half days of workshops, major addresses, trainings, break-out discussions, success stories and on-the-ground exploration of solutions in Minnesota communities.

Among the more than seventy sessions are:  How to Build Safe Walking Networks; Walking in Rural Communities; Creating Walkable Communities Without Displacement; You Are Where You Live and Creative Walkable Interventions.

Keynote speaker Tamika Butler—director of the Los Angeles County Bicycle Coalition—will showcase how her organization broadened their mission from sustainable transportation to social justice. “We must talk about public health, gentrification, people of color, women who feel harassed on the streets, older people, black men who fear for their lives on the street, immigrants who fear deportation,” Butler says.  “Walking for many people has everything to do with living full lives and being able to get around.”

St. Paul Mayor Chris Coleman—who launched a first-of-its-kind $42 million Vitality Fund to promote walking and other community improvements—will also speak at the conference along with racial and social justice leader Glen Harris from the Center for Social Inclusion and George Halvorson of theInstitute for InterGroup Understanding, who made strides in launching walking movement as CEO of the  Kaiser Permanente health care system.  

Participants will find specific information and inspiration to take back home by following one or more of the Summit’s six “paths” of subject matter:

Healthy Communities: People’s zip codes are as accurate as their genetic code in predicting a healthy life. That’s why it’s essential to put in place policies, programs and resources to ensure everyone has an equal chance for a healthy life.

Safe, Well-Designed Communities: Too many communities are designed for the ease of motorists with little thought of people who get around other ways. The focus here is practical approaches to provide safe, convenient transportation and affordable housing for all.

Artistic and Innovative Communities:  Creativity flourishes in places where people regularly connect face-to-face on sidewalks and in public spaces.  Discover ideas about fostering foot-friendly settings that spark community engagement, cultural diversity and imaginative energy.

Productive and Thriving Communities: Walkability is closely linked with socially and economically successful places. Here’s where to start in creating vibrant neighborhoods, equitable development, affordable housing and strong downtowns or Main Streets.

Open and Collaborative Communities: Wide-ranging collaboration explains the difference between towns, suburbs or cities that blossom and those that wither. What’s the key in getting people together for authentic conversations and effective partnerships?

Engaged and Informed Communities: Access to information and decisionmakers are two powerful tools for transforming a community. These sessions offer a detailed look at new methods to gather data, engage communities, mobilize citizens and influence local government and businesses to catalyze walking. 

This is the first Walking Summit held outside Washington, DC.  “We’re really excited to showcase some of the success we’re seeing, but also share the challenges we have in Minnesota,” says Jill Chamberlain, chair of the local host committee and a senior program manager in the Center for Prevention at Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Minnesota, a featured sponsor of the event.

The Twin Cities metropolitan area in many ways represents a microcosm of America when it comes to walking. Minneapolis and St. Paul both rank relatively high for the rate of pedestrian trips among US cities, but until recently autos were the centerpiece of all urban planning in the region. Many suburbs lack sidewalks and other basic infrastructure for pedestrians. Concentrated populations of low-income households and/or people of color are found in both suburbs and cities. But there is a growing awareness that walking is important to future prosperity and quality-of-life—and growing numbers of projects to get people back on their feet.

Mobile workshops on the first day of the conference will fan out across the  area to investigate local initiatives that illustrate the power of walking— from  a police department campaign for pedestrian safety to a residential neighborhood with a small town feel to an inner city community torn apart by a freeway, which is exploring plans to reconnect itself by building a land bridge over the road.

 

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          PERÚ: Susalud impuso medidas de seguridad a siete centros de cirugía estética - EntornoInteligente   

EntornoInteligente

PERÚ: Susalud impuso medidas de seguridad a siete centros de cirugía estética
EntornoInteligente
Lima, jul. 2. En lo que va del año, la Superintendencia Nacional de Salud (SUSALUD) realizó 15 supervisiones inopinadas a clínicas y centros estéticos en varias regiones del país, e impuso siete medidas de seguridad a algunos de esos establecimientos ...
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los 6 artículos informativos »

          The musical, millennial life of 'Baby Driver's' Ansel Elgort   
The star of 'Baby Driver,' and budding EDM musician, opens up about how music shapes his life
          The musical, millennial life of 'Baby Driver's' Ansel Elgort   
The star of 'Baby Driver,' and budding EDM musician, opens up about how music shapes his life
          There's no point trying to convince millennials to garden, Monty Don says    
Reported by Telegraph.co.uk 8 minutes ago.
          Por fin un estilismo de Gigi Hadid apto para todos, que ahora podremos copiar en rebajas    

gigi hadid look

Gigi Hadid nos sorprende con nuevos estilismos cada día. Pero normalmente son bastante complicados y arriesgados, solo aptos para las más lanzadas. Sin embargo, hoy nos ha deleitado con un look que podría lucir cualquiera de nosotros con prendas básicas, atemporales y fáciles de conseguir en las tiendas low cost (y rebajadas). ¿Te apuntas con un outfit made in Gigi?

gigi hadid look

Solo han pasado un par de días desde que flipáramos con el look Barbie millennial de Gigi Hadid, con biker metalizada incluida. Muy molón de ver, pero complicado de utilizar en nuestro día a día. Más que nada porque ¿cuántas ocasiones tienes para llevar una chaqueta de cuero fucsia brillante a la oficina en julio? Pocas, la verdad. Y lo mismo nos ocurre con los chándales de terciopelo o los looks en pijama de la modelo. Por eso, lo de hoy es todo un soplo de aire fresco.

gigi hadid look

gigi hadid look

Gigi Hadid ha cogido los famosos mon jeans y les ha dado una vuelta de tuerca de cara al verano, con diseño acampanado para darle un aire más vintage. Estos jeans los ha combinado con una camiseta crop en negro y unos botines muy cañeros. El toque de color lo da el bolso bandolera de Stalvey en estampado de piel de cocodrilo rojo muy llamativo y desenfadado. Por supuesto, no pueden faltar las gafas Raen de estilo retro. ¿Te ves paseando este verano con un look inspirado en Gigi? Aquí te dejamos opciones para hacerlo.

gigi hadid look

Fotos | Gtres, Zara, Pull&Bear, Massimo Dutti.

En Trendencias | El total look en azul cielo que nos recuerda que Gigi Hadid es un auténtico ángel.

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La noticia Por fin un estilismo de Gigi Hadid apto para todos, que ahora podremos copiar en rebajas fue publicada originalmente en Trendencias por Pepa López .


           Study: Israel Losing Support Among Democrats, Minorities, Millennials    
A majority of all subgroups still supports Israel, but the numbers are falling precipitously.
          The musical, millennial life of 'Baby Driver's' Ansel Elgort   
The star of 'Baby Driver,' and budding EDM musician, opens up about how music shapes his life
          Weekend Link Love – Edition 458   

RESEARCH OF THE WEEK

More research shows that chocolate is good for cognition.

A skull cult at Gobekli Tepe. Why can’t I join a skull cult?

Now this is a depression treatment I love: bouldering.

Identical workouts have different effects on mood depending on whether you’re indoors or outdoors. I’ll let you guess which setting gives the best results.

Scientists just ran seven different replication studies of the original power pose research. All of them failed to replicate.

Millennials are having more strokes than is normal for their age. C’mon, guys.

Risk-taking may breed happiness.

Our ability to withstand extreme endurance efforts arrived alongside our large brains.

Family men and women are more productive workers.

NEW PRIMAL BLUEPRINT PODCASTS

Episode 175: Cassie Parks: Host Elle Russ chats with Cassie Parks, a woman who loves helping people discover and attain their wildest dreams.

Each week, select Mark’s Daily Apple blog posts are prepared as Primal Blueprint Podcasts. Need to catch up on reading, but don’t have the time? Prefer to listen to articles while on the go? Check out the new blog post podcasts below, and subscribe to the Primal Blueprint Podcast here so you never miss an episode.

INTERESTING BLOG POSTS

Why travel may help you live longer.

The psychology of “clutch.”

MEDIA, SCHMEDIA

How LSD therapy changed Cary Grant forever.

Take that 2 o’clock nap and don’t be shy about it.

EVERYTHING ELSE

This Thai dish might give you liver cancer.

Don’t get bit.

I think she prefers her steak rare.

Genome sequencing for everyone is getting closer and closer.

More than any other food, American GIs during World War 2 craved fresh eggs.

This 91 year-old German lady can do more pullups than most of you.

This tiger isn’t on sleeping pills.

THINGS I’M UP TO AND INTERESTED IN

Announcement I’m proud to announce: MDA named one of Best Men’s Health Blogs of the Year by Healthline.

Study retraction that didn’t surprise me: The one where paleo worsened blood lipids.

Film I’m anticipating: We Love Paleo 2. Check the teaser.

Success story that really made me proud: The one from Melani, a Primal Health Coach.

Study I enjoyed: Touch from a lover is analgesic.

RECIPE CORNER

  • Now you take a leg of lamb, some cumin, a few beets, an Akkadian translator, throw it in a pot, add some beer. Baby, you got yourself a Mesopotamian stew going.
  • It’s summer, so you should be grilling chicken. Here’s how to do a whole one.

TIME CAPSULE

One year ago (Jul 2– Jul 8)

COMMENT OF THE WEEK

“Coconut oil also removes mascara very well. Put some on a tissue or cotton pad, apply to eye for a couple seconds, and wipe. Clean eyelids.”

– Good tip, Susanne. I think I’ll give it a shot.

The post Weekend Link Love – Edition 458 appeared first on Mark's Daily Apple.


          The musical, millennial life of 'Baby Driver's' Ansel Elgort   
The star of 'Baby Driver,' and budding EDM musician, opens up about how music shapes his life
          Lazy Sunday beach reads that won’t cost you a cent! Nine free Kindle eBooks ready for download!   
Today’s Sponsor: #Next Level Manners: Business Etiquette for Millennials by Rachel Isgar 4.7 stars – 20 reviews Kindle Price: 99 cents FREE with – Learn More Text-to-Speech and Lending: Enabled Don’t have a Kindle? Get yours here. Here’s the set-up: In today’s world, business etiquette is all about raising the bar on your personal brand, […]
          The musical, millennial life of 'Baby Driver's' Ansel Elgort   
… was deep into a club music period when he found himself … action-musical "Baby Driver." (Sony/TriStar)Ever since the … for the young Elgort; electronic musicians like Avicii came into … someone else’s puzzle. But music, this is my puzzle. — …
          Football Manager: How Simulations Changed the Game   
Research indicates that millennials are entrepreneurial, which shouldn’t come as a surprise looking at the popular gaming trends. Football Manager, now in its 13th incarnation, proves this. The game revolves around being the manager of a football team – in gambling with players’ abilities, players’ strengths and weaknesses, and attempting to rise through the ranks …
          Podcast for Teachers, Techpod, Vol 2 Ep 101 8/20/07 Dog Day Gems: Art, Literacy, Tech and Fingertip Knowledge with New Millennials! Abundant Resources for Summer PD: Storyboarding, PING and Link Checking Email:podcastforteachers@gmail.com   
Enjoy episode 101- we are heading on 1 week vacations and will be back with year 3 on 9/3/07. There is plenty to catch up on! In this episode...Illustration and Storyboarding to promote literacy learning, "pinging" your blog, and using technology to ferret out those dead links in school and teacher websites. This week Mark and Kathy find themselves in a productive, late august, dog day brain space - a place somewhere between hunkering down to real work and sitting on the porch spitting watermelon seeds. With one foot still firmly planted in summer vacation and the other in thoughts about the coming school year, they take one last dip in the pool, kicking up heady reflections on Ed Tech and sharing some their favorite, easiest to use, and most significant, free resources. Catch the mood while it lasts. Next stop will be a back-to-school rally of renewed energy and new (school) year's resolutions. And don't miss out on our OTTERBOX Raffle. The Companion book for Mark and Kathy's podcast: Podcasting for Teachers by Mark Gura and Dr. King is published by Information Age Publishing. PFT recommends ordering this book directly from Information Age for the best service! www.infoagepub.com. Please take the PFT survey and you will have a chance to win a handheld digital recorder! Time is running out http://www.retc.fordham.edu/pftdata/pftsurvey.asp OR at our website click SURVEY. Have YOU left your mark on the PFT Frappr map? Tune in to your favorite weekly podcast with More Ed Tech You Can Use. Check the www.podcastforteachers.org website for all resources, articles and links at http://www.podcastforteachers.org and resources Email podcastforteachers@gmail.com PFT's name and content is developed, produced and copyrighted (p) by Fordham University, King and Gura, 2006-2007. All rights reserved. Our sponsors include Fordham's master's in adult education and HRD online degree program www.fordham.edu/gse/aded, www.TransformationEducation.com, and Libsyn.com
          Podcast for Teachers, Techpod, Vol 2 Ep 80 3/26/2007,Inconvenient Truth: 3D Penguins to Global Issues, Check Out the PFT Frappers, MapleStory, Adobe, Kodak and Free Resources Email podcastforteachers@gmail.com   
Reviews of Inconvenient Truth with Mark and Kathy. This week Kathy and Mark hyperlink themselves around the evolving intellectual landscape our New Millennials are taking charge of. They visit virtual hangouts, observe real activities kids participate in there, and share resources adults can use to engage them with on this new digital turf. Convenient or inconvenient, there are new truths for educators to embrace. Feedback from listeners about Olympus recorders and their uses. This week discussions span virtual worlds in Club Penguin, parent concenrs, student brillance and opportunities. Is there a collision of worlds? Great educational resources to use with Al Gore's Inconvenient Truth and its commentary on technology use in our culture. Also free resources from Kodak and Adobe Digital Kids Club and others abound. And when you thought you knew what was happening there are flying bichons, flying penguins and much much more, all on PFT. Podcamp NYC: join Kathy and Mark, podcast listeners and podcasters for the unconference April 6-7, 2007 http://www.podcampnyc.org May 1, 2007 Deadline PFT Best Ed Podcast Contest continues until "May Day" 2007. Tune in to your favorite weekly podcast with More Ed Tech You Can Use. Check the www.podcastforteachers.org website for all resources, articles and links at http://www.podcastforteachers.org and resources Email podcastforteachers@gmail.com PFT's name and content is developed, produced and copyrighted (p) by Fordham Univ., King and Gura, 2006-2007. All rights reserved. Our sponsors include Libsyn.com, Learningtimes.net .
          Podcast for Teachers, Techpod, Vol 2 Ep 72 1/22/ AND 1/29/07 Online Etiquette, Digital Diaries, and Laptops (Gaming too) Email: podcastforteachers@gmail.com   
Online Etiquette, Digital Diaries, and Laptops (Gaming too): Kathy and Mark scour the latest EdTech news and riff, report, and rant on trends important and amusing. Devices, market trends, education innovations, and New Millennials observed as anthropological specimens all make it into the mix with PFT mascot solo included. Tune in to your favorite weekly podcast with More Ed Tech You Can Use. Hear who wins the raffle in the next episode! Greatest news the full details of the 2nd Annual PFT Best Podcasting Education Awards were discussed today! Deadline 5/1/07 winners' program or school will also receive a $100 prize and a certificate of award. Web page has details PFTbestpodcastawards.html Check the www.podcastforteachers.org website for all resources, articles and links at http://www.podcastforteachers.org/ResourcesbyPodcast.html Let us know your take on the news and resources Email podcastforteachers@gmail.com Past episodes through our website portal www.podcastforteachers.org PFT's name and content is developed, produced and copyrighted (p) by Fordham Univ., King and Gura, 2006."More Ed Tech You Can Use Today and Tomorrow from Podcast for Teachers(sm)!" All rights reserved.
          Podcast for Teachers, Techpod, Vol 2 Ep 66 12/04/06 Technology Gets Some Traction! Best Science Show from Cable? Mr Lincoln's T-Mail, Teacher Simulation Game and Questions about Info Literacy among the Millenials.   
Technology Gets Some Traction! Traction in critical thinking that is! Covering ground as science excellence comes from the MythBusters on cable tv- hear Mark talk about how he is an enduring fan of this approach. Questioning common beliefs and assumptions! And Abe Lincoln as a traditional civil war general on horseback with spies only by foot? How about 1,000 telegrams to speed messages? Thinking outside the box of 1800's military traditions. Urgency for millennials to gain more skills in information literacy- where are they coming up short? What does it mean? Stirring discussion. Gaming again- this time with a twist! Games for teachers to learn clasrrom discipline and decision making. Simulation Aha! reviewed by Dr. Kathy King. Critical thinking, reflective practice, split second adrenaline, the good news is, you get to try again! Don't miss this! Dr. Ruby Payne created this simulation game. Chances for YOU to win with PFT- Dec 10 5pm EST deadline- SPOTLIGHT Send your unique ideas of how you use ed tech with teaching and learning with your students. We want to share it with PFT listeners and teachers more. Submission form and details are at www.podcastforteachers.org/pftspotlight.html You will have a chance to win a digital voice recorder/mp3 player! Finally the greatest news the full details of the 2nd Annual PFT Best Podcasting Education Awards were discussed today! Deadline 5/1/07 winners' program or school will also receive a $100 prize and a certificate of award. Web page has details PFTbestpodcastawards.html Check the www.podcastforteachers.org website for all resources, articles and links at http://www.podcastforteachers.org/ResourcesbyPodcast.html Let us know your take on the news and resources Email podcastforteachers@gmail.com Support PFT: You can buy your own Fordham RETC MP3 player/voice recorder combo for yourself or students and colleagues- bulk pricing available too visit http://www.retc.fordham.edu and for books http://infoagepub.com. Past episodes through our website portal www.podcastforteachers.org PFT's name and content is developed, produced and copyrighted (p) by Fordham RETC, Center for Professional Development, King and Gura, 2006."More Ed Tech You Can Use Today and Tomorrow from Podcast for Teachers(sm)!"All rights reserved.
          Would I Lie to You? Annie Lennox told she has “potential” by music coordinator at online radio station   

Kevin Winter/WireImageHey, millennials: Here’s one reason to learn something about music that came out before […]

The post Would I Lie to You? Annie Lennox told she has “potential” by music coordinator at online radio station appeared first on 93.3 The Drive.


          The musical, millennial life of 'Baby Driver's' Ansel Elgort   
The star of 'Baby Driver,' and budding EDM musician, opens up about how music shapes his life
          6 Highly Operative Viral Marketing Techniques   
The millennial guys are all looking for some surprise, shock, excitement, thrill once in a while and now with the explosion of mass media and social media, a picture, video clipping, an infographic or a shocking tweet can spread like a virus across networks to people living in geographically different places and become the center point of discussion. It’s somewhat analogous to the virus that spreads fast along computers and networks by replicating itself when a user opens an application. For more information regarding this course you can visit our website: https://www.educba.com/6-highly-operative-viral-marketing-techniques/
          America is hooked on credit cards — and it's pretty clear why (JPM, TSYS)   

shopping

Americans have racked up $1.01 trillion in revolving debt — primarily credit card debt — according to the Federal Reserve. That's the highest tally since the financial crisis in 2008. 

The credit card is now the preferred method of payment among Americans, edging out debit cards and cash, according to the 2016 US Payment Study by payment processing company Total Systems Services, or TSYS.

It's the first time credit cards claimed the top spot in the six years TSYS has been conducting the study, which surveys 1,000 consumers who hold at least one debt card and one credit card (you can read more about their methodology on page four of the study).

Why have credit cards grown more popular? The study offers some insights as to why: 

Forty percent of respondents from the TSYS study picked credit cards as their favorite form of payment, followed by debit cards (35%), and cash (11%). Credit cards have been gaining on debit cards for several years now.



TSYS found that credit cards aren't universally loved, currying the most favor from older millennials.



Credit card love also skewed toward high-income households. The more money a household earns, the more they prefer credit cards.



See the rest of the story at Business Insider
          Millennials are flocking towards some of the most speculative ways to invest   

Magician trading floor

Millennials are big users of some of the most speculative investing instruments in the stock market, according to TD Ameritrade.

The brokerage firm told Business Insider that the roughly 18-35-year-old demographic made up about 40% of its new customers. Almost half of their trades came from mobile devices, said Victor Jones, the director of trading at TD Ameritrade. 

"Trades from mobile tend to be more futures-based," Jones said. "More people are gravitating towards derivatives like options and futures." 

"When you have your phone on you, you're available to look at the markets 24/7, but the markets aren't open 24/7," Jones said. "Futures give millennials or any investor the opportunity to participate in the market 24/7."

Instead of buying a specific asset class like a company's stock or a currency, futures and options contracts allow traders to profit from their bets on future prices and to hedge losses on what they already own.

Jones doesn't see mobile trading as the reason why more people are moving towards derivatives that aren't tied to the 9:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. ET stock-market schedule.

More investors — millennial and older — understand they can use these instruments to manage portfolio risks, Jones said. Derivatives trading made up about 45% of TD Ameritrade's transactions, he said, up from about 10% in 2009.

"They're gravitating towards the trading strategies that can help them limit their risk, limit their capital exposure, and generate additional yield on the portfolio," Jones said. 

Coincidentally, Interactive Brokers had captured this in a TV commercial in which a woman interrupts her dinner with a man to "do some hedging trades" on her phone because global markets are crashing after Russia downed a NATO plane.  

Even as derivatives trading may demonstrate a certain sophistication among millennial traders, it could also reflect their outsized stomach for risk, since they have a longer runway to earn returns from the market. A TD Ameritrade spokesperson said the most popular options strategies included covered calls, through which a trader can hedge on a long position in an asset. The options education page was consistently among the firm's top-five most visited, she added.

"I agree that derivatives do have unique risk characteristics," Jones said. "We are passionate about ensuring that our clients are aware of the unique risk characteristics."

SEE ALSO: Super-rich millennials are defying the way their parents have been investing for decades

DON'T MISS: The most important charts in the world from the brightest minds on Wall Street

Join the conversation about this story »

NOW WATCH: An economist explains what could happen if Trump pulls the US out of NAFTA


          Only In Russia: New Vending Machine Sells Instagram Likes And Followers   

Instagram logo on smart phone

If you’re a traveler of the internet, there’s no doubt you’ve come across some oddball things out of Russia. Some of the newest tech to come out of the country is none other than a vending machine that sells Instagram likes and followers.

Long gone are the days where buying iPods, makeup, and pizza were bizarre vending machine trends. The tech world is burgeoning into the mall kiosk market, and millennials are all about it.

The odd machine went viral last month after Russian journalist Vasily Sonkin spotted the flashy mechanism while out shopping. His colleague Alexey Kovalev was shocked and expressed his disdain on Twitter soon after. He calls the machine “the worst excesses of capitalism” and his message has already been re-tweeted over 5500 times.

Click here to continue and read more...


          Comment on Millennial Marriage Vows by John M. Harris   
I'm not sure there is an easy "fix." I think, on the individual level, before one gets married they've got to go through some good marriage counseling where and get real. Even talk through possible scenarios. What if they lose their job? What if we have to move? What about when we have kids? I will NEVER leave you, even if you cheat on me, I will be your husband/wife. I always walk through the actual marriage vows I ask them to say, and I try to get them to see what they are saying. At the end of the day, we're sinful people, if that other person isn't committed to following Jesus no matter what, they might bail. The real "fix" is to change our culture, and that will take a long long time. We have to hold up marriage and make it a REAL VOW. 40 years ago when our culture decided "no fault divorce" was a good idea we began to destroy marriage. Legally, I'd like to see us introduce contracts or something to strengthen the marriage vows. In other words, a contract on top of a marriage certificate, a pre-nup, that says something like "if I divorce you, you have a right to 80% of our community property" etc. Ultimately though, it's a matter of the heart. Pray pray pray and don't compromise on who you marry, and who you are. Put Jesus FIRST. If we marry and are faithful to someone because we love them... at some point, that won't be enough. We should marry and be faithful because we love Jesus.
          Comment on Millennial Marriage Vows by Matt M.   
Sadly, In todays world, your comments seem to be the norm. I agree that the current epidemic of "Till I want something else do us part" is pervading our society. I am currently going through the final stage of Divorce, and I thought, when I married that it would be "till death do us part", but it wasn't. The part that was missing was a commitment to those vows. Without a commitment, There is no Vow. Please help us understand the "fix". I'm just opening discussion for an answer.
          The musical, millennial life of 'Baby Driver's' Ansel Elgort   
… was deep into a club music period when he found himself … action-musical "Baby Driver." (Sony/TriStar)Ever since the … for the young Elgort; electronic musicians like Avicii came into … someone else’s puzzle. But music, this is my puzzle. — …
          The musical, millennial life of 'Baby Driver's' Ansel Elgort   

Ansel Elgort was deep into a club music period when he found himself on the spot during a pivotal audition for director Edgar Wright . He'd been spending his spare time in the studio with Swedish House Mafia's Steve Angello , living and breathing the electronic dance jams he makes under his DJ moniker, Anslo.


          Comment on Plans for 520-Foot Tower at Van Ness and Market Have Been Drawn by Dave   
San Francisco is not Pittsburg. Pittsburg has less than half the population of SF and 10% more area. It is far less dense. It has a diversified economy from banking to finance to robotics to health care to hi-tech. 15 of the Forbes top 500 companies are headquartered there. The city is far more open and green in its downtown area. It is one of the most affordable cities in the US in terms of housing. The Economist has ranked it the most livable city in the US in recent years. All that and it's hi-tech is booming - it's now called the Silicon Strip. It's the number 2 most popular city for millennials. It's not surprising locals are enthusiastic about Pittsburgh in a way they are not about SF.
          How would young people resolve custody and parenting time disputes?   
What do Millennials think of the U.S. family law system? How would it run if they were in charge? Professor Jennifer Harman, of Colorado State University, answered this question with some of her research at the International Conference on Shared Parenting 2017. Harman introduced her research by pointing out that “decisions in family court are largely discretionary,” consistent […]
          Comment on Shocking Study Shows Mere Presence of Smartphone Reduces Brain Power — Even When It’s Off by Gander   
When cell phones became computers via the "Smart Phone", everyone who had one spent at least half the day multi-tasking...simultaneously checking their phone while doing practically everything else. A few interesting tidbits about how Smart Phones are changing our ability to focus, think and remember. Bread and circuses...now the circus is right in the palm of your hand. 1. A study from Baylor University recently showed that female college students spend an average of 10 hours per day interacting with their cell phone, cruising shopping sites, social media networks like Facebook, Instagram, Pinterest and Twitter, and sending nearly 100 texts. College males spend an average of eight hours per day on their phones doing utilitarian and entertainment activities. Of the students in the study, all millennials, 60% admitted they were probably addicted while acknowledging the related risks to their academic performance. Many even said they felt anxious when their phone wasn’t in sight. When millennials are spending more time on their phones than they do sleeping, how can they expect to get through an 8-hour workday being separated from it? Roberts, James et al. (2014). The invisible addiction: cell-phone activities and addiction among male and female college students. Journal of Behavioral Addiction, 3(4), 254-265. Doi: 10.1556/JBA.3.2014.015. 2. According to research from Stanford University, multi-taskers can’t pay attention, access their memory or switch to another task as well as someone performing just one action. Filtering out irrelevant information is harder for them, as well as applying what they’ve learned when compared to those who focus on a singular activity. Of greater concern are the new neural pathways media gadget addicts create in the brain, altering its physical structure and even the process by which they learn. When we perform one task, the hippocampus (responsible for memory recall) is in charge. When attention gets divided, the hippocampus of multi-taskers switches off. According to research at the University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA), other areas of the brain not suited to memory functions have to compensate, making information recall more difficult. Ophir, N et al. (2009). Cognitive control in media multitaskers. Proceedings of the National Academy of Science of the United States of America. 1-5. Foerde, K et al. (2006). Modulation of competing memory systems by distraction. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America. 103(31), 11778-11783. 3. Most parents have seen their children lose interest in the family once they get plugged in with media gadgets, but adults aren’t doing much better. A poll from The New York Times showed 1 in 7 people said they spend less time with their partner because of media. Even more shocking, 1 in 10 openly admitted to spending less time with their children, too. Connelly, M. (2010). More Americans sense a downside to an always plugged-in existence. The New York Times.
          Why our obsession with disaster films reveals something positive about humanity   

twister oklahoma"Twister"/Warner Bros.

Every blockbuster wants to destroy the world. We explore where that impulse comes from.

Human beings are funny creatures. Summer after summer, year after year, we fork over countless dollars to catch the latest iteration of an ancient story: the sky is falling; the Earth is dying; bring on the end of the world. It’s the season of the disaster film.

Of course, all fiction thrives on conflict and calamity, in part because storytelling allows us to live out our nightmares without cost or consequence. But there’s something undeniably odd about the impulse toward apocalypse that characterizes so much of our popular cinema. We should expect alien visitors, were they not so frequently featured in such films, to be deeply puzzled at this peculiar human ritual.

The oddity is compounded by the fact that, in recent years, the trappings of the disaster film have overtaken other genres as well. None of this summer’s major blockbusters is a disaster film in the classical sense, but The Mummy, Wonder Woman, War for the Planet of the Apes, and Transformers: The Last Knight all feature collapsing buildings and existential stakes.

Wonder WomanWarner Bros. PicturesIt often seems that, against the backdrop of the 24-hour news cycle, only extinction events feel consequential enough to propel blockbuster drama. Exceptions exist, of course, including James Mangold’s admirably humble Logan and Christopher Nolan’s Gotham-centric Dark Knight trilogy. But for the most part, a blockbuster that doesn’t put the world on the line is no blockbuster at all.

Certain obvious explanations for this trend present themselves. The imperatives of the international box office drive all big-budget films toward bigger, clearer narratives, and it’s easy to see why a global threat might have broader appeal than a provincial one. The subtleties of language and gesture that make up a small-scale drama are far harder to translate than a meteor demolishing a skyscraper.

Plus there’s the fact that disaster spectacles remain, for the time being, unique to the big screen. Promise to level an entire city and fewer viewers will want to wait for the streaming release.

But in our rush to turn every conceivable conflict into a colossal one, we’ve forgotten what disaster films, at their best, can offer. The purpose of the disaster film is not to make small conflicts bigger but to make big ones smaller – to reduce unthinkable catastrophes to a human scale.

Our indifference to genocides and natural disasters the world over suggests that we are poorly equipped to care about massive tragedies. It is only when these tragedies are expressed through individuals that we are able to empathize. We don’t care about the people because of the disaster; we care about the disaster because of the people.

Andrei Tarkovsky once wrote that the meaning of cinema was “relating a person to the whole world.” And though it’s difficult to imagine Tarkovsky lining up for a Roland Emmerich film, his aphorism describes the potential toward which great disaster films can aspire.

For all the ethical abandon with which some disaster films kill off their characters, the perspective they can afford is accurate. Most of the dramas we tend to care about are, in the scheme of things, insignificant – and so they would seem, were we faced with impending doom. We are apes on a rock tearing through a void. It’s about time we stuck together.

Twister

twister oklahoma"Twister"/Warner Bros.

Widely maligned by critics upon its release, Twister holds a special place in the heart of many a millennial, thanks in part to the popular ride at Universal Studios. The film’s plot is laughable on its face: a retired storm-chaser returns home to get his divorce papers signed, only to be wrapped up in a quest to study an F5 tornado.

Silly though it may sound, the film is executed with such flare and infectious enthusiasm that it’s difficult not to get swept up (pun intended). Led by the charming Bill Paxton and the always-stellar Helen Hunt, with supporting performances by Philip Seymour Hoffman and Cary Elwes, the film transcends its hokey storyline to become a first-rate entertainment.

The Core

There’s a profound satisfaction to be found in loving a film that others find ridiculous. I have loved many such films — The Village, Across the Universe, Airheads – but none of my favorites is so broadly hated as The Core. The film, which concerns a ragtag team’s attempt to restore the spinning of the earth’s core, could easily be relabeled “generic disaster movie.” Its trailer is full of lines like “everybody’s dead in a year” and “we killed the planet.”

Aaron Eckhart stars in a role that failed to establish him as a leading man, but he admirably holds together a cast that includes Hilary Swank and Stanley Tucci. At the very least, The Core is instructive for laying the conventions of its genre so blatantly bare. 

The Day After Tomorrow

the day after tomorrow 20th Century Fox20th Century Fox

Disaster films nearly always contain some not-so-subtle commentary on our mistreatment of the environment, but this one was so topical upon its release that it could have been shown as a double-feature with An Inconvenient Truth. Directed by disaster filmmaker extraordinaire Roland Emmerich, The Day After Tomorrow tells the story of a paleoclimatologist played by Jake Gyllenhaal who’s forced to lead a group of survivors when a superstorm floods, then freezes, New York City.

It is a hamfisted cautionary tale about global warming (which, via the film’s scientific hand-waving, produces an ice age), but it also functions as a powerful 9/11 allegory, celebrating the ability of New Yorkers to unify in the face of tragedy.

Independence Day

Independence Day set the stage for the modern disaster film, lending new levels of visual spectacle (the film picked up an Oscar for visual effects) and global appeal to the genre. There is something refreshing about the film’s eschewal of any subtlety in its treatment of alien invasion: they’re here to kill us, we’re told, so we have to kill them first.

It is in reaction to a film like Independence Day, which features a mad-dog Randy Quaid blowing up an alien ship kamikaze-style, that a film like Arrival gets made, which features a somber Amy Adams writing messages on a whiteboard. I, for one, am glad that the cinematic ecosystem can bear both.

Armageddon

ArmageddonWalt Disney Studios

No list of disaster films would be complete without some Bayhem. Armageddon, like The Core, is positively ludicrous from a narrative perspective: a group of oil-drillers are sent to space to stop an asteroid from destroying the planet.

But as an exercise in style and genre, the film stands up – if only because Michael Bay’s shameless, sweeping, dynamic style has been so influential in Hollywood since. Even the Criterion Collection, those great arbiters of cinematic taste and distinction, saw fit to recognize the film with a laserdisc. Perhaps in fifty years time, we’ll be reevaluating Bay’s work the way French critics reevaluated Hitchcock. That is, if an asteroid doesn’t wipe us out first.

NOW WATCH: JIM ROGERS: The worst crash in our lifetime is coming


          America is hooked on credit cards — and it's pretty clear why (JPM, TSYS)   

shoppingShutterstock/Adam Supawadee

Americans have racked up $1.01 trillion in revolving debt — primarily credit card debt — according to the Federal Reserve. That's the highest tally since the financial crisis in 2008. 

The credit card is now the preferred method of payment among Americans, edging out debit cards and cash, according to the 2016 US Payment Study by payment processing company Total Systems Services, or TSYS.

It's the first time credit cards claimed the top spot in the six years TSYS has been conducting the study, which surveys 1,000 consumers who hold at least one debt card and one credit card (you can read more about their methodology on page four of the study).

Why have credit cards grown more popular? The study offers some insights as to why: 

Forty percent of respondents from the TSYS study picked credit cards as their favorite form of payment, followed by debit cards (35%), and cash (11%). Credit cards have been gaining on debit cards for several years now.

Samantha Lee/Business Insider; TSYS

TSYS found that credit cards aren't universally loved, currying the most favor from older millennials.

Samantha Lee/Business Insider; TSYS

Credit card love also skewed toward high-income households. The more money a household earns, the more they prefer credit cards.

Samantha Lee/Business Insider; TSYS


See the rest of the story at Business Insider

          Millennials are flocking towards some of the most speculative ways to invest   

Magician trading floorReuters/Kai Pfaffenbach

Millennials are big users of some of the most speculative investing instruments in the stock market, according to TD Ameritrade.

The brokerage firm told Business Insider that the roughly 18-35-year-old demographic made up about 40% of its new customers. Almost half of their trades came from mobile devices, said Victor Jones, the director of trading at TD Ameritrade. 

"Trades from mobile tend to be more futures-based," Jones said. "More people are gravitating towards derivatives like options and futures." 

"When you have your phone on you, you're available to look at the markets 24/7, but the markets aren't open 24/7," Jones said. "Futures give millennials or any investor the opportunity to participate in the market 24/7."

Instead of buying a specific asset class like a company's stock or a currency, futures and options contracts allow traders to profit from their bets on future prices and to hedge losses on what they already own.

Jones doesn't see mobile trading as the reason why more people are moving towards derivatives that aren't tied to the 9:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. ET stock-market schedule.

More investors — millennial and older — understand they can use these instruments to manage portfolio risks, Jones said. Derivatives trading made up about 45% of TD Ameritrade's transactions, he said, up from about 10% in 2009.

"They're gravitating towards the trading strategies that can help them limit their risk, limit their capital exposure, and generate additional yield on the portfolio," Jones said. 

Coincidentally, Interactive Brokers had captured this in a TV commercial in which a woman interrupts her dinner with a man to "do some hedging trades" on her phone because global markets are crashing after Russia downed a NATO plane.  

Even as derivatives trading may demonstrate a certain sophistication among millennial traders, it could also reflect their outsized stomach for risk, since they have a longer runway to earn returns from the market. A TD Ameritrade spokesperson said the most popular options strategies included covered calls, through which a trader can hedge on a long position in an asset. The options education page was consistently among the firm's top-five most visited, she added.

"I agree that derivatives do have unique risk characteristics," Jones said. "We are passionate about ensuring that our clients are aware of the unique risk characteristics."

NOW WATCH: An economist explains the key issues that Trump needs to address to boost the economy


          Meet the Activists With a Plan to Make Climate Change Matter in Elections   

Since Donald Trump declared that he was withdrawing the United States from the Paris Agreement, elected officials around the country have been engaged in something they usually try to avoid: serious conversation about climate change. In fact, the leaders of 300-plus U.S. cities and 22 states have now pledged to uphold the goals of the global climate deal.

This unlikely behavior follows a presidential election where climate change received virtually no attention -- just 82 seconds during the debates, which was actually an improvement on the 2012 debates. Despite the positive trend of recent weeks, however, climate change is still quite far from being a campaign issue for most politicians. For their part, climate activists have tended to avoid making it one, rallying around specific issues rather than candidates.

One group of climate activists is seeking to change all that. Calling themselves Sunrise Movement, this group -- founded by a core team of eight organizers, most under the age of 30 -- plan to recruit and train a nonviolent volunteer army, hundreds strong, that will shake up the 2018 midterm elections and make 2020 the first presidential election about climate change. I spoke to co-founder Varshini Prakash about how Sunrise came together, the importance of not choosing between elections and protest, and why climate deniers don't stand a chance when you are speaking to people's needs.

How did Sunrise come about?

Back in 2015, a bunch of us were working in different parts of the climate movement. Some of us were leading campus-based fossil fuel divestment campaigns working to stigmatize the fossil fuel industry and revoke its social license to act. Others were figuring out how to build political power in red and purple states. And another set of us were working on place-based extraction or pollution fights. What we all had in common is that we found ourselves asking one question again and again: Are we enough? Are we building the movement we need to stop the climate crisis? Are we getting active participation by the millions? Are we winning? Clearly, the answer was no. So, a group of us coalesced around a singular objective: to build a mass popular movement capable of ending Big Oil's assault on our climate, economy and democracy.

We met several times to figure out the parameters of this new movement, and we were well on our way to having a full plan. And then, in November, the election happened and everything changed. Like most progressives, we had entertained the thought of Donald Trump winning, but never quite got to a place of sitting down and figuring out how the world might look different, and how we would react and respond if he did. We had had a plan to focus on building popular support for climate change, anticipating that a Democratic president would be pushed to take action on climate if a majority of Americans wanted it and made enough noise. But our world had turned upside down, and there was no way that popular opinion and action would push a Republican trifecta government to care about climate change. When the dust settled we came to an important realization: we have to figure out how to win elections.

Have you gained any insights toward that goal?

After reflecting deeply on our wins and losses, we came up with three key principles. First, if we ignore elections and the power that's on the table, we'll lose. Second, the gains made through creative protest have been powerful, but they will only be protected if we achieve institutional, political power. And, finally, if we elect people who only care about the climate crisis in name, but are unwilling to stand up to the fossil fuel industry in practice, we'll also lose. So we must merge electoral organizing with creative protest to build, alongside others, a political force great enough to win.

Sunrise is doing just that. We are building an army of young people to stop climate change and create millions of good-paying jobs in the process. We will make climate change an urgent priority across America, expose the corrupting influence of fossil fuel executives on our democracy, and elect leaders who stand up for the health and well being of all people. We see ourselves as part of a political revolution to make real the promise of a society that works for all of us, not just the 1 percent.

By making elections a focus of your work, you will certainly be filling a gap within the climate movement. Why do you think that gap existed?

For too long we've seen the climate movement get totally derailed by four-year election cycles, or experience them as a distant distraction. That's because many in the climate movement have not really tapped into the deep frustration about how our political system is not responding to and reflecting the concerns of everyday people. Such frustration is especially deep among our generation. We have been losing on climate for the same reasons that we have been losing on healthcare, inequality, education and racial justice -- our economy and democracy are rigged in favor of the wealthy and powerful. The climate movement must be part of the emerging political revolution that is taking on the billionaire class from many angles.

That being said, we're not leaving behind the legacy of nonviolent protest that has won so many things for working people in this country. Marches, demonstrations and sit-ins will be a part of the plan, but so will door-knocking and candidate recruitment.

In what ways are you planning to connect and work with other groups in the climate movement?

The core aspects of our strategy will require us to work with a variety of groups in the climate movement. To build public support, we'll collaborate with other organizations that are really good at protest and organizing. And we know for sure we can't win elections on our own, so we plan to link up with others to contest for political power as well.

In the end, we're ready to work with any group that's excited about our strategy and aligned with our understanding of how we make change.

My introduction to political advocacy was in the divestment campaign at UMass-Amherst. Divestment campaigning is close to my heart. It's one of the most effective methods for eroding the power of Big Oil -- especially for college students -- and we don't see that changing.

We hope divestment campaigners will join up with Sunrise to translate the people power they're building through divestment into the political power we'll need to end Big Oil's influence in Washington.

Sunrise is also a logical next step for students moving on from divestment campaigning because either they win their campaign (like we did at UMass), leave school or decide it's no longer the most effective way to build power on their campus.

What are the immediate next steps for Sunrise?

Our strategy follows a simple pattern over the next four years, through the 2020 election: disrupt, vote, disrupt, vote. We're launching this summer and fall with a series of trainings in 10 politically significant states to build our people power. In August, when our politicians have left the halls of Congress and must answer to us at home, we'll rally young people across the country to go to their townhalls and events. We want them to ask their representatives what they're doing to end Big Oil's assault on our climate, economy and democracy. After that, we'll be engaging in primary fights between populists and establishment politicians. We'll be doubling down on bringing in as many new people to the movement as possible and taking action in myriad ways -- both domestically and internationally -- to spread our message and expose the corrupt entanglement of fossil fuel CEOs and our political system.

All this will feed into our biggest program, which will take place next summer. We're going to bring together 300 youth for a training that prepares them to spend six months of their lives talking to people and growing our movement up to the 2018 midterms. If we do it right, by November 2018, we'll see climate as a major issue during the elections and beyond, and we'll win races to elect climate champions to office. This includes electing a people's president and Congress in 2020, alongside the many other groups that make up the political revolution.

Were you inspired by any particular models when you built out this plan?

Much of our foundational frameworks for Sunrise came from the Momentum model, which is a hybrid of mass protest and structure-based organizing, as described in Paul and Mark Engler's book, "This Is an Uprising." From there, we improvised and pulled together thinking from different parts of the left, especially after the election. We took direction from the Bernie Sanders campaign -- specifically its innovations on volunteer-led, decentralized teams and structures. We studied a variety of organizations -- from political parties to community groups -- that experimented with building on-ramps for mass participation. In the end, it's a process of experimentation. We're staying flexible, so that we can do more of what works and stop doing what doesn't.

Has the approach to climate action changed with Trump's rejection of the Paris climate deal and his green lighting of the Dakota Access and Keystone XL pipelines?

The last few months have made it clear how critical it is to translate our people power into political power. Our most prominent federal victories from the last eight years have been undone within the first few months of the Trump presidency. It's clear that social movements cannot afford any longer to be external agents railing against a hostile government that is not accountable or responsible to the majority of Americans. We have to win political power so we can defend our gains permanently and push for further action on climate and beyond.

On a different note, the Paris rollback is galvanizing thousands to action. People are coming out of the woodwork, ready to contribute in any way they can. It's up to movement leaders to find meaningful and impactful ways for all these people to participate.

What do you make of cities and states going their own way, post-Paris?

One of the justifications Trump gave for pulling out of the Paris Agreement was that he was going to help Americans, saying in his withdraw speech that he was doing that because "he was elected by the voters of Pittsburgh, not Paris." Of course, Pittsburgh voted for Hillary Clinton by a huge margin, and its Mayor Bill Peduto has committed to follow the Paris Agreement. The truth is that Trump was pulling out of this agreement to benefit his fossil fuel allies, not the American people. The majority of Americans in every single state support the Paris Agreement. The groundswell of mayors and governors from across the country committing to uphold the Paris Agreement show the depth of Americans' support for decisive climate action.

This is an important message to send to the world, and we applaud local and state leaders for taking this action. Unfortunately, these commitments only do so much, and we're still going in the wrong direction overall. The scale and speed of the transition to renewables that we need will require a large-scale mobilization from all parts of society, and the federal government is going to be a critical part of this. We need to get serious about taking back Congress and the White House.

Climate activists have long battled fake news and climate deniers. How are you preparing to deal with them?

We're done arguing about whether climate change is real. Americans understand that climate change is real, human-caused, and needs to be urgently addressed. Seventy-eight percent of Americans want the federal government to take action to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, and 91 percent of millennials support transitioning America to 100 percent clean energy by 2050.

Let's stop trying to convince people to "believe in climate change" and start asking them if they want to bring millions of clean jobs to this country. Let's ask if they want to breathe clean air and drink clean water. Let's ask if they want their children to live asthma free and their mountains and rivers to remain healthy and intact. Let's ask if they want America to do right by its working people, and assert that it's possible for the future to not be riddled with cancer and black lung disease.

When we speak in terms of people's needs and dreams rather than inanimate carbon-things, deniers don't stand a chance.


          Newswire: Old millennials re-brand as the more palatable “Xennials”   

Whether it’s out of hatred of avocado toast, love for Applebee’s and/or diamonds, or a lack of emotional connection to the works of J.K. Rowling, some of us on the older end of the divide (this writer was born in 1983) have never felt truly at home with the “millennial” label. The generation baby boomers love to label as lazy, entitled, and self-centered—even though that’s at least partially their fault, given that they raised us—is ill-defined compared to the boomers, who the U.S. Census Bureau define as those born between 1946 and 1964. Millennials, meanwhile, begin as early as 1977 or as late as 1983, depending on who you ask. The idea of a sub-generation, sometimes referred to as the “Oregon Trail Generation” or “Generation Catalano,” has been echoing across the internet for a few years, and has now re-emerged three years ...


          The musical, millennial life of 'Baby Driver's' Ansel Elgort   
The star of 'Baby Driver,' and budding EDM musician, opens up about how music shapes his life
          The musical, millennial life of 'Baby Driver's' Ansel Elgort   
The star of 'Baby Driver,' and budding EDM musician, opens up about how music shapes his life
          The musical, millennial life of 'Baby Driver's' Ansel Elgort   
The star of 'Baby Driver,' and budding EDM musician, opens up about how music shapes his life Reported by L.A. Times 4 hours ago.
          7/2/2017: NEWS: Avo look at this waste of money   

STEP aside smashed avocado — the latest trend swallowing the dollars of Millennials and keeping them out of home ownership is espresso martinis. Espresso martinis, which typically sell for $20, combine two Aussie favourites in coffee and alcohol — and...
          Comment on Our Live Coverage Of St. John Festival Activities Has Been Cut Short Because Of Poor Internet Service by Scott Douglas   
Millennials and Generation Y are the same people.
          Is Saying 'I Do' REALLY A Thing Of The Past?    
video
Photo: weheartit
saying i do

Is traditional marriage evolving, or fading fast? Our Experts break down the facts and myths about the state of marriage in modern society.

Keywords: getting married, Marriage, single and looking, single and loving it, never getting married, millennial, modern marriage, Marriage Advice,, before getting married

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          The musical, millennial life of 'Baby Driver's' Ansel Elgort   
The star of 'Baby Driver,' and budding EDM musician, opens up about how music shapes his life
          ‘Poor little snowflake’ – the defining insult of 2016   

The term ‘snowflake’ has been thrown around with abandon in the wake of Brexit and the US election, usually to express generic disdain for young people. How can we neutralise its power – and is it a bad metaphor anyway?

Between the immediate aftermath of Brexit and the US presidential election, one insult began to seem inescapable, mostly lobbed from the right to the left: “snowflake.” Independent MEP Janice Atkinson, who was expelled from Ukip over allegations of expenses fraud, wrote a piece for the Huffington Post decrying the “wet, teary and quite frankly ludicrous outpouring of grief emails” she had received post-referendum as “snowflake nonsense”. The far-right news site Breitbart, whose executive chairman Stephen Bannon is now Donald Trump’s chief strategist, threw it around with abandon, using it as a scattershot insult against journalists, celebrities and millennials who objected to Trump’s inflammatory rhetoric; its UK site used it last week to criticise a proposed “class liberation officer” at an Oxford college who would provide more support for working-class students.

On an episode of his long-running podcast in August, Bret Easton Ellis discussed the criticism of a lascivious LA Weekly story about the pop star Sky Ferreira with a furious riposte to what he calls “little snowflake justice warriors”: “Oh, little snowflakes, when did you all become grandmothers and society matrons, clutching your pearls in horror at someone who has an opinion about something, a way of expressing themselves that’s not the mirror image of yours, you snivelling little weak-ass narcissists?”

Continue reading...
          3 Key Pillars of the Modern Enterprise   

What runs the modern enterprise?

“It’s not what you know. It’s what you do with what you know.”

So says Daniel Newman in a January 2017 Forbes article. This pretty well sums up the quest for the modern enterprise to use all the data available to drive increased productivity, reduced costs, business innovation, and personalized customer experiences.

Businesses that do invest in developing big data capabilities are finally starting to see results. In fact, Randy Bean at Harvard Business Review reports that, for the first time since he began surveying Fortune 1000 companies in 2012, almost half now say their businesses are “achieving measurable results from their big data investments.” Where are they finding value in big data?

  • Almost 50% have decreased expenses.
  • Almost 45% have found new innovation avenues.
  • Just over 36% have launched new products and/or services.
Business Must Move Fast

To capitalize on big data, businesses can’t take their time analyzing it; they can’t bring in consultants or experts, run reports, consolidate the data for six to nine months, and then make a business decision. The business will die. To keep the business not just alive, but growing, it’s imperative to make decisions in real time.
 
Doing this requires three components, or pillars: data, users, and applications.

Building the Modern Mobile Enterprise: 3 Key Pillars

The first of these three components is data, and this is the foundation of the other two.
 
Data

Data is produced by activity. Every time an employee or a customer completes some activity, there’s the potential to collect information about that activity. If that data is collected, it can be used to mitigate risk, modify and improve business processes, respond to customers faster, or create new products and services to meet a need.
 
With the growing use of the Internet of Things (IoT), machine learning, artificial intelligence, predictive analytics, and more, the collection of data creates more data. In a recent Network World article, Ash Ashutosh expanded on this idea:
 
“…there is a constant iterative process of data creation, processing, analysis and sharing/selling. Data created by an IoT sensor or social media app has little value at the time of creation. The value increases exponentially when it is then used to develop applications, further analyzed for targeted outcomes, and sold to consumers or other vendors. Even the database in an Oracle Exadata appliance becomes more business critical as hundreds of developers and data scientists need to access and analyze the data.”
 
Users

That brings us to the second pillar: users. When it comes to data, the most important information businesses want is customer insights. They want to know as much as they can so that they can develop targeted products, services, solutions, and experiences. It doesn’t matter whether the customer is a consumer, a business, or an internal stakeholder—that is, an employee.
 
Customers of every kind now expect a highly responsive experience. When they are looking for a product or service, searching for information, or completing a transaction, they expect a real-time experience. And businesses are meeting this demand by creating more responsive apps—the third key pillar for the modern enterprise.
 
Apps

The apps are the interface between the data and users. In the modern mobile world, businesses need to interface with customers with any device, through any type of app. These applications—like IoT sensors or mobile apps—are the conduit for gathering data and processing it to deliver what the user wants and needs.
 
We now have the three pillars: We have the users who are creating activity. That activity creates data. That data is then transferred by an application to systems that can process it in real time and respond to the user, again via the app. So how does a business make it all work together? It’s all about the infrastructure.

Help Wanted: A Single Integrated Platform

In the late 20th century, data was siloed. Finance wanted to report numbers. Manufacturing wanted to improve a process. Sales was looking for insights to drive opportunities. Marketing began to use data to measure its influence on the bottom line. But businesses can’t afford to assemble disparate systems and then take months to launch a new application or analytics service.
 
Businesses run on information—data—and most of it lives in databases that power business growth. But how can businesses make sure they, as well as customers, are getting the most from these insights?
 
Every function in the enterprise today must be able to access data, and process that data from a single platform. Systems need to converge—and that has created problems for companies. Many enterprises still have legacy or multi-vendor architectures. The typical approach to building a database infrastructure to manage data is to use the same generic servers and storage as elsewhere in the data center—but databases are not generic workloads. Generic infrastructure can create problems that delay application deployment and query response times, affecting business and revenue growth.
 
Oracle helps companies overcome this challenge by offering cloud-ready engineered systems which are uniquely optimized for Oracle software, enabling enterprises to streamline and modernize their infrastructure. And only Oracle provides a single architecture with three consumption models: on premises, public cloud, or public cloud behind your firewall enabling you to deliver superior results today, with cloud insurance for the future to deal with structured and unstructured data. What Oracle offers is essentially an infrastructure version of the smartphone. With your phone, you turn it on, and it works; all the apps are there. You can download what you want. You don’t have to worry about configuring anything or setting up any hardware. Everything is optimized to run on the OS, and run the apps.
 
The infrastructure we’re bringing is purpose-built to run the Oracle database and applications. If you’re going to run the Oracle database, take the infrastructure that’s been optimized and co-engineered with the Oracle database and applications. Software is integrated under the hardware specifically for the Oracle database and applications, and that’s what we’re bringing with the cloud-ready engineered systems  that Oracle delivers. And if you want to move to the cloud, all you have to do is say, “Okay. Move my database to the cloud.”

Major Bank Optimizes the Three Pillars to Drive Innovation

Caixa Bank is a shining example of how business can optimize its investment in big data. As Spain’s largest domestic bank, serving 14 million customers, Caixa was looking for new models to serve a changing market, including the millennial customers who expect to conduct business digitally. Using the Oracle Big Data solution that includes Exadata, Big Data Appliance, and Exalytics, Caixa can load the data into the environment best suited for the type of data or the way it’s received, and use that data to develop applications independently, no matter where the data is located.
 
Responding to the demanding financial business environment, Caixa is capturing data in real time from its customers. It’s now able to take big data and apply it to every department of the bank. For example, it uses the data to provide personalized offers to individual customers, and to create predictive models that improve risk management. Watch their story here:

Helping Enterprises Realize the Potential of Big Data

Cloud-ready engineered systems help bring together data, users, and apps—the three key pillars of the modern enterprise. They simplify and modernize the enterprise, unleashing the power of data to make better business decisions, deliver a better customer experience, and adapt to a fast-moving business environment. I believe we’re helping businesses become the agile organizations that will survive and win.

To learn more about how your company can flourish in the Data Capital Economy, read the MIT and Oracle collaboration on the Rise of Data Capital.


          Denim Unbound with Nico Bulzico as Brand Ambassador for SM Men Denim at SM Supermalls   

Wazzup Pilipinas!

At a venue filled with younger Millennials, my companion and I were feeling fashion bloggers covering the newest #SMMenDenim ambassador, Nico Bolzico, along with the SM Youth ambassadors at the #DenimUnbound event of SM Supermalls.

Together with SM Youth ambassadors like Tommy Esguerra, Kaila Estrada, Richard Juan, Janna Tee, Kyle Perry, Macauly Lofgren and Erika Kristensen, and also with #SMYouthGoSee Season 2 ex-contestants namely Chelsea Manalo, Ethan Salvador, Mariah Jowett, Justin Llarena and Klaudio Gutierrez, we have Nico Bolzico now on the runway as he is launched as the newest SM Men ambassador for #SMMenDenim at the #DenimUnbound event held at SM Makati.

For those who do not know Nico Bolzico, he is the husband of Solenn Heussaff, celebrity, entrepreneur and model as well.

Find out what Nico whispered into my ear when I attempted to interview him after the launch.....hehehe ..It was a shocking revelation...too much to handle for little ol' me.

Seriously, I asked the guy on how often he washes his jeans, and he said "I don't think I even wash my jeans." or something to that effect. I'm sure he was just joking but many could really relate to the fact that most of us use our jeans or denim for several days, even weeks, before we send them to the laundry.

Be sure to check out the video interview we did amidst the very noisy venue brought about by DJs playing loud music to set the mood.




This event was held on Saturday, July 1, at the 2nd level of the mall. It was not a very big venue for so many ambassadors, and the seats were only a few intended for the media and other VIPs. Wazzup Pilipinas is fortunate to have been included even though we are lifestyle bloggers. I believe majority of the attendees were fashion bloggers and influencers all dressed up in their own fashion style - from a simple shirt and jeans to elegant yet hip casuals.

I guess there was really no room for interview as the event is more on showcasing the many denim options available at SM Supermalls.

There will be a repeat happening on July 22 at Mall of Asia (MOA), and since it's also open to the public, many of the fans of these ambassadors will get to see their idols.

There were also several opportunities for photo and video ops for the fans after the event so expect to have the same opportunity at MOA.


Above is an interview with Nico Bolzico done by the event host


Unlike other clothing, denim is tough and still look good even with dirt and imperfections. There are even denim designs that intentionally puts slashes and rips, and other various ingenious designs just to make the denim look fancier than normal.



The event was uniquely done with an elevator entrance where the models all came out from an elevator situated within the mall itself. Now I don't know if the idea was conceptualized because the venue was located where the elevators where, still kudos to the production and masterminds of the idea.

The only concern we had were the lights that were not really flattering for the photo and video coverage. I could have followed the setup of the videography and photography crew who positioned themselves from another end because even though we were comfortable sitting at our seats, getting the shots were kind of awkward from our spot. The models were going from one point to another and not simultaneously so expect that the camera was not able to follow everyone around.







Another familiar face at the #DenimUnbound event of SM Supermalls is Tommy Esguerra as one of the SM Youth Ambassadors.

The guy totally stood out among the rest with his looks - height, hair and hunky-ness. ..I could hear a rhyme with my words..hehehe

My companion admitted she has a crush on him... hahaha.. Tunay naman na nakaka-bading..



Of course he is among the first she had a selfie with.... including Nico Bolzico ,and with my brother from another mother who was just among the audience, Anton Edward Del Rosario Of Azkals Philippine Football Team.

Below is just a quickie preview of what happened at teh event but longer versions are currently being uploaded on our YouTube channel at http://www.YouTube.com/user/wazzuppilipinas


More photos (both from smartphone and camera) are also available at our official Facebook fan page at http://www.Facebook.com/wazzuppilipinas

          Comment on Movie Request by Μιχάλης Διαμάντης   
the millennial bee 1983 movie by juraj jakubisko
          I Enjoyed Being Able to Afford My Own Health Care: A Millennial Tale You Won't Be Hearing In the United States   
I battle a scary demon. And ever since I arrived here, South Korea has done nothing but feed that de
          The CEO of an investing startup taking in $12 million a day on the future of finance, millennials, and happiness   

jon stein ceo betterment 3Betterment

It took a year for the roboadviser Betterment to reach $10 million in assets under management.

That day, in 2011, was a big one for founder Jon Stein, 37, who set up the company after working at First Manhattan Consulting Group. He recalls going out to dinner that evening and being in awe of having so many people trust him and his company with their money. Now the company pulls in $12 million a day.

Betterment is the largest independent roboadviser in the world, with $9 billion under management and 270,000 customers. Betterment is currently valued at $700 million, according to a company spokeswoman.

Betterment provides financial advice online and via a smartphone app. Rather than using human managers to build portfolios, roboadvisers like Betterment use algorithms to determine where to invest. Global assets managed by robos could reach $13 trillion by 2025 in a best-case scenario, according to a group of equity analysts at Morgan Stanley. That would be up from $100 billion in December.

Betterment's growth has been impressive, but it still faces steep competition. The wealth-management space has caught on that roboadvisers are hot, and many big firms have rolled out their own robo offerings. Charles Schwab and Vanguard are two such giants with trillions of dollars in assets under management.

Stein is resolute in his belief, however, that those firms are rooted in the old way. Business Insider recently met up with Stein at Betterment's Manhattan office to talk about the company's journey, the future of wealth management and the firm, and happiness.

This interview has been edited for clarity and length.

Frank Chaparro: How's business?

Jon Stein: We have had an incredible run. We are the largest independent online financial adviser. And this has been a goal of ours since we started the company seven years ago. We just celebrated our seventh anniversary. We have grown something like 300% year-over-year for that entire time. When we first started out, it took us a year to get to $10 million assets under management. When we did, I couldn't believe it.

It took us another six months to get to $20 million. It then took us another three months to get to $30 million. We just kept growing faster and faster and faster. And today we bring in $10 million on an average day. Our business has changed a lot, in one sense. We are growing so well, and that growth is accelerating. And our offerings are much more sophisticated than when we started.

But in another sense, we are doing the same thing we have always been doing — that is, thinking about the customer and what the customer wants, and then building financial services in a way that actually responds to customer demands, which I think is not the way the old guard has done things. The old way just sells the product. The old way has the product they want to push. Our vision is that the service should be built around the customer and it should be very personalized. It should be built for their needs. It should be very convenient and strip away unnecessary complexities, and it should give them peace of mind.

robotEric Thayer/GettyChaparro: In February, Betterment rolled out an offering that would provide users with access to human financial advisers. It appears that the pure robo-only model is unsustainable and that firms have to go hybrid, with a bit of old and new. Was this the thought process behind the move?

Stein: Our goal, long-term, is to be our customers' central financial relationship. We want them to be able to manage everything in one place when they come to Betterment. We give them guidance about their full financial life with that holistic view. That's what customers want. They want that ability to manage everything in one place.

And that's why we rolled out Betterment Plus and Premium. We want to be able to answer any question our clients have. We want to make it clear to everyone that people can call us and get advice and guidance on any financial question. Just call us. I don't think we've been clear enough about that even today. I think there is more work to do. And I think you will see us over the course of the year rolling out better ways that make it really obvious that anyone can get financial advice here on anything. Because we have certified financial planners who are willing to answer any question.

Chaparro: It's been said that pure roboplatforms could face trouble if there is a downturn. Without that hand-holding and someone to talk to, investors might pull —

j00322_004_237BettermentStein: Says who? I don't think that prop really resonates with customers.

If you talk to customers and ask them, "What do you want from your financial adviser?" They don't say, "We really want someone who is going to be there for me during a downturn." That's a very industry-oriented way of thinking about justifying your value as a financial adviser. It's not really what customers care about or want. They want performance. The reason they hire us is because we maximize their money. That is core to our value.

Convenience is another. They want it easy. They want it fast. They want transfers to happen quickly, and they want peace of mind. Peace of mind is related to the idea that you can talk to someone, but it is not actually "I want someone to hold my hand in a downturn." Rather, it is more like "I want to know that my financial adviser is on my side."

So Betterment is a fiduciary, so we work only for our customers. We only work in their best interest, and we always have. Charles Schwab can't say that. Schwab is a brokerage firm selling you a product. Vanguard can't say that. Vanguard is a mutual-fund supermarket. They do not care if you maximize your money because that's not their goal. That's not their objective function. Their objective function is to sell funds.

The old way doesn't really think about what is in the customer's best interest. So it is hard to get peace of mind that you are getting what is best for your money if that's not their goal.

Editor's note: We reached out to Vanguard and Charles Schwab to respond to Stein's comments.

  • Charles Schwab said: "Jon is wrong about his fiduciary point. All of Schwab's advisory services, including our roboadvisory service, Schwab Intelligent Portfolios, are fiduciary, which means we put our clients' interests first when giving advice."
  • Vanguard said: "As the industry's only client-owned asset manager, Vanguard is not only structured to serve our clients' best interest, but guided by the noble premise that an investment company should exist to make money for our clients — not from our clients."

Chaparro: What is your target demographic?

Stein: We look at our target customer as someone who is 35 to 55 years old with $100,000 to $2 million of investable assets. But we are open to everyone. We get a lot of people with less than that because we have no minimum balance. The folks with $10 million plus are well-served by private wealth managers and family offices. The folks in the $2 million to $10 million range are decently served. But people with less than that are just getting ripped off, and not getting a lot for the financial advice they pay for. So that's the market we serve best.

Chaparro: UBS put out a note last week about how the millennial generation is about to benefit from "one of the largest intergenerational wealth transfers in history." Do you view this as a tailwind for Betterment?

Stein: Definitely. I think every 30 or 40 years, historically, in this industry, there has been a new wave of technological change or regulatory change that brings about a new crop of firms that grow to be significant players in the space. I think the last time we saw this was with the growth of Vanguard and Schwab, which were both born in the 1970s. And it took them a long time to get scale. Probably about two decades.

We think we can accelerate that, and we are already growing faster than they did in the early days. We are also growing faster than mutual funds did in their early days, and we are growing faster than ETFs in their early days.

millennials festival friends funJason Kempin / Staff / Getty Images

Chaparro: Why has that been possible?

Stein: With Betterment, it is obvious why you should switch from the old way. We do things for you that the other firms do not. For starters, we make you more money — more take-home returns than you can get anywhere else. That is the value that we provide.

The headwind to growth is that people hate to talk about finance. And there is a lot of inertia as a result. People feel like "I am probably not getting the most out of my money." They have doubts and are not confident in their money management, but they think that everything else is equally bad — everything is the same, essentially.

Our job is to open people's eyes that Betterment represents a generation shift — that it is a different way of thinking about your money and what it can do for you. We're not looking to tell people that they've been doing the wrong thing for the past 30 years, because they haven't. This didn't exist before. But now that it does, and they have to take advantage of it.

Chaparro: When we think about what matters to millennials, the things that come to mind are transparency, customer service, and performance. How does Betterment stack up on those fronts?

10000th Customer Group 2BettermentStein: On every point, we win.

On performance, we do more to personalize the portfolio to meet your actual needs than anyone else. And that helps improve performance. We help improve your take-home returns through tax-loss harvesting, through dividend shielding, through intelligent rebalancing and other intelligent software.

On the theme of convenience, I'll call it — customer service, as you mentioned, is a part of that. That's a big piece. Being accessible and being able to answer questions is an integral component. But convenience also includes other things, such as having faster money movements and a faster sign-up process, and making it easier for customers to add beneficiaries to their account. We are better at all of those things. And that translates into a much better customer experience. I think we are much higher than the average. We are tied with Vanguard's levels of customer satisfaction.

And on transparency, that ties into our pillar of making sure our clients have peace of mind. Peace of mind is driven by, yes, understanding what you own and understanding how the service works. Having that level of comfort is very important. And we are very clear on all of that. But I also think peace of mind comes from knowing that your financial provider is working in your best interest. We are doing that in a way that others are not.

Chaparro: Morgan Stanley put out a big note on the future of fintech back in May in which they argued that "only a handful of roboadvice startups will survive." Those that don't survive will consolidate or be bought up by legacy firms. Do you think this is how things will play out?

Stein: It's the way things have gone in every other industry and during every other cycle in this industry. So I expect that is right. That doesn't mean there aren't going to be new ideas coming out and new competitors emerging for decades to come.

But we have to ask ourselves: How many of these players can actually make it to scale? In financial services, it is not many. How many big financial services brands have broken out in the last three decades? It is very few. What's the brand-new bank that has come along? There's none. What's the new investing firm that has broken out and taken a lot of share? There are a couple that I probably know of, but they're not on the public's radar. Maybe like Financial Engine or DFA.

There are a couple of firms that have gotten big, but they're not a huge name. PayPal did it. Capital One did it. But it's few. So I agree with their thesis: Few will survive, and there will be consolidation.

Bezos Amazon Ted S. Warren/APChaparro: Incumbents have had their own robo offerings for years, and they have their big brand and infrastructure to back them up. What makes you so certain Betterment can survive up against such competition?

Stein: For the same reason why we often see those few innovators break out.

You could also ask "Why did Amazon break out and become the dominant online retailer?" — some would say dominant retailer period. And why wasn't it Barnes and Nobles, Target, or Walmart, or anybody else? It is because Amazon has a specific focus. They didn't have conflicts with a set of existing infrastructure and systems and people who were built around doing things the old way.

Morgan Stanley, for instance, is a firm set up to serve clients the old way. As a result, they are having a really hard time shifting to this new paradigm of pure customer alignment because that's not their model. Their model is brokerage alignment. It is a brokerage model. They are there to sell you a product, whatever product makes them the most money. That tends to be the one that they favor.

The DOL's fiduciary rule, which is now partially enacted, tries to eliminate those conflicts of interest under retirement accounts. We think every account should have an adviser that is aligned with customer interest. We think that is the future of the industry.

Editor's note: Morgan Stanley declined to comment on Stein's comments. The Wall Street giant has taken many notable steps to digitize its wealth-management offerings. As Business Insider's Matt Turner reported, the bank is planning to roll out a goals-based roboadviser option for the children of existing wealthy clients and for Morgan Stanley stock-plan participants.

Chaparro: Naturally, there are a lot of folks in wealth management and financial services who don't agree with the DOL's rule. How do you respond to folks who argue that it's bad for clients because it limits choice?

Stein: I think the industry will say and do anything it can to hang on to the old way. No one argues with the idea that about $20 billion will flow from financial industry profits to client wallets if the rule is enacted. Parties on both sides agree with that annual estimate. So is that a good thing? If you're on our side, then it is.

TechCrunchDisruptSummer2010 JS01Betterment

Chaparro: Is this model part of the reason why you left Wall Street?

Stein: I left Wall Street because I wasn't fulfilled with the idea that I could have a career by just helping banks sell more product and helping banks make more money. I wanted to be able to get closer to the customer and to build something that mattered, that made a difference in the world, that really changed the game. And I saw a bunch of opportunities to do that.

The most glaring one was investment management, where there had been no innovation from a customer perspective in decades, in my opinion. Maybe there had been innovation on the back end for the affluent. But for the mass-market customers, the side we tend to serve, there had been very limited improvement. And so much technological change has occurred.

I mentioned this idea that advice is core. That is an important part of our vision. If you believe in technology as much as we do, you then believe, for instance, that someday we will have self-driving cars. It is not a controversial thing to say that will probably happen. I think it is controversial, relatively, today that someday we will have self-managing wallets. You earn some money, and you have some preferences about how you want it saved and spent, and I believe your wallet will manage and optimize itself. You will have the right amount going into the right accounts, the right amount set aside for different needs. You can always change. Just like with a self-driving car, you can change your destination.

But all that optimization is happening for you, in a way that's aligning with your best interests. And as an adviser, we can build that future. A broker can't build that because that's not their core. A mutual-fund company can't do that. I think we are best positioned to be the financial-services firm of the future because we started with this vision of advice.

Chaparro: What's the next innovation you are excited about?

hbz 80s fashion 1986 gettyimages 499296983Harpers BazaarStein: As far as future innovation is considered, I think we can stand out the most in personalization. We want to do more and more to give you a personalized index.

The idea that you should buy a fund with 5 million other people who are buying that fund, that is a very 1980s view of the world. Why? Because that's the only technology we could support at the time. Building indexes was hard and took a lot of math.

We can do so much better than that now. I can build you an index that takes into consideration your risk tolerance, your goals, your values and personal preferences about what kind of companies you want to invest in, and any changes that come up in your life. We can build you this separately managed index fund that will yield a higher performance. I think that's a very exciting lane.

Chaparro: As part of your strategy to target younger folks, I imagine you guys are constantly advertising on podcasts. Shifting gears a bit, do you listen to podcasts?

Stein: I do. I was driving over the weekend, and I just heard one of our ads. This weekend I was listening to "Reply All," "99% Invisible," and "StartUp." I listen to a lot of them.

Chaparro: What other hobbies do you have?

Stein: We have a garden on our deck. We've got tomatoes, cherries, strawberries, squash. In past years, we've had okra.

Chaparro: How did you get into gardening?

Stein: Also, I'm a big student of happiness and figuring out what makes us happy. Part of the reason why I started this company is I think having purpose and doing something with purpose is one of the key drivers of happiness — much more so than financial gain or money.

More money doesn't really make people happier. Having purpose and having peace of mind about your money makes us happy. Gardening is one of those things that is well-correlated with happiness. I just like the idea of it.

NOW WATCH: Harvard Business School professor explains the most important problem we have in finance today and how to fix it


          Why our obsession with disaster films reveals something positive about humanity   

twister oklahoma"Twister"/Warner Bros.

Every blockbuster wants to destroy the world. We explore where that impulse comes from.

Human beings are funny creatures. Summer after summer, year after year, we fork over countless dollars to catch the latest iteration of an ancient story: the sky is falling; the Earth is dying; bring on the end of the world. It’s the season of the disaster film.

Of course, all fiction thrives on conflict and calamity, in part because storytelling allows us to live out our nightmares without cost or consequence. But there’s something undeniably odd about the impulse toward apocalypse that characterizes so much of our popular cinema. We should expect alien visitors, were they not so frequently featured in such films, to be deeply puzzled at this peculiar human ritual.

The oddity is compounded by the fact that, in recent years, the trappings of the disaster film have overtaken other genres as well. None of this summer’s major blockbusters is a disaster film in the classical sense, but The Mummy, Wonder Woman, War for the Planet of the Apes, and Transformers: The Last Knight all feature collapsing buildings and existential stakes.

Wonder WomanWarner Bros. PicturesIt often seems that, against the backdrop of the 24-hour news cycle, only extinction events feel consequential enough to propel blockbuster drama. Exceptions exist, of course, including James Mangold’s admirably humble Logan and Christopher Nolan’s Gotham-centric Dark Knight trilogy. But for the most part, a blockbuster that doesn’t put the world on the line is no blockbuster at all.

Certain obvious explanations for this trend present themselves. The imperatives of the international box office drive all big-budget films toward bigger, clearer narratives, and it’s easy to see why a global threat might have broader appeal than a provincial one. The subtleties of language and gesture that make up a small-scale drama are far harder to translate than a meteor demolishing a skyscraper.

Plus there’s the fact that disaster spectacles remain, for the time being, unique to the big screen. Promise to level an entire city and fewer viewers will want to wait for the streaming release.

But in our rush to turn every conceivable conflict into a colossal one, we’ve forgotten what disaster films, at their best, can offer. The purpose of the disaster film is not to make small conflicts bigger but to make big ones smaller – to reduce unthinkable catastrophes to a human scale.

Our indifference to genocides and natural disasters the world over suggests that we are poorly equipped to care about massive tragedies. It is only when these tragedies are expressed through individuals that we are able to empathize. We don’t care about the people because of the disaster; we care about the disaster because of the people.

Andrei Tarkovsky once wrote that the meaning of cinema was “relating a person to the whole world.” And though it’s difficult to imagine Tarkovsky lining up for a Roland Emmerich film, his aphorism describes the potential toward which great disaster films can aspire.

For all the ethical abandon with which some disaster films kill off their characters, the perspective they can afford is accurate. Most of the dramas we tend to care about are, in the scheme of things, insignificant – and so they would seem, were we faced with impending doom. We are apes on a rock tearing through a void. It’s about time we stuck together.

Twister

twister oklahoma"Twister"/Warner Bros.

Widely maligned by critics upon its release, Twister holds a special place in the heart of many a millennial, thanks in part to the popular ride at Universal Studios. The film’s plot is laughable on its face: a retired storm-chaser returns home to get his divorce papers signed, only to be wrapped up in a quest to study an F5 tornado.

Silly though it may sound, the film is executed with such flare and infectious enthusiasm that it’s difficult not to get swept up (pun intended). Led by the charming Bill Paxton and the always-stellar Helen Hunt, with supporting performances by Philip Seymour Hoffman and Cary Elwes, the film transcends its hokey storyline to become a first-rate entertainment.

The Core

There’s a profound satisfaction to be found in loving a film that others find ridiculous. I have loved many such films — The Village, Across the Universe, Airheads – but none of my favorites is so broadly hated as The Core. The film, which concerns a ragtag team’s attempt to restore the spinning of the earth’s core, could easily be relabeled “generic disaster movie.” Its trailer is full of lines like “everybody’s dead in a year” and “we killed the planet.”

Aaron Eckhart stars in a role that failed to establish him as a leading man, but he admirably holds together a cast that includes Hilary Swank and Stanley Tucci. At the very least, The Core is instructive for laying the conventions of its genre so blatantly bare. 

The Day After Tomorrow

the day after tomorrow 20th Century Fox20th Century Fox

Disaster films nearly always contain some not-so-subtle commentary on our mistreatment of the environment, but this one was so topical upon its release that it could have been shown as a double-feature with An Inconvenient Truth. Directed by disaster filmmaker extraordinaire Roland Emmerich, The Day After Tomorrow tells the story of a paleoclimatologist played by Jake Gyllenhaal who’s forced to lead a group of survivors when a superstorm floods, then freezes, New York City.

It is a hamfisted cautionary tale about global warming (which, via the film’s scientific hand-waving, produces an ice age), but it also functions as a powerful 9/11 allegory, celebrating the ability of New Yorkers to unify in the face of tragedy.

Independence Day

Independence Day set the stage for the modern disaster film, lending new levels of visual spectacle (the film picked up an Oscar for visual effects) and global appeal to the genre. There is something refreshing about the film’s eschewal of any subtlety in its treatment of alien invasion: they’re here to kill us, we’re told, so we have to kill them first.

It is in reaction to a film like Independence Day, which features a mad-dog Randy Quaid blowing up an alien ship kamikaze-style, that a film like Arrival gets made, which features a somber Amy Adams writing messages on a whiteboard. I, for one, am glad that the cinematic ecosystem can bear both.

Armageddon

ArmageddonWalt Disney Studios

No list of disaster films would be complete without some Bayhem. Armageddon, like The Core, is positively ludicrous from a narrative perspective: a group of oil-drillers are sent to space to stop an asteroid from destroying the planet.

But as an exercise in style and genre, the film stands up – if only because Michael Bay’s shameless, sweeping, dynamic style has been so influential in Hollywood since. Even the Criterion Collection, those great arbiters of cinematic taste and distinction, saw fit to recognize the film with a laserdisc. Perhaps in fifty years time, we’ll be reevaluating Bay’s work the way French critics reevaluated Hitchcock. That is, if an asteroid doesn’t wipe us out first.

NOW WATCH: A Navy SEAL explains what to do if you're attacked by a dog


          America is hooked on credit cards — and it's pretty clear why (JPM, TSYS)   

shoppingShutterstock/Adam Supawadee

Americans have racked up $1.01 trillion in revolving debt — primarily credit card debt — according to the Federal Reserve. That's the highest tally since the financial crisis in 2008. 

The credit card is now the preferred method of payment among Americans, edging out debit cards and cash, according to the 2016 US Payment Study by payment processing company Total Systems Services, or TSYS.

It's the first time credit cards claimed the top spot in the six years TSYS has been conducting the study, which surveys 1,000 consumers who hold at least one debt card and one credit card (you can read more about their methodology on page four of the study).

Why have credit cards grown more popular? The study offers some insights as to why: 

Forty percent of respondents from the TSYS study picked credit cards as their favorite form of payment, followed by debit cards (35%), and cash (11%). Credit cards have been gaining on debit cards for several years now.

Samantha Lee/Business Insider; TSYS

TSYS found that credit cards aren't universally loved, currying the most favor from older millennials.

Samantha Lee/Business Insider; TSYS

Credit card love also skewed toward high-income households. The more money a household earns, the more they prefer credit cards.

Samantha Lee/Business Insider; TSYS


See the rest of the story at Business Insider
          Millennials are flocking towards some of the most speculative ways to invest   

Magician trading floorReuters/Kai Pfaffenbach

Millennials are big users of some of the most speculative investing instruments in the stock market, according to TD Ameritrade.

The brokerage firm told Business Insider that the roughly 18-35-year-old demographic made up about 40% of its new customers. Almost half of their trades came from mobile devices, said Victor Jones, the director of trading at TD Ameritrade. 

"Trades from mobile tend to be more futures-based," Jones said. "More people are gravitating towards derivatives like options and futures." 

"When you have your phone on you, you're available to look at the markets 24/7, but the markets aren't open 24/7," Jones said. "Futures give millennials or any investor the opportunity to participate in the market 24/7."

Instead of buying a specific asset class like a company's stock or a currency, futures and options contracts allow traders to profit from their bets on future prices and to hedge losses on what they already own.

Jones doesn't see mobile trading as the reason why more people are moving towards derivatives that aren't tied to the 9:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. ET stock-market schedule.

More investors — millennial and older — understand they can use these instruments to manage portfolio risks, Jones said. Derivatives trading made up about 45% of TD Ameritrade's transactions, he said, up from about 10% in 2009.

"They're gravitating towards the trading strategies that can help them limit their risk, limit their capital exposure, and generate additional yield on the portfolio," Jones said. 

Coincidentally, Interactive Brokers had captured this in a TV commercial in which a woman interrupts her dinner with a man to "do some hedging trades" on her phone because global markets are crashing after Russia downed a NATO plane.  

Even as derivatives trading may demonstrate a certain sophistication among millennial traders, it could also reflect their outsized stomach for risk, since they have a longer runway to earn returns from the market. A TD Ameritrade spokesperson said the most popular options strategies included covered calls, through which a trader can hedge on a long position in an asset. The options education page was consistently among the firm's top-five most visited, she added.

"I agree that derivatives do have unique risk characteristics," Jones said. "We are passionate about ensuring that our clients are aware of the unique risk characteristics."

NOW WATCH: An economist explains the key issues that Trump needs to address to boost the economy


          John Saward – July 03, 2017 at 10:47AM   
I notice there is no provision in Australian immigration law for soul-mate reunion. This does need addressing by the post-millennial spiritually cognisant enlightened generations. Imported from Facebook via IFTTT
          No, the Hipster Barista Does Not Represent Millennials   
American Greatness, by Brandon J. Weichert Posted By: earlybird- Sun, 02 59 2017 08:59:17 GMT Have you seen that “hipster barista” meme floating around the Internet? How many of you have scoffed at the Millennial generation for being a bunch of “snowflakes”? Or sneered at Generation Z (those born from 1996 onward) for their zombie'like passivity? We’ve all been there. Whether you’re a Baby Boomer or even a Right'wing Millennial like me, we’ve all mocked the childish, liberal image of the Millennials and the generation succeeding them. But, looking at the four generations of American that have been born since the end of World War II, you begin to understand that the Millennials are increasingly conservative.
          Comment on Dispelling the 80 Percent Myth of Declining Churches by David Hartman   
Thom, I'm excited about this new study. Thanks for keeping us on the cutting edge of ministry and evangelism. I have devoured most of your research-based books over the years. I got a DMin degree back in 2007 on matching the Witnessing Styles with the Faith Stages for maximum evangelistic impact. Your work in the Unchurched Next Door was invaluable to my project. I am currently writing a practical witnessing book on the same subject, and wonder if you have any updated info on the characteristics of the five Faith Stages (the U5-U1). I assume some of those characteristics have changed in the past 15-16 years since you conducted the original study (2001-2001). For instance, it seems like the Millennials and Z Generation and the Nones are leaning more U-5 in our ever-increasing secularized and Post-Christian culture. Any help would be appreciated. I want to modify these characteristics in my book and of course cite your work. Please use my email for any response. God bless you!
          El futuro ... y el presente es de los mayores de 50 años   

  • Los FaB (fifty and beyond) españoles se desmarcan de los estereotipos y cánones sociales de los “seniors” de las últimas décadas
  • Se consolidan como uno de los perfiles más relevantes desde el punto de vista económico y de consumo: uno de los grupos de edad con mayor poder adquisitivo, liberados de obligaciones y con más tiempo libre
  • No se avergüenzan de su edad, se aceptan tal cual son, orgullosos de haber llegado hasta donde han llegado, a la vez son conscientes de sus limitaciones
  • La salud, su talón de Aquiles: tienen una actitud muy proactiva hacia la salud, y la prevención es un objetivo en sí mismo, donde están dispuestos a invertir tiempo y dinero
  • La nutrición y el ejercicio físico juegan un papel fundamental en su vida: destacar su afición al running y su interés por productos naturales

“Ni en Benidorm, ni cuidando a sus nietos, ni viviendo una segunda juventud. Los FaB (fifty and beyond) se consolidan como uno de los grupos de edad más atractivos para el sector de gran consumo, fuera de clichés” según se desprende del estudio “El Futuro es FaB” realizado por IPSOS.

En él, IPSOS ha querido conocer en profundidad el nuevo perfil de los FaB (mayores de 50 años): ¿qué les define?, ¿qué les preocupa?, ¿cuáles son sus aspiraciones? y por supuesto, ¿cómo es su experiencia con las marcas?. Un target que nada tiene que ver con el concepto que tradicionalmente tenemos de los mayores de 50 años, y que por su poder adquisitivo es, junto con los Millennials, muy atractivo.

Madrid, junio de 2017

Más...

          Comment on Short PSA: The Sweet Smell of Success by Lex   
1. [Millennial Collective]: "Keep your mores out of our pore-es." 2. "Shower. Every day." Preferably in the morning. (Night showering is a dirty lie; and sleeping in your next-day's socks and underwear isn't some Sam Hinkie-esq wunderkind lifehack. Or maybe it is.) And *always* after the gym, you weird little prudes. (Not showering after gym class being one of the weirder generational divides.) And, no, swimming doesn't count as showering. Note: The showering process isn't complete until you've used a *clean* towel or blow dryer to completely dry, your armpits, buttocks, groin, and feet in particular. 3. Related: Wear clean clothes.+ Every day. I can't stress this enough. Yes, you paid $400 for those jeans. Yes, machine washing/drying will break down the denim — just not as much as will the accumulating personal and environmental grime you're letting to fester over months. Stop freezing them. Handwash if you must. The only non-outerwear clothing that should go 6 months without cleaning is a suit.++ 4. Body sprays/powders in lieu of showering are the equivalent of Fabreezing your garbage instead of taking it out. Also, I have no idea why anyone would want to "smell like a stripper," but stop slathering yourself with fragrance mixed with baby oil. Also: If more than one or two people ask you what you're wearing, you've put too much on. 5. SHG missed the chance to speak to the millennial zeitgeist: Smells are instant and the most physically and emotionally triggering environmental cues. (See Proust.) For those with the sort of bionic olfactory sensitivity to know if someone 10 feet away had a bit of garlic the day before, the confection of bacteria festering on your hair, feet, groin, anus, and armpits for three days is Hell. #WorstSuperPowerEver. +Note: That detergent/softener fill line on your washer? Yeah, extra detergent =/= super clean/softer: It equals undissolved goo that traps even more bacteria, dirt, skin cells, body oil, etc. ++Of which decent people should own many; and which ought be carefully pressed before being appropriate hung, preferably in a cedar closet, on the correct hanger after being worn.
          Collective Soul gives Gen X a good time at the Big Gig   
The chatter around town about Summerfest's bookings this year is that the lineup was geared towards drawing Millennials. Collective Soul's appearance at the Big Backyard, however, was a call out to the GenXers - and they responded.
          Here's How Millennials Can Save Money on Food This Summer   

Here's How Millennials Can Save Money on Food This SummerThis article, Here's How Millennials Can Save Money on Food This Summer, originally appeared on Chowhound. Summer usually means more freedom for millennials: free from stress, studying, and for some, even working. A study by Bankrate.com found that the average millennial eats out five times a week — a habit that’s killing their savings accounts.



          What I learnt from first-time solo travelling at 44   
OPINION: I am deeply resentful of the way millennials travel. I was 25 before I even left the country. I never had a gap year working in a pub in London, getting fat on lager and curries. Nor did I backpack around the world, meeting handsome and slightly dangerous men named Carlos or Sven. 
          Move over Minecraft: Monetising new wave of user generated content! - by Om Tandon   
2017, What does the future and success of UGC games looks like? A deep look at UX of 4 games that leverage the power of user generated content, empowering users to create content for monetisation, disrupting the way millennials consume stories and fiction
          Millennials : les antisoixante-huitards   
Conservateurs en apparence, les Millennials se révèlent, à travers l'étude La Chose-BVA, critiques envers les politiques et circonspects avec les marques.
          One-Level Living is at an All-Time High   

Boomers, Gen X, and Millennials alike are all looking to spend less time tending to their homes. A survey by The American Institute of Architects (AIA) finds an increasing demand for single-level home designs. One-level homes provide greater accessibility and are generally more cost-effective and less maintenance—benefits that appeal to busy people of all ages. ...

The post One-Level Living is at an All-Time High appeared first on Maronda Homes Blog.


          Comment on Trump being Trump by JS   
A lot more millennial proles voted for Bernie than Trump. Many of them are young proles from reddy states. <I>"Young people, ages 17-29, continue to vote in high numbers during the 2016 primaries and caucuses. In Republican contests, youth have broken participation records in nearly every state for which we have data, while in Democratic primaries overwhelming youth support for Senator Bernie Sanders helped him launch a serious challenge to Hillary Clinton. As Secretary Clinton and Donald Trump solidify their status as the front-runners, we thought it would be informative to visualize how young people have voted so far across all primaries and caucuses.</I> <i>The graph below shows the cumulative total of youth who have voted for each remaining candidate in the 2016 primary season. The graph only includes states where a youth vote count could be estimated for each candidate in both parties’ contests.</i> http://civicyouth.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/04/April26CumulativeVotesGraph-1024x581.png <I>In the 20 states for which we have data, nearly 2 million young people have voted for Senator Sanders, almost three times more youth votes than any other candidate in either party. Secretary Donald Trump has received the second-largest number of youth votes, 747,000, while Secretary Clinton is close behind with 727,000. More youth have voted for Senator Sanders than for Clinton and Trump combined.</i> http://civicyouth.org/total-youth-votes-in-2016-primaries-and-caucuses/
           Teile oder stirb! Warum wir wirklich so viele unserer Daten freiwillig preisgeben    

Beinahe sorglos verschenken wir unsere Daten an Google, Facebook und Amazon. Was für viele Menschen heute noch ihrem Mitteilungsdrang dient, könnte uns bald weniger lebendig machen.

Auf Google stellt man schnell fest, dass es Unkenrufe zum Ende des Datenschutzes schon seit Jahrzehnten gibt. Aber die Lage ist heute besonders paradox.

Das Vertrauen in Unternehmen ist generell auf einem Tiefpunkt, wenn man dem 2017-Edelman-Trust-Barometer Glauben schenken darf. Eine Umfrage von KPMG fand zudem heraus, dass sich 56 Prozent  der Befragten „besorgt“ oder „sehr besorgt“ zeigten über die Art und Weise, wie Firmen mit ihren Daten umgehen. Eine jüngste PwC-Studie ergab sogar, dass 79 Prozent der Online-Nutzer weniger bereit sind als noch vor einem Jahr, ihre Daten mit anderen zu teilen.

Jedoch folgen den Worten nur selten Taten. Die freiwillige Bereitstellung von persönlichen Daten hat entgegen aller Absichtserklärungen keinen Abbruch erlitten. Das Geschäft von digitalen Datensammlern- und Auswertern wie Amazon, Google oder Facebook boomt wie nie zuvor. Digitalen Assistenten wie Alexa flüstern wir unsere persönlichsten Daten nun sogar direkt ins Ohr. Warum?

3 Gründe, die auf der Hand liegen

Zum einen ist es unsere pure Ignoranz als Verbraucher. Viele von uns wissen einfach nicht, was mit unseren Daten geschieht, dass wir zum Beispiel Facebook das Recht zur übertragbaren, gebührenfreien und weltweiten Nutzung unserer persönlichen Fotos übertragen, wenn wir sie hochladen.

Zum anderen neigen wir, wie ja auch das Beispiel Klimawandel zeigt, zu kurzfristigem Denken und blenden die langfristigen Konsequenzen unseres Handelns aus. Da uns der Wert der oft als Interaktion getarnten Transaktion nicht unmittelbar bewusst ist, willigen wir wegen des augenblicklichen Nutzens oft allzu schnell ein. Die Folgen unserer impulsiven Online-Entscheidungen bleiben uns lange oder oft auch komplett verborgen.

Schließlich ist der Umgang mit unseren persönlichen Daten natürlich auch von den Werten verschiedener Generationen geprägt. Für Digital Natives wie zum Beispiel die Mitglieder der Millennials-Nachfolger Generation Z (geboren zwischen 1995 und 2015) ist es normal, ihre Daten freiwillig anzubieten. Sie sind damit aufgewachsen und nichts anderes gewohnt. Studien belegen, dass sie deswegen ihre sozialen Profile aber eben auch entsprechend bewusster managen und mit größerer Selbstverständlichkeit zwischen ihren diversen digitalen Identitäten wandeln.

Sehnsucht nach Unsterblichkeit

Unwissenheit, kognitive Muster und verschiedene Werte verschiedener Generationen – all dies sind einleuchtende rationale Erklärungen. Die eigentliche Triebfeder für unseren Datenteilungsdrang ist dennoch eine anderere: der Wunsch, uns durch das Datenteilen mitzuteilen. Dahinter steckt die Sehnsucht, Spuren zu hinterlassen, eine digitale Geschichte unseres Lebens, die uns überdauert und unsere persönlichen Daten unter Umständen sogar zu einem größeren algorithmischen Netz zusammenwebt. Im Grunde geht es dabei um den Evergreen unter den menschlichen Grundbedürfnissen: unseren Wunsch nach Unsterblichkeit.

Ob Quantified-Self-Apps, die unser Verhalten quantifizieren, um es zu optimieren, Life-Logging (also die kontinuierliche digitale Aufzeichnung des eigenen Lebens), oder ein Service wie Ghost Writer, der „algorithmische Autobiographien“ erstellt: Das freiwillige Teilen unserer persönlichen Daten entspringt unserer Sehnsucht danach, einen Feedback-Beweis zu haben für die eigene Existenz. Daten sind unsere Lebenszeichen. Data ergo sum.

Wir ahnen, dass wir wohl keine Wahl haben. Natürlich könnten wir uns entscheiden, ein völlig analoges Leben zu führen und uns der digitalen Gesellschaft zu entziehen. Dies kann allerdings in der sozialen Isolation enden und auch Karrierechancen mindern. Unsere Identitäten sind nunmal inzwischen zu einem Großteil digital.

„Digiphrenie“ in der Grauzone

Unser Datenmitteilungsdrang ist ein unersättliches Monster, das keine moderaten Haltungen zulässt. Entweder wir koppeln uns komplett ab vom digitalen Datenstrom oder wir springen voll hinein. Denn teilen wir erst einmal Daten, dann wollen wir auch ein möglichst komplettes Selbst projezieren, und je mehr Daten wir teilen, desto vollständiger wird dieses öffentliche Bild von uns. Zum einen atomisieren soziale Medien unsere Identität – der Autor Douglas Rushkoff nennt das „Digiphrenie“. Zum anderen sind sie eben genau die Kanäle, um die Einheit, unsere Identität, wiederherzustellen: indem wir noch mehr teilen. Wenn schon „Matrix,“ dann bitte voll und ganz mit uns!

Allerdings sind wir nun vernetzter und kommunikativer als je zuvor, und doch einsamer und sozial isolierter. Vielen von uns fehlt echte menschliche Bindung, und Experten beklagen eine Krise der Freundschaft in unseren westlichen Gesellschaften. Die Rückzugsräume für Intimität werden knapper, und Privatsphäre gilt zwar als heilig, ist aber vor allem ein rechtliches Konstrukt, das sich in der digitalen Realität kaum noch durchsetzen lässt. Ganz anders war die Wahrnehmung im alten Athen. Dort galt Privatheit als unsozial: Die Teilnahme an der Polis, am öffentlichen Leben, qualifizierte einen als Bürger.

Das Problem scheint heutzutage darin zu bestehen, dass wir weder richtig öffentlich, noch jemals mehr richtig privat sind. Stattdessen weilen wir in einer Grauzone, in der wir uns entweder in Pseudo-Öffentlichkeiten exponieren, ohne tatsächlich aktiv am gesellschaftlichen Diskurs teilzunehmen. Auf der anderen Seite können wir uns eben auch nie ganz von den digitalen Foren lossagen. Alleinsein ist gesellschaftlich, praktisch und moralisch unmöglich.

Es bleibt festzuhalten:

  • Die Angst, unsere Identität zu schwächen, ist größer als die Angst vor der digitalen Ausbeutung.
  • Die Sehnsucht nach Anerkennung ist stärker als das Bedürfnis nach Privatheit.
  • Die Sehnsucht nach einer Datenbiografie, einem digitalen Vermächtnis, das uns überdauert, ist größer als der Wunsch unser Leben kontrollieren zu können.

Die Zukunft gehört exponentiellen Identitäten

Diese Dynamiken werden durch das Internet of Things noch einmal exponentiell zunehmen. Schon bald soll es mehr zwischenmaschinelle als zwischenmenschliche Kommunikation geben. 20 Milliarden Geräte werden bis 2020 mit dem Internet verbunden sein, sagt Analystenfirma Gartner.

Somit wird das Internet of Things zwangsläufig auch zum Internet of People. Dinge werden zu Käufern, Kunden und Personen werden, Daten produzieren und eigene Identitäten annehmen. Umgekehrt mutieren wir selber immer mehr zu Dingen, objektiviert und auf Datensätze reduziert. Wer glaubt, dass unsere digitalen Aktivitäten heute schon einen Großteil unserer Identität ausmachen, well, you ain‘t seen nothing yet.

All dies bedeutet, dass wir uns von einer Knowledge- zu einer Identity-Economy bewegen, in der eine Vielzahl an parallelen Identitäten kultiviert, expandiert, gemanagt und gehandelt werden. Digitale Plattformen, die Zugriff auf hunderte Millionen solcher Identitäten haben und als deren Marktplätze fungieren, werden weiterhin zu den Gewinnern zählen, aber auch Anbieter von spezialisierten Identity-Management-Lösungen.

„Mehr als eine Identität zu haben ist ein Zeichen mangelnder Integrität“ – so hat das Mark Zuckerberg einmal formuliert. Gegen diese Haltung gilt es anzukämpfen. Unsere digiten Menschenrechte fußen auf einem zentralen Prinzip: mehr als nur ein Datensatz zu sein. Ob es unser Facebook-Graph ist oder unser Profil bei anderen digitalen Plattformen, wir dürfen es nie zulassen, auf nur eine Identität reduziert werden. Wir müssen den Raum und die Mittel haben, um unsere digitalen Identitäten selber ständig erweitern und kontrollieren zu können.

Dabei helfen offene Plattformen wie Respect Network, Citizenme, Mydex oder Jolocom, die Qiy Foundation, die es Nutzern ermöglicht, ihre Datenpakete an den meistbietenden zu verkaufen, oder natürlich auch die Bitcoin-Technologie Blockchain, die verspricht den Mittelsmann ganz auszuschalten und Datenaustausch Peer-to-Peer zu regeln.

Fest steht: Wir werden auch in Zukunft weiter freiwillig und fleißig unsere Daten teilen, um uns unsterblich machen zu wollen. Aber ohne die Freiheit, mehrere, unter Umständen auch widersprüchliche Identitäten zu unterhalten und verschiedene digitale Leben zu führen, werden wir uns immer weniger lebendig fühlen.

Mehr zum Thema: 


          The DitchRider's blog post was featured   
The DitchRider's blog post was featured

Sunday Poetry: Kristian Macaron

OK, so Kristian is a Facebook friend. We did meet somewhere, but my memory fails me. She is published by Swimming with Elephants, and her wandering poems are epic cataclysms of molten explosions, star twists and extravaganzas. She's quite persistent on the topic that minimizes our personal angst into mere specks, blips on the eyeballs of galaxies. Wanderer I’ve been trying to figure out the way the world was built.The way tectonics equal breath—In that same way moments ofnebulae and volcanoes passamong us into some elemental ocean—as even as moments of picking upstarfish in the surf, as sifting throughstones in mountains. Pangea, Rodinia, Laurasia, Atlantis are names of infinite movement andonce they’ve released their seismic shudders the plates mantle-warmbreathe Jade—tectonic scarring—silty snake green and ocean veined.Once a stranger told me that the Grand Canyon grows one centimetereach year—or crumbles—and that part of Guatemala is in California, and he’s probablywrong, but “I know the world is moving,” he says and tells methe snowy plateau of the Rockiesis part of the Pacific subterraneanwhich forced herself up through the crustto become a continental core. I’ve stood in Chaco canyon under the many-armed paintednova spinning in the shadow of a blinding sun.Once the bed of a millennial ocean,epicontinental from the Arctic to the Mexican Gulf—the dirt roads that pass through here connectedthe home of a millennial people.Supernova light—once an outstretched sudden flame—already past and already dimming. A planet is a wanderer, a wonderer.Now that years occur to me as space, I realize thatmost seconds I am not aware of where you areon this Earth, in this stitched river of novas,this bed of planets. I’ve been trying to figure out the way the world was built.The ground is as old as Creation.Earth, we call her, earth: stone, dirt, ash, dust.Before the mountains there were oceans.Before oceans, a surface, and underneath:a molten heart, pulsing—to set the beat of ours— in bursts. Suddenly earth— suddenly starfish— suddenly breath—suddenly stars—The first cartographs are mountains pressed with seashells—tattoos older than language.The words of the Creator are these mountains—dry ridges of deep ocean, pressed by atmosphere.We are here with no compass, but how we choose todraw our breath, soundless;plant our steps, mercurial. A star can live for a million years and collapse in secondsso heavy it suffocates into its own gravity.All brightness, and suddenly neutrinos sculpting glow.From the surging remnant sings a radiant heartbeat—a beacon so fiercely alive it pulses through lightyears— The astronomers say that we hold comet debris in our bodies andin that in four billion years our dust will meet Andromeda,churning molecular pendula, falling into some new world—or perhaps into the roiling chaos of star birth. I’ve been trying to imagine how the world was built.And when she stopped making herself to be formed by hands—bone brittle soft blood hands—what it is she seeks from us whenshe is already madeof limestoneof lava. *When We Dream of Those Blue Fires what it says about us, thatour children are raised on fairy tales,that we obsess about wonder—no,what it says about them, that theyform in such myth, and we expectthem—we expect ourselves—to be real. A myth is meant to vanish, and when it does— There is a place in the world where the volcano spills blue, but not-firesome kind of wonder like fairy light, and it builds and burns and it flickersfrom a far off mountain, some island, some where, some real andfor a while, pictures of cerulean blaze brim over—capture. This electric indigo isflame is wonder. Before, we don’t even think of the explanation and —we are in the moments after, I want you to know that I am not ignoring the way the world is burning.I am not ignoring how this waterfall is not water falling is not blue fire is not wishbecause after is always now always moving in the moments we realize how truly we were raised on brimstone.*Alpenglow His voice doesn’t bring her stories of cloudsanymore or echoes of how electricitymakes the faraway cities mimicstars in their humming flickers of wire.She takes this evenly, like farming ashes in a campfire,like one cup of coffee at a time,like one drive to work in the morningand one drive home in the evening,one closing of a book.Like one sun setting or alpenglow—the sun’s paint on the mountains at twilight. It’s then she remembers what they sayabout mountain menis that they often learn to movewithout feet: Never knowing howto tread a ground meant to go betweenthings or traveledhand-in-hand.Alpenglows are the colors on the mountain, after all,and while she sees thecordilleras basking in horizon,cloaked in their warm rainbow they are sinking intohis irises—like honey,like tea leaves,like dew.*Bio:Originally from Albuquerque, New Mexico, Kristian Macaron received her MFA from Emerson College in Boston, Massachusetts in 2012. She is a writer in multiple genres and enjoys the challenges of each. Storm, her first poetry chapbook, was released in 2015 from Swimming With Elephants Publications in Albuquerque, New Mexico.Her fiction has appeared in The Winter Tangerine Review volume 3, Lightning Cake Journal, and Ginosko Literary Journal; nonfiction in The Bellows American Review, and the Albuquerque Brewer's Crew Magazine. Her poetry has been published online in Philadelphia Stories, Elbow Room New Mexico, Watermelon Isotope, and Duke City Fix. She is a founding editor of the literary journals, Manzano Mountain Review and Little Wolf. Find her work here: kristianmacaron.comFor submission guidelines see the bottom paragraph in previous posts.  Sorry. mm.See More

          The CEO of an investing startup taking in $12 million a day on the future of finance, millennials, and happiness   

jon stein ceo betterment 3

It took a year for the roboadviser Betterment to reach $10 million in assets under management.

That day, in 2011, was a big one for founder Jon Stein, 37, who set up the company after working at First Manhattan Consulting Group. He recalls going out to dinner that evening and being in awe of having so many people trust him and his company with their money. Now the company pulls in $12 million a day.

Betterment is the largest independent roboadviser in the world, with $9 billion under management and 270,000 customers. Betterment is currently valued at $700 million, according to a company spokeswoman.

Betterment provides financial advice online and via a smartphone app. Rather than using human managers to build portfolios, roboadvisers like Betterment use algorithms to determine where to invest. Global assets managed by robos could reach $13 trillion by 2025 in a best-case scenario, according to a group of equity analysts at Morgan Stanley. That would be up from $100 billion in December.

Betterment's growth has been impressive, but it still faces steep competition. The wealth-management space has caught on that roboadvisers are hot, and many big firms have rolled out their own robo offerings. Charles Schwab and Vanguard are two such giants with trillions of dollars in assets under management.

Stein is resolute in his belief, however, that those firms are rooted in the old way. Business Insider recently met up with Stein at Betterment's Manhattan office to talk about the company's journey, the future of wealth management and the firm, and happiness.

This interview has been edited for clarity and length.

Frank Chaparro: How's business?

Jon Stein: We have had an incredible run. We are the largest independent online financial adviser. And this has been a goal of ours since we started the company seven years ago. We just celebrated our seventh anniversary. We have grown something like 300% year-over-year for that entire time. When we first started out, it took us a year to get to $10 million assets under management. When we did, I couldn't believe it.

It took us another six months to get to $20 million. It then took us another three months to get to $30 million. We just kept growing faster and faster and faster. And today we bring in $10 million on an average day. Our business has changed a lot, in one sense. We are growing so well, and that growth is accelerating. And our offerings are much more sophisticated than when we started.

But in another sense, we are doing the same thing we have always been doing — that is, thinking about the customer and what the customer wants, and then building financial services in a way that actually responds to customer demands, which I think is not the way the old guard has done things. The old way just sells the product. The old way has the product they want to push. Our vision is that the service should be built around the customer and it should be very personalized. It should be built for their needs. It should be very convenient and strip away unnecessary complexities, and it should give them peace of mind.

robotChaparro: In February, Betterment rolled out an offering that would provide users with access to human financial advisers. It appears that the pure robo-only model is unsustainable and that firms have to go hybrid, with a bit of old and new. Was this the thought process behind the move?

Stein: Our goal, long-term, is to be our customers' central financial relationship. We want them to be able to manage everything in one place when they come to Betterment. We give them guidance about their full financial life with that holistic view. That's what customers want. They want that ability to manage everything in one place.

And that's why we rolled out Betterment Plus and Premium. We want to be able to answer any question our clients have. We want to make it clear to everyone that people can call us and get advice and guidance on any financial question. Just call us. I don't think we've been clear enough about that even today. I think there is more work to do. And I think you will see us over the course of the year rolling out better ways that make it really obvious that anyone can get financial advice here on anything. Because we have certified financial planners who are willing to answer any question.

Chaparro: It's been said that pure roboplatforms could face trouble if there is a downturn. Without that hand-holding and someone to talk to, investors might pull —

j00322_004_237Stein: Says who? I don't think that prop really resonates with customers.

If you talk to customers and ask them, "What do you want from your financial adviser?" They don't say, "We really want someone who is going to be there for me during a downturn." That's a very industry-oriented way of thinking about justifying your value as a financial adviser. It's not really what customers care about or want. They want performance. The reason they hire us is because we maximize their money. That is core to our value.

Convenience is another. They want it easy. They want it fast. They want transfers to happen quickly, and they want peace of mind. Peace of mind is related to the idea that you can talk to someone, but it is not actually "I want someone to hold my hand in a downturn." Rather, it is more like "I want to know that my financial adviser is on my side."

So Betterment is a fiduciary, so we work only for our customers. We only work in their best interest, and we always have. Charles Schwab can't say that. Schwab is a brokerage firm selling you a product. Vanguard can't say that. Vanguard is a mutual-fund supermarket. They do not care if you maximize your money because that's not their goal. That's not their objective function. Their objective function is to sell funds.

The old way doesn't really think about what is in the customer's best interest. So it is hard to get peace of mind that you are getting what is best for your money if that's not their goal.

Editor's note: We reached out to Vanguard and Charles Schwab to respond to Stein's comments.

  • Charles Schwab said: "Jon is wrong about his fiduciary point. All of Schwab's advisory services, including our roboadvisory service, Schwab Intelligent Portfolios, are fiduciary, which means we put our clients' interests first when giving advice."
  • Vanguard said: "As the industry's only client-owned asset manager, Vanguard is not only structured to serve our clients' best interest, but guided by the noble premise that an investment company should exist to make money for our clients — not from our clients."

Chaparro: What is your target demographic?

Stein: We look at our target customer as someone who is 35 to 55 years old with $100,000 to $2 million of investable assets. But we are open to everyone. We get a lot of people with less than that because we have no minimum balance. The folks with $10 million plus are well-served by private wealth managers and family offices. The folks in the $2 million to $10 million range are decently served. But people with less than that are just getting ripped off, and not getting a lot for the financial advice they pay for. So that's the market we serve best.

Chaparro: UBS put out a note last week about how the millennial generation is about to benefit from "one of the largest intergenerational wealth transfers in history." Do you view this as a tailwind for Betterment?

Stein: Definitely. I think every 30 or 40 years, historically, in this industry, there has been a new wave of technological change or regulatory change that brings about a new crop of firms that grow to be significant players in the space. I think the last time we saw this was with the growth of Vanguard and Schwab, which were both born in the 1970s. And it took them a long time to get scale. Probably about two decades.

We think we can accelerate that, and we are already growing faster than they did in the early days. We are also growing faster than mutual funds did in their early days, and we are growing faster than ETFs in their early days.

millennials festival friends fun

Chaparro: Why has that been possible?

Stein: With Betterment, it is obvious why you should switch from the old way. We do things for you that the other firms do not. For starters, we make you more money — more take-home returns than you can get anywhere else. That is the value that we provide.

The headwind to growth is that people hate to talk about finance. And there is a lot of inertia as a result. People feel like "I am probably not getting the most out of my money." They have doubts and are not confident in their money management, but they think that everything else is equally bad — everything is the same, essentially.

Our job is to open people's eyes that Betterment represents a generation shift — that it is a different way of thinking about your money and what it can do for you. We're not looking to tell people that they've been doing the wrong thing for the past 30 years, because they haven't. This didn't exist before. But now that it does, and they have to take advantage of it.

Chaparro: When we think about what matters to millennials, the things that come to mind are transparency, customer service, and performance. How does Betterment stack up on those fronts?

10000th Customer Group 2Stein: On every point, we win.

On performance, we do more to personalize the portfolio to meet your actual needs than anyone else. And that helps improve performance. We help improve your take-home returns through tax-loss harvesting, through dividend shielding, through intelligent rebalancing and other intelligent software.

On the theme of convenience, I'll call it — customer service, as you mentioned, is a part of that. That's a big piece. Being accessible and being able to answer questions is an integral component. But convenience also includes other things, such as having faster money movements and a faster sign-up process, and making it easier for customers to add beneficiaries to their account. We are better at all of those things. And that translates into a much better customer experience. I think we are much higher than the average. We are tied with Vanguard's levels of customer satisfaction.

And on transparency, that ties into our pillar of making sure our clients have peace of mind. Peace of mind is driven by, yes, understanding what you own and understanding how the service works. Having that level of comfort is very important. And we are very clear on all of that. But I also think peace of mind comes from knowing that your financial provider is working in your best interest. We are doing that in a way that others are not.

Chaparro: Morgan Stanley put out a big note on the future of fintech back in May in which they argued that "only a handful of roboadvice startups will survive." Those that don't survive will consolidate or be bought up by legacy firms. Do you think this is how things will play out?

Stein: It's the way things have gone in every other industry and during every other cycle in this industry. So I expect that is right. That doesn't mean there aren't going to be new ideas coming out and new competitors emerging for decades to come.

But we have to ask ourselves: How many of these players can actually make it to scale? In financial services, it is not many. How many big financial services brands have broken out in the last three decades? It is very few. What's the brand-new bank that has come along? There's none. What's the new investing firm that has broken out and taken a lot of share? There are a couple that I probably know of, but they're not on the public's radar. Maybe like Financial Engine or DFA.

There are a couple of firms that have gotten big, but they're not a huge name. PayPal did it. Capital One did it. But it's few. So I agree with their thesis: Few will survive, and there will be consolidation.

Bezos Amazon Chaparro: Incumbents have had their own robo offerings for years, and they have their big brand and infrastructure to back them up. What makes you so certain Betterment can survive up against such competition?

Stein: For the same reason why we often see those few innovators break out.

You could also ask "Why did Amazon break out and become the dominant online retailer?" — some would say dominant retailer period. And why wasn't it Barnes and Nobles, Target, or Walmart, or anybody else? It is because Amazon has a specific focus. They didn't have conflicts with a set of existing infrastructure and systems and people who were built around doing things the old way.

Morgan Stanley, for instance, is a firm set up to serve clients the old way. As a result, they are having a really hard time shifting to this new paradigm of pure customer alignment because that's not their model. Their model is brokerage alignment. It is a brokerage model. They are there to sell you a product, whatever product makes them the most money. That tends to be the one that they favor.

The DOL's fiduciary rule, which is now partially enacted, tries to eliminate those conflicts of interest under retirement accounts. We think every account should have an adviser that is aligned with customer interest. We think that is the future of the industry.

Editor's note: Morgan Stanley declined to comment on Stein's comments. The Wall Street giant has taken many notable steps to digitize its wealth-management offerings. As Business Insider's Matt Turner reported, the bank is planning to roll out a goals-based roboadviser option for the children of existing wealthy clients and for Morgan Stanley stock-plan participants.

Chaparro: Naturally, there are a lot of folks in wealth management and financial services who don't agree with the DOL's rule. How do you respond to folks who argue that it's bad for clients because it limits choice?

Stein: I think the industry will say and do anything it can to hang on to the old way. No one argues with the idea that about $20 billion will flow from financial industry profits to client wallets if the rule is enacted. Parties on both sides agree with that annual estimate. So is that a good thing? If you're on our side, then it is.

TechCrunchDisruptSummer2010 JS01

Chaparro: Is this model part of the reason why you left Wall Street?

Stein: I left Wall Street because I wasn't fulfilled with the idea that I could have a career by just helping banks sell more product and helping banks make more money. I wanted to be able to get closer to the customer and to build something that mattered, that made a difference in the world, that really changed the game. And I saw a bunch of opportunities to do that.

The most glaring one was investment management, where there had been no innovation from a customer perspective in decades, in my opinion. Maybe there had been innovation on the back end for the affluent. But for the mass-market customers, the side we tend to serve, there had been very limited improvement. And so much technological change has occurred.

I mentioned this idea that advice is core. That is an important part of our vision. If you believe in technology as much as we do, you then believe, for instance, that someday we will have self-driving cars. It is not a controversial thing to say that will probably happen. I think it is controversial, relatively, today that someday we will have self-managing wallets. You earn some money, and you have some preferences about how you want it saved and spent, and I believe your wallet will manage and optimize itself. You will have the right amount going into the right accounts, the right amount set aside for different needs. You can always change. Just like with a self-driving car, you can change your destination.

But all that optimization is happening for you, in a way that's aligning with your best interests. And as an adviser, we can build that future. A broker can't build that because that's not their core. A mutual-fund company can't do that. I think we are best positioned to be the financial-services firm of the future because we started with this vision of advice.

Chaparro: What's the next innovation you are excited about?

hbz 80s fashion 1986 gettyimages 499296983Stein: As far as future innovation is considered, I think we can stand out the most in personalization. We want to do more and more to give you a personalized index.

The idea that you should buy a fund with 5 million other people who are buying that fund, that is a very 1980s view of the world. Why? Because that's the only technology we could support at the time. Building indexes was hard and took a lot of math.

We can do so much better than that now. I can build you an index that takes into consideration your risk tolerance, your goals, your values and personal preferences about what kind of companies you want to invest in, and any changes that come up in your life. We can build you this separately managed index fund that will yield a higher performance. I think that's a very exciting lane.

Chaparro: As part of your strategy to target younger folks, I imagine you guys are constantly advertising on podcasts. Shifting gears a bit, do you listen to podcasts?

Stein: I do. I was driving over the weekend, and I just heard one of our ads. This weekend I was listening to "Reply All," "99% Invisible," and "StartUp." I listen to a lot of them.

Chaparro: What other hobbies do you have?

Stein: We have a garden on our deck. We've got tomatoes, cherries, strawberries, squash. In past years, we've had okra.

Chaparro: How did you get into gardening?

Stein: Also, I'm a big student of happiness and figuring out what makes us happy. Part of the reason why I started this company is I think having purpose and doing something with purpose is

          "Tonight's Word: North Star" - Heisenberg - 7.2.17   
Entry Submitted by Heisenberg at 7:06 PM EDT on July 2, 2017



You, who choose to lead, must follow
But if you fall you fall alone.
If you should stand then who's to guide you?
If I knew the way I would take you home. - Ripple


And that brings us to tonight's word: NORTH STAR

Thank you for choosing Paddy's Pub. We know you have a choice of intel sites with Guinness on tap and your business is appreciated. To help us better serve you in the future would you mind completing our exit survey? Thank you in advance.

Are you satisfied with the service you've been provided?

Do you feel you found a teacher in your time here?

Do you feel you found a friend in your time here?

Do you feel you've helped others here?

Do you feel you had a North Star prior to visiting here?

Do you feel you have a North Star after your time here?

Are you confident that you are well prepared for your new chosen life?

Would you recommend Paddy's Pub to friends and family?

Please like us on Yelp.

I will testify my time here at Paddy's pub has given me an education that I cannot put a price tag on. I guess as in life, you get out of something only what you put into it. Like some people are content with a ribeye while others will keep digging all the way to the marrow. Some will go all the way to making ox tail soup. Or head cheese. Or blood sausage. Or kidney pie. Or chicharones. Many chefs believe that peasant food is the best food there is. It's also the mark of a good chef. They feel it takes true talent to take the scraps and unused parts and turn it in to something delectable and scrumptous (guess it's easy to make filet mignon and lobster taste good. Salt, pepper and butter). Peasant food is art at a cuisine level. Ratatouille. Menudo. Collard greens. Stale bread soup. Polenta. As I travel the world I think I'll take time out to visit the little grandmas kitchens that are still kicking it. There's no school like the old school. Maybe fund community kitchens so the old ways of cooking can be taught to the next generation. Just in case those Star Trek replicators can't make a proper sopapilla. Sorry guys. Some things can't be replicated. There I go…digressing again.

The North Star. The North Star is a guiding light. Something you can look to always keep you on course. No matter how stoney the path or blinding the road are, you can always count on it to pull you thru ass intact. Your personal North Star is always there. Riding high or flat on your back....it's a forgiving star. It doesn't care what you did in Vegas. It doesn't care you custom painted your G5 pink with hearts and unicorns and plastered your call sign "Zimtopia" on the tail. I think it can keep a pretty good secret too. I like to think I came in with a pretty decent North Star. My music has always told me where to go. And I had some paring carents who are always there for me emotionally. But as good as I thought my North Star was, somewhere along the way in Paddys Pub, it got jacked.



Oh wait, wrong gif



hold on, got a call into the CEO of Giphy



(That was supposed to be Top Gun volleyball scene, you know..cause those guys were jacked? Last time I put Giphy on auto pilot. Forget it..moment's gone). Somebody put North Star steroids in my Guinness. All the teachers and all the lessons and the channeling in the pub did a helluva number. Now that thing's shining like a midnight sun.

Years from now when some 3Der knuckel dragger ruffles my feathers, I'm sure to look to my North Star and think of all those here that helped shape it. I'll look to it and remember Yosef's words reminding us of God's endless love. That's a good one. We'll all be living proof of that. If you see a pink G5 taxing at La Guardia, you'll know He really really loves us, warts and all. And I'll remember that if we could get thru 13 millenia of the suck, we can get thru anything.

And from One Who Kicks It Up A Notch (Emeril Lagasse..Bam!) I learned to take a second look around. Maybe things aren't what they seem. Orrrrr, maybe they are exactly what they seem. And that all is well. Tick tock.

And from Patrick I learned unending patience in the tempest. And also diligence. Put your nose to the grindstone, roll up your sleeves and get the job done. He's a man of few words but when he does speak..very profound. His words are laser guided. And effective. I hope to add that to my North Star. Heisenberg...a man of few words? We can only pray. Hey now.

On this day, I'm thinking of all the time I put into this investment. Tuesdays and Thursdays were the roughest. Quick replay of the big call before the new one. Then when it was over, skipped over the RTC to see if Yosef or Fisher were in a talkative mood. Sometimes that went on well past 2 am. Basically, after work, 2 nights a week were shot. I guess no one can ever accuse us of being noncommittal. Where ever that commitment lays.

And how about the congregation? How's your personal North Star? Is it tuned up? Is it gassed up ready to ride? Did you have a good one coming into this journey? How about now that you're leaving? Is that star brighter? Or is it dimmer? Are your footsteps firm? Or are you more confused now than ever? Years from now are you going to say to yourself "What would Yosef do?". WWYD? I just might. Maybe someday when you're exhausted from juggling too many projects, in a solitary moment, you hear the line "And you give yourself away. And you give yourself away." And you say to yourself: what does that even mean? Give yourself away? What are you trying to tell me? Am I trying to do too much and not being "in joy"? You're kinda right, this is a little overwhelming. Bit off a bit more than I can chew. Maybe I should stop being a control freak and let other people help with my projects. Maybe I should not try to be all things to all people. Yeah, that's the ticket. Thanks, North Star, you're a peach. Let's see...where's those Yellow Pages? Let my fingers do the walking. 1-800 millennial? Put me down for a baker's dozen…to go. It's a beautiful day. Indeed it is, brother Bono. Indeed it is.

So how's about we sit down with a warm cup of tea and crumpets and open the minds eye to the answers? Maybe you'll find direction around some corner where it's been waiting to meet you. Or maybe step out under the night sky, look up, find your Northstar and just stare at it. Let it talk to you. It'll tell you where to go. If you let it.

"If my words did glow with the gold of sunshine
And my tunes were played on the harp unstrung
Would you hear my voice come through the music
Would you hold it near as it were your own?" - Ripple




And that's the word

Heisenberg

https://youtu.be/I1wg1DNHbNU

https://youtu.be/bx1Bh8ZvH84

https://youtu.be/2g5yGn-ewA0

https://youtu.be/CFsbAuX9P4w

https://youtu.be/XmSdTa9kaiQ

https://youtu.be/jLcjii3ljuQ














"The Rising"


Can't see nothing in front of me
Can't see nothing coming up behind
I make my way through this darkness
I can't feel nothing but this chain that binds me
Lost track of how far I've gone
How far I've gone, how high I've climbed
On my back's a sixty pound stone
On my shoulder half mile of line

Come on up for the rising
Come on up lay your hands in mine
Come on up for the rising
Come on up for the rising tonight

Left the house this morning
Bells ringing filled the air
I was wearing the cross of my calling
On wheels of fire I come rolling down here

Come on up for the rising
Come on up lay your hands in mine
Come on up for the rising
Come on up for the rising tonight

There's spirits above and behind me
Faces gone black, eyes burning bright
May their precious blood bind me
Lord as I stand before your fiery light

I see you Mary in the garden
In the garden of a thousand sighs
There's holy pictures of our children
Dancing in a sky filled with light
May I feel your arms around me
May I feel your blood mix with mine (ooh ooh ooh)
A dream of life comes to me
Like a catfish dancing on the end of my line (ooh ooh ooh)

Sky of blackness and sorrow (a dream of life)
Sky of love, sky of tears (a dream of life) (ooh ooh ooh)
Sky of glory and sadness (a dream of life)
Sky of mercy, sky of fear (a dream of life) (ooh ooh ooh)
Sky of memory and shadow (a dream of life)
Your burning wind fills my arms tonight (ooh ooh ooh)
Sky of longing and emptiness (a dream of life)
Sky of fullness, sky of blessed life

Come on up for the rising
Come on up lay your hands in mine
Come on up for the rising
Come on up for the rising tonight

          The musical, millennial life of 'Baby Driver's' Ansel Elgort   
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          Entre mirreyes y millennials nos veremos: Los liderazgos de las nuevas generaciones   

Los arquetipos son implacables y imparables. Y si las nuevas generaciones no los saben administrar y reciclar de forma correcta, terminarán por administrar sus vidas y sus mente para vivir experiencias tele dirigidas.

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          Comment on Nick Diaz notified of potential UFC anti-doping policy violation by USADA by TheCerealKiller   
You are the problem with this country. He was given the rules, but you and he think you don't have to obey the rules. They don't have to follow him on Twitter to find him, he has to tell them where he is. I can't wait for this Millennial generation to be silenced.
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United Record Pressing expands workforce with new interest from millennials
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Cynthia Rodríguez habla sobre sus múltiples facetas tanto en la música como en la televisión; ahora va por más y busca seducir a los millennials como youtuber
          The CEO of an investing startup taking in $12 million a day on the future of finance, millennials, and happiness   

jon stein ceo betterment 3Betterment

It took a year for the roboadviser Betterment to reach $10 million in assets under management.

That day, in 2011, was a big one for founder Jon Stein, 37, who set up the company after working at First Manhattan Consulting Group. He recalls going out to dinner that evening and being in awe of having so many people trust him and his company with their money. Now the company pulls in $12 million a day.

Betterment is the largest independent roboadviser in the world, with $9 billion under management and 270,000 customers. Betterment is currently valued at $700 million, according to a company spokeswoman.

Betterment provides financial advice online and via a smartphone app. Rather than using human managers to build portfolios, roboadvisers like Betterment use algorithms to determine where to invest. Global assets managed by robos could reach $13 trillion by 2025 in a best-case scenario, according to a group of equity analysts at Morgan Stanley. That would be up from $100 billion in December.

Betterment's growth has been impressive, but it still faces steep competition. The wealth-management space has caught on that roboadvisers are hot, and many big firms have rolled out their own robo offerings. Charles Schwab and Vanguard are two such giants with trillions of dollars in assets under management.

Stein is resolute in his belief, however, that those firms are rooted in the old way. Business Insider recently met up with Stein at Betterment's Manhattan office to talk about the company's journey, the future of wealth management and the firm, and happiness.

This interview has been edited for clarity and length.

Frank Chaparro: How's business?

Jon Stein: We have had an incredible run. We are the largest independent online financial adviser. And this has been a goal of ours since we started the company seven years ago. We just celebrated our seventh anniversary. We have grown something like 300% year-over-year for that entire time. When we first started out, it took us a year to get to $10 million assets under management. When we did, I couldn't believe it.

It took us another six months to get to $20 million. It then took us another three months to get to $30 million. We just kept growing faster and faster and faster. And today we bring in $10 million on an average day. Our business has changed a lot, in one sense. We are growing so well, and that growth is accelerating. And our offerings are much more sophisticated than when we started.

But in another sense, we are doing the same thing we have always been doing — that is, thinking about the customer and what the customer wants, and then building financial services in a way that actually responds to customer demands, which I think is not the way the old guard has done things. The old way just sells the product. The old way has the product they want to push. Our vision is that the service should be built around the customer and it should be very personalized. It should be built for their needs. It should be very convenient and strip away unnecessary complexities, and it should give them peace of mind.

robotEric Thayer/GettyChaparro: In February, Betterment rolled out an offering that would provide users with access to human financial advisers. It appears that the pure robo-only model is unsustainable and that firms have to go hybrid, with a bit of old and new. Was this the thought process behind the move?

Stein: Our goal, long-term, is to be our customers' central financial relationship. We want them to be able to manage everything in one place when they come to Betterment. We give them guidance about their full financial life with that holistic view. That's what customers want. They want that ability to manage everything in one place.

And that's why we rolled out Betterment Plus and Premium. We want to be able to answer any question our clients have. We want to make it clear to everyone that people can call us and get advice and guidance on any financial question. Just call us. I don't think we've been clear enough about that even today. I think there is more work to do. And I think you will see us over the course of the year rolling out better ways that make it really obvious that anyone can get financial advice here on anything. Because we have certified financial planners who are willing to answer any question.

Chaparro: It's been said that pure roboplatforms could face trouble if there is a downturn. Without that hand-holding and someone to talk to, investors might pull —

j00322_004_237BettermentStein: Says who? I don't think that prop really resonates with customers.

If you talk to customers and ask them, "What do you want from your financial adviser?" They don't say, "We really want someone who is going to be there for me during a downturn." That's a very industry-oriented way of thinking about justifying your value as a financial adviser. It's not really what customers care about or want. They want performance. The reason they hire us is because we maximize their money. That is core to our value.

Convenience is another. They want it easy. They want it fast. They want transfers to happen quickly, and they want peace of mind. Peace of mind is related to the idea that you can talk to someone, but it is not actually "I want someone to hold my hand in a downturn." Rather, it is more like "I want to know that my financial adviser is on my side."

So Betterment is a fiduciary, so we work only for our customers. We only work in their best interest, and we always have. Charles Schwab can't say that. Schwab is a brokerage firm selling you a product. Vanguard can't say that. Vanguard is a mutual-fund supermarket. They do not care if you maximize your money because that's not their goal. That's not their objective function. Their objective function is to sell funds.

The old way doesn't really think about what is in the customer's best interest. So it is hard to get peace of mind that you are getting what is best for your money if that's not their goal.

Editor's note: We reached out to Vanguard and Charles Schwab to respond to Stein's comments.

  • Charles Schwab said: "Jon is wrong about his fiduciary point. All of Schwab's advisory services, including our roboadvisory service, Schwab Intelligent Portfolios, are fiduciary, which means we put our clients' interests first when giving advice."
  • Vanguard said: "As the industry's only client-owned asset manager, Vanguard is not only structured to serve our clients' best interest, but guided by the noble premise that an investment company should exist to make money for our clients — not from our clients."

Chaparro: What is your target demographic?

Stein: We look at our target customer as someone who is 35 to 55 years old with $100,000 to $2 million of investable assets. But we are open to everyone. We get a lot of people with less than that because we have no minimum balance. The folks with $10 million plus are well-served by private wealth managers and family offices. The folks in the $2 million to $10 million range are decently served. But people with less than that are just getting ripped off, and not getting a lot for the financial advice they pay for. So that's the market we serve best.

Chaparro: UBS put out a note last week about how the millennial generation is about to benefit from "one of the largest intergenerational wealth transfers in history." Do you view this as a tailwind for Betterment?

Stein: Definitely. I think every 30 or 40 years, historically, in this industry, there has been a new wave of technological change or regulatory change that brings about a new crop of firms that grow to be significant players in the space. I think the last time we saw this was with the growth of Vanguard and Schwab, which were both born in the 1970s. And it took them a long time to get scale. Probably about two decades.

We think we can accelerate that, and we are already growing faster than they did in the early days. We are also growing faster than mutual funds did in their early days, and we are growing faster than ETFs in their early days.

millennials festival friends funJason Kempin / Staff / Getty Images

Chaparro: Why has that been possible?

Stein: With Betterment, it is obvious why you should switch from the old way. We do things for you that the other firms do not. For starters, we make you more money — more take-home returns than you can get anywhere else. That is the value that we provide.

The headwind to growth is that people hate to talk about finance. And there is a lot of inertia as a result. People feel like "I am probably not getting the most out of my money." They have doubts and are not confident in their money management, but they think that everything else is equally bad — everything is the same, essentially.

Our job is to open people's eyes that Betterment represents a generation shift — that it is a different way of thinking about your money and what it can do for you. We're not looking to tell people that they've been doing the wrong thing for the past 30 years, because they haven't. This didn't exist before. But now that it does, and they have to take advantage of it.

Chaparro: When we think about what matters to millennials, the things that come to mind are transparency, customer service, and performance. How does Betterment stack up on those fronts?

10000th Customer Group 2BettermentStein: On every point, we win.

On performance, we do more to personalize the portfolio to meet your actual needs than anyone else. And that helps improve performance. We help improve your take-home returns through tax-loss harvesting, through dividend shielding, through intelligent rebalancing and other intelligent software.

On the theme of convenience, I'll call it — customer service, as you mentioned, is a part of that. That's a big piece. Being accessible and being able to answer questions is an integral component. But convenience also includes other things, such as having faster money movements and a faster sign-up process, and making it easier for customers to add beneficiaries to their account. We are better at all of those things. And that translates into a much better customer experience. I think we are much higher than the average. We are tied with Vanguard's levels of customer satisfaction.

And on transparency, that ties into our pillar of making sure our clients have peace of mind. Peace of mind is driven by, yes, understanding what you own and understanding how the service works. Having that level of comfort is very important. And we are very clear on all of that. But I also think peace of mind comes from knowing that your financial provider is working in your best interest. We are doing that in a way that others are not.

Chaparro: Morgan Stanley put out a big note on the future of fintech back in May in which they argued that "only a handful of roboadvice startups will survive." Those that don't survive will consolidate or be bought up by legacy firms. Do you think this is how things will play out?

Stein: It's the way things have gone in every other industry and during every other cycle in this industry. So I expect that is right. That doesn't mean there aren't going to be new ideas coming out and new competitors emerging for decades to come.

But we have to ask ourselves: How many of these players can actually make it to scale? In financial services, it is not many. How many big financial services brands have broken out in the last three decades? It is very few. What's the brand-new bank that has come along? There's none. What's the new investing firm that has broken out and taken a lot of share? There are a couple that I probably know of, but they're not on the public's radar. Maybe like Financial Engine or DFA.

There are a couple of firms that have gotten big, but they're not a huge name. PayPal did it. Capital One did it. But it's few. So I agree with their thesis: Few will survive, and there will be consolidation.

Bezos Amazon Ted S. Warren/APChaparro: Incumbents have had their own robo offerings for years, and they have their big brand and infrastructure to back them up. What makes you so certain Betterment can survive up against such competition?

Stein: For the same reason why we often see those few innovators break out.

You could also ask "Why did Amazon break out and become the dominant online retailer?" — some would say dominant retailer period. And why wasn't it Barnes and Nobles, Target, or Walmart, or anybody else? It is because Amazon has a specific focus. They didn't have conflicts with a set of existing infrastructure and systems and people who were built around doing things the old way.

Morgan Stanley, for instance, is a firm set up to serve clients the old way. As a result, they are having a really hard time shifting to this new paradigm of pure customer alignment because that's not their model. Their model is brokerage alignment. It is a brokerage model. They are there to sell you a product, whatever product makes them the most money. That tends to be the one that they favor.

The DOL's fiduciary rule, which is now partially enacted, tries to eliminate those conflicts of interest under retirement accounts. We think every account should have an adviser that is aligned with customer interest. We think that is the future of the industry.

Editor's note: Morgan Stanley declined to comment on Stein's comments. The Wall Street giant has taken many notable steps to digitize its wealth-management offerings. As Business Insider's Matt Turner reported, the bank is planning to roll out a goals-based roboadviser option for the children of existing wealthy clients and for Morgan Stanley stock-plan participants.

Chaparro: Naturally, there are a lot of folks in wealth management and financial services who don't agree with the DOL's rule. How do you respond to folks who argue that it's bad for clients because it limits choice?

Stein: I think the industry will say and do anything it can to hang on to the old way. No one argues with the idea that about $20 billion will flow from financial industry profits to client wallets if the rule is enacted. Parties on both sides agree with that annual estimate. So is that a good thing? If you're on our side, then it is.

TechCrunchDisruptSummer2010 JS01Betterment

Chaparro: Is this model part of the reason why you left Wall Street?

Stein: I left Wall Street because I wasn't fulfilled with the idea that I could have a career by just helping banks sell more product and helping banks make more money. I wanted to be able to get closer to the customer and to build something that mattered, that made a difference in the world, that really changed the game. And I saw a bunch of opportunities to do that.

The most glaring one was investment management, where there had been no innovation from a customer perspective in decades, in my opinion. Maybe there had been innovation on the back end for the affluent. But for the mass-market customers, the side we tend to serve, there had been very limited improvement. And so much technological change has occurred.

I mentioned this idea that advice is core. That is an important part of our vision. If you believe in technology as much as we do, you then believe, for instance, that someday we will have self-driving cars. It is not a controversial thing to say that will probably happen. I think it is controversial, relatively, today that someday we will have self-managing wallets. You earn some money, and you have some preferences about how you want it saved and spent, and I believe your wallet will manage and optimize itself. You will have the right amount going into the right accounts, the right amount set aside for different needs. You can always change. Just like with a self-driving car, you can change your destination.

But all that optimization is happening for you, in a way that's aligning with your best interests. And as an adviser, we can build that future. A broker can't build that because that's not their core. A mutual-fund company can't do that. I think we are best positioned to be the financial-services firm of the future because we started with this vision of advice.

Chaparro: What's the next innovation you are excited about?

hbz 80s fashion 1986 gettyimages 499296983Harpers BazaarStein: As far as future innovation is considered, I think we can stand out the most in personalization. We want to do more and more to give you a personalized index.

The idea that you should buy a fund with 5 million other people who are buying that fund, that is a very 1980s view of the world. Why? Because that's the only technology we could support at the time. Building indexes was hard and took a lot of math.

We can do so much better than that now. I can build you an index that takes into consideration your risk tolerance, your goals, your values and personal preferences about what kind of companies you want to invest in, and any changes that come up in your life. We can build you this separately managed index fund that will yield a higher performance. I think that's a very exciting lane.

Chaparro: As part of your strategy to target younger folks, I imagine you guys are constantly advertising on podcasts. Shifting gears a bit, do you listen to podcasts?

Stein: I do. I was driving over the weekend, and I just heard one of our ads. This weekend I was listening to "Reply All," "99% Invisible," and "StartUp." I listen to a lot of them.

Chaparro: What other hobbies do you have?

Stein: We have a garden on our deck. We've got tomatoes, cherries, strawberries, squash. In past years, we've had okra.

Chaparro: How did you get into gardening?

Stein: Also, I'm a big student of happiness and figuring out what makes us happy. Part of the reason why I started this company is I think having purpose and doing something with purpose is one of the key drivers of happiness — much more so than financial gain or money.

More money doesn't really make people happier. Having purpose and having peace of mind about your money makes us happy. Gardening is one of those things that is well-correlated with happiness. I just like the idea of it.

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Eau Claire rebuilt downtown and embraced the arts. Now Justin Vernon's Eaux Claires festival has put it on the map.
      

          Chatbots, la revolución en las tiendas virtuales   
A medida que el consumidor está más cómodo haciendo uso del universo digital, las empresas de moda se están viendo obligadas a acercarse al cliente: la novedad son los «chatbots». Se trata de aplicaciones informáticas de inteligencia artificial que pueden facilitar todo tipo de operaciones online al cliente, sin ayuda ni intervención humana. Con Siri de Apple como antecesor, estos programas robotizados permiten una tremenda variedad de acciones y respuestas en sintonía con las necesidades del comprador. Pueden aceptar suscripciones, contestar a preguntas, resolver ciertos problemas o entablar una conversación escrita e incluso hablada de modo rápido y resolutivo. Pero lo que más identifica a los chatbots es su capacidad de contestar a los clientes como si se tratase de personas, de modo que puedan pasar el «Test de Turing». Dicho test fue una de las numerosas creaciones informáticas que Alan Turing llevó a cabo, bien reflejado en la película «The Imitation Game» protagonizada por Benedict Cumberbatch y Keira Knightley. El «Test de Turing» determina si el participante en una comunicación a distancia es una máquina o un ser humano, objetivo este último de los «chatbots» actuales. Son muchas las empresas que ya utilizan sistemas de «chatbots» en tiempo real. Amazon ha comenzado a trabajar con su Echo, que permite hacer pedidos verbalmente y escuchar música, mientras que su Echo Look presenta una cámara activada por voz que permitirá tomar «selfies» del cliente para aconsejarle prendas de ropa adecuadas a su físico. En el mundo de la moda, un chat ayuda a elegir talla, a gestionar una devolución, a resolver dudas sobre el corte de una prenda, a informarse sobre los detalles de un pedido a medida, a imaginarse con un modelo en concreto en una fotocomposición ficticia, a devolver una prenda por otra o a entrar en una lista de espera para un artículo. Las grandes marcas de la industria del lujo también quieren facilitar el camino a una clientela cada vez más acostumbrada a operar online, a consultar las redes antes de visitar un establecimiento comercial, a comprar directamente tras el desfile o a elegir su vestuario sin ni siquiera probárselo. Es así como Burberry, más pionero en temas digitales que en temas de diseño, lanzó su chatbot durante la Semana de la Moda de Nueva York el año pasado, ofreciendo la posibilidad de realizar pedidos anticipados de piezas u obtener información sobre la pasarela en vivo. Tommy Hilfiger puso en funcionamiento su chatbot en septiembre del 2016, cuando se anunció la colaboración de la modelo Gigi Hadid con la casa neoyorquina. Ofrece consejo sobre estilismos aconseja al cliente que busca un nuevo atuendo, permite comprobar si existe stock de una pieza y con voz cantarina y espontánea engatusa a su enorme clientela de millennials. Prestigiosas marcas de relojería, como Audemars Piguet o Jaeger-LeCoultre se han unido a la iniciativa de crear sus propios chatbots, conscientes de que los fans de las marcas pueden disfrutar visitando en vídeo las sedes de la empresa, elegir una correa determinada o conocer en vivo los detalles de las complicaciones de algún reloj concreto. Se calcula que los «bots» pueden responder bien a un 30% de las peticiones que un cliente realiza. ¿Pero, qué hay del otro 70%? El servicio personal y la creatividad humana no serán fácilmente sustituibles.
          "This is a war": Inside the global "pro-family" movement against abortion and LGBT rights   

At a recent summit in Budapest, anti-abortion celebrities and anti-gay rights activists gathered with their political allies waging a ‘spiritual war’ for the ‘traditional family.’

World Congress of Families summit in Budapest. World Congress of Families summit in Budapest. Photo: Claire Provost. In a darkened hall at the Budapest Congress Centre, an image of the classic American TV show, The Brady Bunch, appears illuminated on a giant screen. At the podium is Jack Hanick, a former Fox News producer who describes television as “at the centre of a spiritual war”.

Hanick points to the 1950s as the golden age, when “the father was the central figure” and “the mother stayed at home.” The Bradys were not his wholesome ideal but the beginning of the decay: a “blended family” of stepparents and stepchildren, where the father “has power over only half of the children”.

Fast forward to today and the hit sitcom Modern Family “idealises same sex marriage”. This, Hanick said, is the latest chapter in “TV’s role in the destruction of the traditional family”. He claimed: “This is a war, but it is not a war to be waged in the physical world”.

Hanick was in Hungary in late May for the 11th World Congress of Families summit, with hundreds of other anti-abortion and anti-LGBT activists and their political allies from across the globe. The conference programme described its goal as “to unite and equip leaders to promote the natural family”.

Speakers were explicit: this means a married mother and father and their children. They name-checked diverse fights against comprehensive sexuality education, abortion, same-sex marriage, “gender ideology,” surrogacy, and euthanasia.

But they called for positive, “winning messages,” alliances, and strategies that go after “hearts and minds” – recalling the shorthand used repeatedly by the US for winning over supporters and public opinion in the context of wars.

Several speakers talked specifically about “appropriating the language” of human rights to bolster conservative campaigns.

"this is a war, but it is not a war to be waged in the physical world"

Attendees included anti-abortion celebrities like Lila Rose, founder of Live Action – the online “pro-life” movement using new media to “target millennial women.” Others came from groups like the National Organisation for Marriage (NOM) and the Alliance for the Defence of Freedom (ADF).

These groups are well-known to women’s rights activists. In the US, the WCF has been described by the Southern Poverty Law Centre as an anti-LGBT “hate group”. The progressive thinktank Political Research Associates says it’s among “the major driving forces behind the US Religious Right’s global export of homophobia and sexism”.

NOM was formed in 2007 specifically to pass California’s Proposition 8 bill to prohibit same-sex marriage. ADF also focuses on legal advocacy. Its founder, Alan Sears, co-wrote a book called The Homosexual Agenda: Exposing the Principal Threat to Religious Freedom Today.

On the WCF programme there were pastors and bishops along with MPs, activists and academics. Delegates came from around the world, including Trinidad and Tobago, Nigeria, and Kenya. Many were from Hungary and the US.

The theme of the summit – “Building Family-Friendly Nations: Making Families Great Again” – included a hint of the “Make America Great Again” slogan used by US President Donald Trump in his election campaign.

Registration was free – though “VIP” tickets were also available at $350 per person, or $500 per married couple, including special receptions, lunches, and a “networking lounge.” There was also an extra one-day European pro-life forum.

After lunch, participants split into groups for sessions like “family advocacy at international institutions” and an “emerging leaders pro-family training” focused on “how to win at networking, campaigning, fundraising and advocacy.”

Budapest family festival. Budapest family festival. Photo: Claire Provost.There was music, and games too. On Saturday night: a “Symphony of Life.” And on Sunday: a “Viva Familia” Family Festival in Budapest. “We are the builders of the new culture that… will span the globe,” said one speaker at the summit. “We need to redeem Hollywood,” said another.

From South Africa, one speaker said that, after the fall of apartheid in 1994, “the doors were thrown open and an ultra-liberal constitution was imposed on us...and all kinds of wickedness came into South Africa including pornography”.

The “LGBT agenda” he added, “is an ideology that's been imposed on us...it is not part of African culture, it is imported from other nations”.

“This is a war,” he insisted.

A transnational “anti-rights” alliance

For years women’s rights activists have warned that groups pushing back against rights related to gender and sexuality have become increasingly organised and interconnected. Last year, a new Observatory on the Universality of Rights (OURs) was set up by more than a dozen organisations to monitor these groups.

Their first report, released last month, mapped how a “transnational community” of “anti-rights actors” has formed and the impact it's had on “watering down of existing agreements… deadlock and conservatism in negotiations; sustained undermining of UN agencies… and success in pushing through regressive language in international human rights documents”.

Mapping anti-rights groups and connections. Mapping anti-rights groups and connections. Infographic: OURs initiative.At the Budapest summit, WCF president Brian Brown said “something new is happening.” He insisted: “what unites us is so fundamental...we have to be willing to speak together.”

Several speakers said “the family” is a “common cause” between countries including Russia and the US regardless of other tensions.

One man said explicitly that attendees should “appropriate" human rights language and use positive messages of love, joy, peace and hope to draw people in.

Another stressed the “key to winning any campaign” is to “bring the majority of the public”. He said: “that's a war of culture, of a whole society”.

After the event, a delegate from the Philippines said the WCF has “created a new model of cooperation between government and national and international family organisations on the defense of human life, the family and marriage”.

In the Philippines, abortion has been criminalised for over a century and President Rodrigo Duterte has recently said the country will not legalise same-sex marriage, stressing that it is Asia’s bastion of Roman Catholicism. Last month, Duterte also “joked” with soldiers on Mindanao island, where he imposed martial law, that they could rape women with impunity.  

In a session at the Budapest summit, Claudio D'Amico read a statement from Matteo Salvini, leader of the Italian right-wing Lega Nord (“Northern League”) party, urging collaboration to defend the “natural family” that is “constantly being threatened”.

D'Amico said pro-family agreements can be struck between MPs from diverse parties. Last year, he said, he helped organise a “Family Lunch” with representatives from countries including Azerbaijan, Belarus, Sweden and Switzerland, on the sidelines of an Organisation for Security and Cooperation in Europe (OSCE) parliamentary assembly.

World Congress of Families summit in Budapest. World Congress of Families summit in Budapest. Photo: Claire Provost.A representative from the Dveri party in Serbia said support from the WCF was “life-changing.” In 2013, “we managed to stop the Gay Pride parade in our capital city,” he said to applause. “We're looking at our neighbours, the Hungarians, as an example of how to create a family-friendly country,” he added.

Hungary is “the hero of pro-family and pro-life leaders from all over the world,” according to the WCF website, celebrating the government’s “defense of family, life, and Christianity”.

The summit itself had opened with a “pugnacious speech” by Hungarian President Viktor Orban, in which he claimed the European Union was dominated by a “liberal ideology that’s an insult to families”. The Guardian called Hungary’s hosting of the summit “the latest episode in Orban’s quest to position himself as a self-styled defender of “European Christian values”, a role he has used to justify his Fidesz government’s draconian treatment of mainly Muslim refugees and migrants”.

Under Orban’s leadership, Hungary has defined marriage as exclusively between a man and a woman, and life as beginning at conception, in its new 2011 constitution. The government has also introduced new policies to promote large families with many children in particular.

“the hero of pro-family and pro-life leaders from all over the world”

Access to abortion, while legal, has been limited by “unnecessary waiting periods, hostile counselling or conscientious objection,” according to a UN working group. Homophobic remarks have been made at the highest level, including by the mayor of Budapest who in 2015 reportedly said homosexuality is “unnatural and repulsive”.

Many of the summit attendees were from the US where Vice President Michael Pence – an “evangelical Catholic” – declared that “life is winning again in America” at an anti-abortion rally in January.

Trump’s administration has already reinstated and expanded the 'Global Gag Rule' prohibiting US foreign aid money from going to organisations that provide or even give information about abortion. It has also defunded the United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA).

Earlier this year, the US government’s official delegation to the UN’s Commission on the Status of Women meetings in New York also included an activist from the Center for Family and Human Rights (C-FAM) – a key player in the “pro-family” lobby at the international level. Among other things, C-FAM sends out e-mail newsletters with subject lines like: “Anti-Christians Continue Attack on Pro-Lifers, Your Help Needed” and “8 Days and Counting...Radical Feminists Descend on UN”.

"Positive stories"

The OURs report warned that “anti-rights actors are making inroads into human rights standards” with growing numbers and networks and “imaginative and sustained re-conceptions of what human rights norms should and do mean”.

At the international level, it said, these groups “are no longer merely on the defensive or reactive; they are strategic and proactive”. Their goal, it suggested, is to insert and insist on language at the international human rights level “that validates patriarchal, hierarchical, discriminatory and culturally relativist norms”.

Numerous alternative or parallel human rights declarations and documents have been drawn up and promoted by these groups over the years including the Declaration on Rights of Children and their Families, the Family Articles, the World Family Declaration, the Declaration on the Rights of the Family, the Decalogue of Commitments for Human Dignity and the Common Good, and the San Jose Articles – which assert state responsibility to “protect the unborn child from abortion”.

The WCF summit closed with its own declaration – a “Budapest covenant.” It says: “The natural family is the true reservoir of liberty and the foundation of effective democracy”. For avoidance of doubt, it defines this natural family as one man and one woman, married, for life, for “the purposes of procreation”.

It calls on “peoples and nations to make new alliances" for the "natural family" and put it "at the centre of political and cultural life”.

“to restore the natural family we must use TV”

In his speech, Hanick, the former Fox News producer, insisted, more specifically: “To restore the natural family we must use TV.”

“As more positive stories about any topic appear, public opinion in the US moves,” he said, adding that, when this happens, politicians and courts move too. He closed with a specific challenge to the audience: to “get one positive story about the natural family up every three months on your local TVs”.

Once that’s accomplished, he said, try for every month, then every week, then every day. “Public opinion will change,” he declared. For single, divorced and unmarried parents, LGBT communities, and the reproductive rights of women everywhere, it was an ominous promise indeed.

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          Vivo V5s Matte Black Price in the Philippines is Php 14,990, Out Now!   
Vivo Mobile Philippines has just released a new color option for their popular and best-selling Vivo V5s Selfie-Centric midrange Android Smartphone.

According to Ms. Annie Lim - Brand Director of Vivo Philippines, the Matte Black version the Vivo V5s will widen consumers’ options to suit their fashion and style preference. Furthermore, this limited edition color will likewise herald the arrival of much more sleek and trendy line of Vivo smartphones in our country soon.

Vivo V5s Matte Black

Symbolizing power and mystery in many cultures, Black - on a separate note - also goes well with any outfit or any color of clothing, making it a great choice not just for corporate professionals or businessmen but also for fashionistas.

Just like its Crown Gold and Rose Gold siblings, Vivo V5s Matte Black's body is also crafted from anodized aluminum, which makes it both durable and elegant.

Vivo V5s Matte Black

In terms of technical specifications, Vivo V5s Matte Black sports a a 5.5-inch HD IPS display, a 13 MegaPixel camera at the back with f/2.2 aperture, phase detection autofocus, and LED flash, Dual SIM Dual Standby capability, and a non-removable 3,000 mAh battery pack.

Underneath its shell, this mid-level handset runs its FunTouch OS 3.0 skinned Android 6.0 Marshmallow OS with a 64-Bit 1.5 GHz Octa Core MediaTek MT6750 processor that incorporates a Mali-T720 graphics chip, has a sizable 4GB of RAM for smooth multitasking, and comes with 64GB of expandable storage.

This model is also is equipped with 5G mobile connectivity support for faster and more stable internet connection on the go. Vivo V5s also has an OTG feature, Bluetooth 4.0, a microUSB 2.0 port, and GPS making it the good choice for techy millennials and young professionals. For avid music listeners, this handset also offers offers great audio experience with Vivo’s signature Hi-Fi heritage and the AK4376 Hi-Fi chip.

Vivo V5s Matte Black

On top of all that, the main feature of this release would have to be its front-facing selfie camera with its 20 MegaPixels resolution that further benefits from the 'Moonlight' Soft LED flash, the f/2.0 aperture, and Beauty Mode 6.0 software feature that automatically detects the user's gender and applies beautification effers accordingly. To be specific, females get softer skin tone plus a more delicate face contour as well as bigger eyes while males get a refined masculine look.

Vivo V5 Matte Black is now available at all Vivo Mobile Concept Stores, kiosks, booths, and authorized retail channels across the Philippines. It does an official retail price of Php 14,990 -- and for that amount, you already get the complete kit plus a free soft jelly case and the pre-installed heat-bonded screen protector.

TechPinas Smartphone Technical Specs Table (TSTST)
Name : Vivo V5s Matte Black Version
Type : Slate Form Factor (Full Touchscreen)
Price Category : Midrange
Dimensions : 153.8 x 75.5 x 7.6 mm
Weight : 154 grams
Available Colors : Matte Black
Operating System : Android 6.0 Marshmallow with FunTouch OS 3.0
Display : 5.5 inches (~71.8% screen-to-body ratio), 720 x 1280 pixels (~267 ppi pixel density), IPS LCD, capacitive touchscreen, 16M colors, Corning Gorilla Glass 3, 3D Touch
Processor : 64-Bit Octa Core 1.5 GHz Cortex-A53, Mali-T860MP2 GPU, Mediatek MT6750 chipset
RAM : 4GB RAM
Internal Storage : 64GB ROM, expandable via secondary hybrid nanoSIM slot that doubles as microSD card slot supporting up to 256GB
Camera : Back: 13 MegaPixels, f/2.2 aperture, phase detection autofocus (PDAF), LED flash, 1/3" sensor size, 1.12 µm pixel size
Front: 20 MegaPixels, f/2.0 aperture, 1/2.8" sensor size, Soft LED flash
Video Capture : Full HD 1080p 30 frames per second - Front and Back
Audio and Video Playback : MP3, WAV, eAAC+, FLAC, MP4, H.264
Ports : microUSB 2.0, 3.5 mm audio jack
Connectivity : Wi-Fi 802.11 a/b/g/n, Wi-Fi Direct, DLNA, Wi-Fi hotspot, Bluetooth v4.0 with A2DP, EDR, 3G HSPA+; 4G LTE
GPS : A-GPS, GLONASS
FM Radio : No
Sensors : Accelerometer, Digital Compass, Proximity, Digital Gyroscope, Fingerprint Scanner
Network : 2G bands GSM 850 / 900 / 1800 / 1900 - SIM 1 and SIM 2,
3G HSDPA 900 / 1900 / 2100
4G LTE band 1(2100), 3(1800), 5(850), 7(2600), 8(900), 38(2600), 39(1900), 40(2300), 41(2500)
SIM Card Type : Dual = microSIM + nanoSIM
Battery : Non-removable 3,000 mAh Li-Ion battery with Fast Charging Support
Uptime : TBD
Value-Added Features : FunTouch OS Features, Front Moonlight Camera, Good Set of Internal Hardware, Premium Build
Announcement : Philippines - July 1, 2017
Availability : Philippines - July 1, 2017
Price : Official SRP in the Philippines - Php 14,990

          The musical, millennial life of 'Baby Driver's' Ansel Elgort   
The star of 'Baby Driver,' and budding EDM musician, opens up about how music shapes his life
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          7/3/2017: FRONT PAGE: United Church opens doors to social enterprise   
The United Church of Canada is testing the idea of opening up sacred space to entrepreneurs in an attempt to engage millennials.
          Xennials are a mix between GenX and Millennials, born from 1977 - 1983   
Xennials are a mix between GenX and Millennials, born from 1977 - 1983: emergentpattern:I always...
          Marketing to Millennials: Reeling in the Nation’s Largest Demographic   
Millennials, now the U.S.’s largest living demographic according to the Pew Research Center, are all grown up and the most influential demographic in the convenience store marketplace. They have the wallet power to prove it and are projected to spend $200 billion this year alone. And as the first generation armed with digital devices often […]
          Bartender/Bar Manager - Pane e Bene Restaurant LLC - Westport, CT   
Professional female bartender with some experience, a fan energetic person with upscale clientele and millennials client experience. High school or equivalent....
From Indeed - Tue, 27 Jun 2017 19:04:34 GMT - View all Westport, CT jobs
          Take Out a Mortgage, Get Free Avocado Toast for a Month   
Millennials can have houses and avocado toast thanks to this cheeky mortgage company
          Chi sono i Millennials   

Lo scorso weekend abbiamo potuto osservare da vicino il dipanarsi della storia. Il ritiro di Totti e i concomitanti gol di Keane (2000) e Pellegri (2001) si sono saldati a suggellare un prima e un dopo, un’apertura e una chiusura, ponendo dei menhir abbastanza grossi per essere notati da tutti nella solita indistinta poltiglia temporale.

... continua a leggere
 

          The musical, millennial life of 'Baby Driver's' Ansel Elgort   
… was deep into a club music period when he found himself … action-musical "Baby Driver." (Sony/TriStar)Ever since the … for the young Elgort; electronic musicians like Avicii came into … someone else’s puzzle. But music, this is my puzzle. — …
          The CEO of an investing startup taking in $12 million a day on the future of finance, millennials, and happiness   

jon stein ceo betterment 3

It took a year for the roboadviser Betterment to reach $10 million in assets under management.

That day, in 2011, was a big one for founder Jon Stein, 37, who set up the company after working at First Manhattan Consulting Group. He recalls going out to dinner that evening and being in awe of having so many people trust him and his company with their money. Now the company pulls in $12 million a day.

Betterment is the largest independent roboadviser in the world, with $9 billion under management and 270,000 customers. Betterment is currently valued at $700 million, according to a company spokeswoman.

Betterment provides financial advice online and via a smartphone app. Rather than using human managers to build portfolios, roboadvisers like Betterment use algorithms to determine where to invest. Global assets managed by robos could reach $13 trillion by 2025 in a best-case scenario, according to a group of equity analysts at Morgan Stanley. That would be up from $100 billion in December.

Betterment's growth has been impressive, but it still faces steep competition. The wealth-management space has caught on that roboadvisers are hot, and many big firms have rolled out their own robo offerings. Charles Schwab and Vanguard are two such giants with trillions of dollars in assets under management.

Stein is resolute in his belief, however, that those firms are rooted in the old way. Business Insider recently met up with Stein at Betterment's Manhattan office to talk about the company's journey, the future of wealth management and the firm, and happiness.

This interview has been edited for clarity and length.

Frank Chaparro: How's business?

Jon Stein: We have had an incredible run. We are the largest independent online financial adviser. And this has been a goal of ours since we started the company seven years ago. We just celebrated our seventh anniversary. We have grown something like 300% year-over-year for that entire time. When we first started out, it took us a year to get to $10 million assets under management. When we did, I couldn't believe it.

It took us another six months to get to $20 million. It then took us another three months to get to $30 million. We just kept growing faster and faster and faster. And today we bring in $10 million on an average day. Our business has changed a lot, in one sense. We are growing so well, and that growth is accelerating. And our offerings are much more sophisticated than when we started.

But in another sense, we are doing the same thing we have always been doing — that is, thinking about the customer and what the customer wants, and then building financial services in a way that actually responds to customer demands, which I think is not the way the old guard has done things. The old way just sells the product. The old way has the product they want to push. Our vision is that the service should be built around the customer and it should be very personalized. It should be built for their needs. It should be very convenient and strip away unnecessary complexities, and it should give them peace of mind.

robotChaparro: In February, Betterment rolled out an offering that would provide users with access to human financial advisers. It appears that the pure robo-only model is unsustainable and that firms have to go hybrid, with a bit of old and new. Was this the thought process behind the move?

Stein: Our goal, long-term, is to be our customers' central financial relationship. We want them to be able to manage everything in one place when they come to Betterment. We give them guidance about their full financial life with that holistic view. That's what customers want. They want that ability to manage everything in one place.

And that's why we rolled out Betterment Plus and Premium. We want to be able to answer any question our clients have. We want to make it clear to everyone that people can call us and get advice and guidance on any financial question. Just call us. I don't think we've been clear enough about that even today. I think there is more work to do. And I think you will see us over the course of the year rolling out better ways that make it really obvious that anyone can get financial advice here on anything. Because we have certified financial planners who are willing to answer any question.

Chaparro: It's been said that pure roboplatforms could face trouble if there is a downturn. Without that hand-holding and someone to talk to, investors might pull —

j00322_004_237Stein: Says who? I don't think that prop really resonates with customers.

If you talk to customers and ask them, "What do you want from your financial adviser?" They don't say, "We really want someone who is going to be there for me during a downturn." That's a very industry-oriented way of thinking about justifying your value as a financial adviser. It's not really what customers care about or want. They want performance. The reason they hire us is because we maximize their money. That is core to our value.

Convenience is another. They want it easy. They want it fast. They want transfers to happen quickly, and they want peace of mind. Peace of mind is related to the idea that you can talk to someone, but it is not actually "I want someone to hold my hand in a downturn." Rather, it is more like "I want to know that my financial adviser is on my side."

So Betterment is a fiduciary, so we work only for our customers. We only work in their best interest, and we always have. Charles Schwab can't say that. Schwab is a brokerage firm selling you a product. Vanguard can't say that. Vanguard is a mutual-fund supermarket. They do not care if you maximize your money because that's not their goal. That's not their objective function. Their objective function is to sell funds.

The old way doesn't really think about what is in the customer's best interest. So it is hard to get peace of mind that you are getting what is best for your money if that's not their goal.

Editor's note: We reached out to Vanguard and Charles Schwab to respond to Stein's comments.

  • Charles Schwab said: "Jon is wrong about his fiduciary point. All of Schwab's advisory services, including our roboadvisory service, Schwab Intelligent Portfolios, are fiduciary, which means we put our clients' interests first when giving advice."
  • Vanguard said: "As the industry's only client-owned asset manager, Vanguard is not only structured to serve our clients' best interest, but guided by the noble premise that an investment company should exist to make money for our clients — not from our clients."

Chaparro: What is your target demographic?

Stein: We look at our target customer as someone who is 35 to 55 years old with $100,000 to $2 million of investable assets. But we are open to everyone. We get a lot of people with less than that because we have no minimum balance. The folks with $10 million plus are well-served by private wealth managers and family offices. The folks in the $2 million to $10 million range are decently served. But people with less than that are just getting ripped off, and not getting a lot for the financial advice they pay for. So that's the market we serve best.

Chaparro: UBS put out a note last week about how the millennial generation is about to benefit from "one of the largest intergenerational wealth transfers in history." Do you view this as a tailwind for Betterment?

Stein: Definitely. I think every 30 or 40 years, historically, in this industry, there has been a new wave of technological change or regulatory change that brings about a new crop of firms that grow to be significant players in the space. I think the last time we saw this was with the growth of Vanguard and Schwab, which were both born in the 1970s. And it took them a long time to get scale. Probably about two decades.

We think we can accelerate that, and we are already growing faster than they did in the early days. We are also growing faster than mutual funds did in their early days, and we are growing faster than ETFs in their early days.

millennials festival friends fun

Chaparro: Why has that been possible?

Stein: With Betterment, it is obvious why you should switch from the old way. We do things for you that the other firms do not. For starters, we make you more money — more take-home returns than you can get anywhere else. That is the value that we provide.

The headwind to growth is that people hate to talk about finance. And there is a lot of inertia as a result. People feel like "I am probably not getting the most out of my money." They have doubts and are not confident in their money management, but they think that everything else is equally bad — everything is the same, essentially.

Our job is to open people's eyes that Betterment represents a generation shift — that it is a different way of thinking about your money and what it can do for you. We're not looking to tell people that they've been doing the wrong thing for the past 30 years, because they haven't. This didn't exist before. But now that it does, and they have to take advantage of it.

Chaparro: When we think about what matters to millennials, the things that come to mind are transparency, customer service, and performance. How does Betterment stack up on those fronts?

10000th Customer Group 2Stein: On every point, we win.

On performance, we do more to personalize the portfolio to meet your actual needs than anyone else. And that helps improve performance. We help improve your take-home returns through tax-loss harvesting, through dividend shielding, through intelligent rebalancing and other intelligent software.

On the theme of convenience, I'll call it — customer service, as you mentioned, is a part of that. That's a big piece. Being accessible and being able to answer questions is an integral component. But convenience also includes other things, such as having faster money movements and a faster sign-up process, and making it easier for customers to add beneficiaries to their account. We are better at all of those things. And that translates into a much better customer experience. I think we are much higher than the average. We are tied with Vanguard's levels of customer satisfaction.

And on transparency, that ties into our pillar of making sure our clients have peace of mind. Peace of mind is driven by, yes, understanding what you own and understanding how the service works. Having that level of comfort is very important. And we are very clear on all of that. But I also think peace of mind comes from knowing that your financial provider is working in your best interest. We are doing that in a way that others are not.

Chaparro: Morgan Stanley put out a big note on the future of fintech back in May in which they argued that "only a handful of roboadvice startups will survive." Those that don't survive will consolidate or be bought up by legacy firms. Do you think this is how things will play out?

Stein: It's the way things have gone in every other industry and during every other cycle in this industry. So I expect that is right. That doesn't mean there aren't going to be new ideas coming out and new competitors emerging for decades to come.

But we have to ask ourselves: How many of these players can actually make it to scale? In financial services, it is not many. How many big financial services brands have broken out in the last three decades? It is very few. What's the brand-new bank that has come along? There's none. What's the new investing firm that has broken out and taken a lot of share? There are a couple that I probably know of, but they're not on the public's radar. Maybe like Financial Engine or DFA.

There are a couple of firms that have gotten big, but they're not a huge name. PayPal did it. Capital One did it. But it's few. So I agree with their thesis: Few will survive, and there will be consolidation.

Bezos Amazon Chaparro: Incumbents have had their own robo offerings for years, and they have their big brand and infrastructure to back them up. What makes you so certain Betterment can survive up against such competition?

Stein: For the same reason why we often see those few innovators break out.

You could also ask "Why did Amazon break out and become the dominant online retailer?" — some would say dominant retailer period. And why wasn't it Barnes and Nobles, Target, or Walmart, or anybody else? It is because Amazon has a specific focus. They didn't have conflicts with a set of existing infrastructure and systems and people who were built around doing things the old way.

Morgan Stanley, for instance, is a firm set up to serve clients the old way. As a result, they are having a really hard time shifting to this new paradigm of pure customer alignment because that's not their model. Their model is brokerage alignment. It is a brokerage model. They are there to sell you a product, whatever product makes them the most money. That tends to be the one that they favor.

The DOL's fiduciary rule, which is now partially enacted, tries to eliminate those conflicts of interest under retirement accounts. We think every account should have an adviser that is aligned with customer interest. We think that is the future of the industry.

Editor's note: Morgan Stanley declined to comment on Stein's comments. The Wall Street giant has taken many notable steps to digitize its wealth-management offerings. As Business Insider's Matt Turner reported, the bank is planning to roll out a goals-based roboadviser option for the children of existing wealthy clients and for Morgan Stanley stock-plan participants.

Chaparro: Naturally, there are a lot of folks in wealth management and financial services who don't agree with the DOL's rule. How do you respond to folks who argue that it's bad for clients because it limits choice?

Stein: I think the industry will say and do anything it can to hang on to the old way. No one argues with the idea that about $20 billion will flow from financial industry profits to client wallets if the rule is enacted. Parties on both sides agree with that annual estimate. So is that a good thing? If you're on our side, then it is.

TechCrunchDisruptSummer2010 JS01

Chaparro: Is this model part of the reason why you left Wall Street?

Stein: I left Wall Street because I wasn't fulfilled with the idea that I could have a career by just helping banks sell more product and helping banks make more money. I wanted to be able to get closer to the customer and to build something that mattered, that made a difference in the world, that really changed the game. And I saw a bunch of opportunities to do that.

The most glaring one was investment management, where there had been no innovation from a customer perspective in decades, in my opinion. Maybe there had been innovation on the back end for the affluent. But for the mass-market customers, the side we tend to serve, there had been very limited improvement. And so much technological change has occurred.

I mentioned this idea that advice is core. That is an important part of our vision. If you believe in technology as much as we do, you then believe, for instance, that someday we will have self-driving cars. It is not a controversial thing to say that will probably happen. I think it is controversial, relatively, today that someday we will have self-managing wallets. You earn some money, and you have some preferences about how you want it saved and spent, and I believe your wallet will manage and optimize itself. You will have the right amount going into the right accounts, the right amount set aside for different needs. You can always change. Just like with a self-driving car, you can change your destination.

But all that optimization is happening for you, in a way that's aligning with your best interests. And as an adviser, we can build that future. A broker can't build that because that's not their core. A mutual-fund company can't do that. I think we are best positioned to be the financial-services firm of the future because we started with this vision of advice.

Chaparro: What's the next innovation you are excited about?

hbz 80s fashion 1986 gettyimages 499296983Stein: As far as future innovation is considered, I think we can stand out the most in personalization. We want to do more and more to give you a personalized index.

The idea that you should buy a fund with 5 million other people who are buying that fund, that is a very 1980s view of the world. Why? Because that's the only technology we could support at the time. Building indexes was hard and took a lot of math.

We can do so much better than that now. I can build you an index that takes into consideration your risk tolerance, your goals, your values and personal preferences about what kind of companies you want to invest in, and any changes that come up in your life. We can build you this separately managed index fund that will yield a higher performance. I think that's a very exciting lane.

Chaparro: As part of your strategy to target younger folks, I imagine you guys are constantly advertising on podcasts. Shifting gears a bit, do you listen to podcasts?

Stein: I do. I was driving over the weekend, and I just heard one of our ads. This weekend I was listening to "Reply All," "99% Invisible," and "StartUp." I listen to a lot of them.

Chaparro: What other hobbies do you have?

Stein: We have a garden on our deck. We've got tomatoes, cherries, strawberries, squash. In past years, we've had okra.

Chaparro: How did you get into gardening?

Stein: Also, I'm a big student of happiness and figuring out what makes us happy. Part of the reason why I started this company is I think having purpose and doing something with purpose is one of the key drivers of happiness — much more so than financial gain or money.

More money doesn't really make people happier. Having purpose and having peace of mind about your money makes us happy. Gardening is one of those things that is well-correlated with happiness. I just like the idea of it.

SEE ALSO: A 'paradigm shift' is taking place in financial technology

DON'T MISS: This is the future of financial advice

Join the conversation about this story »

NOW WATCH: HENRY BLODGET: Tech market is nowhere near the dotcom days


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          Weekly Web Harvest for 2017-06-25   
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          El Brief: Unanimidad LGBT; Papa Francisco pide por Charlie Gard; Trump vuelve a liarla   

World Pride Madrid 2017

¡Buenos días, actuallers!

Estas son las historias más destacadas al comenzar este lunes 3 de julio, Santo Tomás apóstol. Si te lo han reenviado, date de alta aquí para recibirlo directamente en tu buzón.

SOLO PARA SUSCRIPTORES

El PP apoyará la ley LGBT tras haber sido invitado por primera vez al desfile del Orgullo celebrado este sábado en Madrid.

La adhesión unánime se expresa en esa imagen de políticos de todos los partidos bailando sobre el escenario de los festejos. La votación de septiembre en el Parlamento será su lógico corolario.

Redactado por los grupos de presión y tramitado por Podemos, el proyecto de ley creará medidas policiales contra las opiniones diferentes a las de los grupos LGBT que han redactado la norma.

Ataques violentos como el que sufrió la sede de HazteOir.org en Madrid este fin de semana, coincidiendo con las celebraciones del Orgullo, estarán regulados, adoptarán otras formas como la censura previa y la multa, y serán competencia del Gobierno y sus funcionarios.

La nueva ley también instalará una educación obligatoria de la sexualidad humana con una sola perspectiva ideológica, asumida como la única verdadera, emancipadora y saludable.

El Estado dejará oficialmente de ser neutral en la conducta sexual, y promocionará los derechos de unas personas –incluso en contra de los derechos de las demás–, solo por cómo practican sexo.

La identidad sexual de cada uno pasará a ser de interés público y policial. Así se erigirá la nueva ciudad democrática de las identidades, como una nueva torre de Babel de los derechos grupales. La discriminación se llamará igualdad, y el escarmiento de unos será la inclusión de otros.

Como en El escudo de la ciudad, el cuento de Kafka sobre la construcción de una torre, el edificio no se acabará nunca, pero los obreros lucharán entre ellos por el dominio. Esa será la verdadera obra. Vigilada por el puño amoroso e implacable del arquitecto.

++++Puedes firmar por la libertad y frente a las leyes LGBT: Hay una petición activa en CitizenGO.org para intentar frenar, por medio de una recogida de firmas, la tramitación de la llamada “ley mordaza LGBT” de Podemos. La petición se dirige a los diputados que pueden hacer más para pararla, especialmente, los del Grupo Popular. La han firmado ya 44.000 personas. Puedes unirte aquí.

CON VOZ PROPIA

“Creo que el colectivo feminista, como el colectivo gay, son colectivos poderosos y presionan porque sienten que algo les falta. Pero tampoco pueden pasar por encima de los demás. Me resulta muy difícil entender que en la Bienal de Venecia se extienda el discurso de que faltan mujeres, por ejemplo. ¿Ponemos cuotas porque sí? ¿Inventamos la Historia del Arte a partir del sexo?”

[Manolo Valdés, pintor, Premio Nacional de Artes Plásticas, entrevista en El Español, 2 de julio de 2017]

“Parte de la izquierda europea apoya a grupos que matan a gais y maltratan a mujeres, que queman iglesias y sinagogas y que piensan que está bien matar a los judíos porque son judíos, y a los cristianos porque son cristianos.”

[Yair Lapid, líder del partido centrista Yesh Atid y candidato a primer ministro de Israel, entrevista en El País, 2 de julio de 2017]

Francisco apoya a los padres de Charlie Gard. El papa pidió este domingo a las autoridades británicas que dejen vivir al bebé de diez meses enfermo, a quien sus padres quieren cuidar con un tratamiento experimental en un hospital de los Estados Unidos. Una sentencia del Tribunal Europeo de Derechos Humanos dijo la semana pasada que el bebé debe ser desconectado, en contra de la voluntad de sus padres. De momento, la alocución del papa y la presión de miles de ciudadanos han conseguido aplazar la desconexión de Charlie. (Crux, en inglés)

+++Firma para salvar a Charlie Gard: Hay una petición activa en CitizenGO.org, para que las autoridades británicas no desconecten a Charlie Gard. Ya la han firmado 170.000 personas. Puedes unirte a ellas, y así ayudar a los padres de Charlie a salvar su vida. Para firmar la petición, entra aquí.

++++Más información sobre el ‘caso Charlie Gard’: La sentencia del Tribunal Europeo que obliga a acabar con la vida del bebé Charlie Gard, en contra de la voluntad de sus padres, ha suscitado reacciones de estupor y repulsa a escala global. El genetista Domenico Coviello afirma que “no es papel de los médicos poner fin a la vida de un niño”, según recoge el diario Infocatólica. En Actuall, Elentir compara la indiferencia de los medios  y del público por la desconexión del pequeño, con “la Europa que lloró por Excalibur”, el perro de la enfermera española contagiada del ébola,al que las autoridades sacrificaron por el riesgo de que transmitiese la enfermedad.

Detienen al coordinador de la oposición en Venezuela. El presidente de la Asamblea Nacional, Julio Borges, denunció la “detención arbitraria” del coordinador de la coalición opositora Mesa de la Unidad Democrática, Roberto Picón, por parte de funcionarios del servicio de Inteligencia del Estado. El papa Francisco, en su alocución tras el rezo del Angelus de este domingo, pide una solución “pacífica” y “democrática” para el país. (Sumarium vía Efe, Actuall)

Trump vuelve a liarla en Twitter. El presidente de los Estados Unidos publicó este domingo en su perfil un vídeo-montaje en el que aparece él mismo en pleno combate de lucha libre golpeando a un contrincante cuya cabeza es el logotipo de CNN. Las reacciones fueron inmediatas, y se movieron entre el estupor y el escándalo. Congresistas calificaron el tuit de “violento, falso, impropio de un presidente”. Ana Navarro, una comentarista republicana de la CNN, dijo en antena que el presidente Trump “debe dejar de comportarse como una niña mala”. Según Quartz, un diario progresista que se opone a todo lo que haga Trump, la fuente del tuit del presidente fue un “troll –acosador en redes sociales– racista”. [The New York Times, The Washington Post, El Blog de Carlos Alberto Montaner, Quartz, en inglés y en español)

Matrimonio homosexual: Austria vota “no”. El Parlamento austriaco rechazó la propuesta de los Socialdemócratas para reconocer el llamado “matrimonio igualitario”. En la misma semana, los parlamentos de Alemaniay Austria han votado sobre esta cuestión, con diferentes resultados. (Der Standard, Agenda Europe, Actuall, en alemán, inglés y español)

La sharia se instala en Suecia. Cada vez más barrios de Estocolmo están bajo la ley islámica. La Policía pide ayuda al Ejército para hacer cumplir la Constitución. (Tamara García Yuste, para Actuall)

Atentado en Damasco. Un coche bomba dejó al menos 20 muertos y 21 heridos este domingo, en el barrio de Al Dama, de la capital siria. Al mismo tiempo, en Iraq, un atentado suicida ha causado la muerte a catorce personas en el campamento de refugiados de Al Anbar, al oeste del país. (ABC, El Universo via France Press)

++++CISmógrafo electoral: Nueva entrega del CISmógrafo de Actuall, hoy con el foco en la brecha generacional. Las diferencias ideológicas entre jóvenes y mayores son más profundas que nunca. La movilización de los millennials desafía el bipartidismo. Tres millones de nuevos votantes están cambiando el parlamento, la agenda y la forma de hacer política. ¿Es una oportunidad o solo una barrera de entrada más para un nuevo partido que aspire a reagrupar el voto liberal-conservador en España? Lo analizamos en Generaciones separadas, dentro del Blog de la Redacción.

SELECCIÓN DE ACTUALL

Ideología de género: el nuevo telón de acero cae sobre Occidente, por Candela Sande. Observa la autora, en esta nueva columna para Actuall, que “Alemania ha cedido al lobby LGBT” al aprobar en el Parlamento, el pasado viernes, el reconocimiento del llamado “matrimonio igualitario”. “Solo los países del Este, los que sufrieron la bota soviética, siguen defendiendo la familia y la libertad frente a la ideología de género”, apunta Candela Sande.

Lo que debería aprender Rajoy sobre vida y familia en su viaje a Polonia, por Ana Fuentes. El presidente español acaba de visitar Polonia, con motivo de la XII Cumbre bilateral, y, de paso, para asistir a la final del campeonato europeo Sub-21 de fútbol. El Gobierno de Varsovia ha dado una lección sobre cómo es posible poner en marcha políticas de apoyo a la familia y reducción del aborto al menor número de la Unión Europea.

Menores a 60 dólares: así es el mercado humano de Estado Islámico, por Tamara García Yuste. Dentro de este mercado de seres humanos, se encuentran los yazidíes, una minoría religiosa perseguida con especial saña por los yihadistas. Lamiya Aji Bashar, premio Sajarov de los Derechos Humanos, ha reclamado ayuda a las instituciones internacionales para salvar a su pueblo del genocidio que está padeciendo.

CORRESPONDENCIA

Alfonso Maldonado, sacerdote en la Arquidiócesis de Barquisimeto, ha accedido a escribir unas crónicas sobre la evolución de la crisis constitucional en Venezuela, que se irán publicando en el Blog de la Redacción. Un testigo directo, lúcido y comprometido para contar el sufrimiento cotidiano de la población y los movimientos del Gobierno de Nicolás Maduro. No te pierdas su primera carta: “Venezuela: las pautas del caos”.

Estimados señores:

Después de leer la noticia sobre la sentencia del Tribunal de Estrasburgoque da la razón a los jueces británicos  en contra de la voluntad de los padres del pequeño Charlie Gard, me pregunto: ¿Para qué vale este Tribunal Europeo de Derechos Humanos? ¿Garante de qué Derechos Humanos es? ¿A quien protege? ¿Frente a quién?

La conclusión que se desprende, a la luz de esta sentencia, es que no vale absolutamente para nada. Más les valdría a todos esos señores irse a su casa. No sé por qué se empeñan los Estados en mantenter estas Instituciones que no valen de nada, solo se dedican a hacer daño.

Por otro lado, ¿Qué les queda a los padres? ¡Tiene que haber alguna salida para que a este inocente se le permita ir a recibir un tratamiento a los Estados Unidos!

¡No puedo comprender qué ganan los médicos y jueces haciendo tanto daño! 

¿Quiénes son ellos para no dejar a unos padres luchar por la vida de un hijo?

Atentamente,

Rocío

La ingeniería social nunca es liberal

"Los, a día de hoy, enemigos de la libertad son cortes de un trapo distinto al de los antiguos gobernantes reales e imperiales, o de aquellos que dirigieron el Sistema soviético; ellos usan un conjunto diferente de herramientas para forzarnos a la sumisión", según Victor Orbán, el 15 de marzo de 2016.

El que es primer ministro de Hungría se refería a la crisis de los llamados "refugiados" y la actitud del politburó bruselense al respecto. Sin embargo, estas palabras pueden aplicarse a otro tipo de censuras muy fomentadas por la dictadura de la corrección política.

El lobby LGTB, agente de la llamada "progre-inquisición", en torno a la cual se determina lo políticamente correcto, trata de poner todos sus esfuerzos en censurar toda crítica a la ideología de género y su imposición, basada en la ingeniería social (una variante del socialismo).

No solo se están conformando con la intimidación mediante calificativos como "homófobo", "retrógrado" e "intolerante" ni protestando contra actos públicos que rebatan los postulados del marxismo cultural. Están viendo cuasi alcanzada su ilusión de que esa censura se convierta en proyecto de ley.

Mediante legislaciones autonómicas, se ha comenzado a vulnerar derechos fundamentales como la libertad de expresión, la presunción de inocencia, la igualdad ante la ley (estas estrategias establecen la discriminación positiva) y la libertad de conciencia (también la religiosa). Pero está en proyecto una ley nacional que pretende reforzar los aspectos liberticidas de estas. 

Ahora bien, no solo es preocupante que todo el ‘mainstream’ político y mediático esté a favor del mismo, sino también esos visos, bien de esnobismo o de acomplejamiento (la típica actitud de "no querer líos") que se aprecian en nuestra sociedad.

Quienes defendemos la libertad del individuo frente al Estado no debemos limitarnos solo a pedir bajos impuestos y menos burocracia. No es menos grave que una bochornosa presión fiscal el ataque a la libertad de conciencia. La ingeniería social es también socialismo mientras que el verdadero conservadurismo es aquel cuyo alma es el liberalismo clásico.

A su vez, se recuerda que aquellos liberales de visión "progre" que, aparte de negar la herencia cristiana de Occidente, suscriben las reivindicaciones de estos lobbies son cómplices del uso del Estado contra nuestra libertad. El progresismo no es sino socialismo.

Ser un escéptico de la ideología de género no implica tener nada en contra de quienes son homosexuales ni falta de respeto alguna hacia estos. De hecho, hay gais moralmente conservadores, que se sentirán totalmente representados por asociaciones como HazteOir, que aplaudirán ciertos artículos de la Constitución de Hungría y las leyes del Estado de Texas en defensa de la familia natural, que se sentirán más afines a Orban, Andrzej Duda y Ted Cruz que a Cifuentes, Macron y Trudeau.

Igual que el "feminazismo" no representa a todas las mujeres, ni la fiesta del Orgullo (caracterizada por exhibicionismos y ciertos actos blasfemos) ni ninguna asociación homosexualista representan a todos los homosexuales.

Termino parafraseando a George Orwell, que dijo que decir la verdad sería un acto revolucionario.

Ángel Manuel García Carmona

B. Sc. Computer Engineering student 

Envíanos comentarios, pistas de noticias y críticas a info@actuall.com

Únete a nuestra conversación en Twitter y Facebook.

Que pases un buen fin día.

¡Hasta mañana!

La Redacción de Actuall.

La entrada El Brief: Unanimidad LGBT; Papa Francisco pide por Charlie Gard; Trump vuelve a liarla aparece primero en Actuall.


          India's best companies to work for 2017: SAP Labs India has cracked the millennial code   
Part of a connected network of 19 labs in 16 countries, the India centre is growing in strategic importance for the German enterprise software major.
          Reactie op Millennials hebben de verkeerde opvoeding gekregen door BertG.   
Zag het artikel gisteren staan en dacht nog, nee, dit is niks voor de site. Zo zie je maar weer, je weet het nooit. Maar ze heeft wel gelijk, zo zit deze hele generatie in elkaar. Zijn nooit gewend om tegen gesproken te worden, en anders worden ze boos. Ze hadden die corrigerende tik nooit moeten verbieden, dan was het misschien nog goed gekomen.
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          7/3/2017: INDUSTRIE & SERVICES: Millennials : les antisoixante-huitards   

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          The musical, millennial life of 'Baby Driver's' Ansel Elgort   
… was deep into a club music period when he found himself … action-musical "Baby Driver." (Sony/TriStar)Ever since the … for the young Elgort; electronic musicians like Avicii came into … someone else’s puzzle. But music, this is my puzzle. — …
          Here’s the latest brag for Chinese millennials: a selfie at the North Pole   
It appears Thailand and Hong Kong just aren’t fancy enough anymore for China’s ever-higher-spending millennials, according to travel industry experts, who say that increasing numbers are now scrambling in their thousands to more exotic locations, with the Nordic countries highest on many bucket lists. Some are even willing to venture to the North Pole itself for a bit of time off with a difference. Observers say they have noticed a rush in the number of selfies -- or self portraits...
          From print to VR and Data, how to reach young audiences today?   
JAKARTA, Indonesia, July 3, 2017 /PRNewswire/ -- While the printed newspaper's audience is aging and shrinking, news publishers are reaching today more readers and users than ever before on digital platforms. Providing a digital-first experience that connects with and engages a young audience nevertheless remains a challenge for legacy news media. To remedy this situation, WAN-IFRA, the World Association of Newspapers and news publishers, organises in Jakarta, on 5-6 July 2017, a Summit on New Content Formats for Millennials.
          Dari Media Cetak ke VR dan Data, Bagaimana Menjangkau Audiens Muda Terkini?   
JAKARTA, Indonesia, Juli 3, 2017 /PRNewswire/ -- Ketika audiens surat kabar semakin menua dan menciut jumlahnya, berbagai penerbitan pers (news publishers) kini tengah menjangkau lebih banyak pembaca dan pengguna pada sarana digital dari masa sebelumnya. Bagaimanapun juga, langkah menyajikan pengalaman digital-first yang menghubungkan dan melibatkan audiens muda adalah tantangan bagi media pemberitaan konvensional. Guna mengatasi kendala ini, WAN-IFRA, (World Association of Newspapers and News Publishers), mengadakan sebuah acara pertemuan dengan tema New Content Formats for Millennials di Jakarta, pada 5-6 Juli 2017.
          Hollywood doesn't know when to stop   
Lately, it seems a Hollywood fad to re-make classic films of the past (as if the addition of lots of flashy CGI could improve on already-great films, even with today's often sub-par scripts and actors). So what if the apes were more "realistic" in the 2001 version of "The Planet of the Apes?" It still sucked in comparison to the original. Hell, even Tom Cruise couldn't rescue the "War of the Worlds" remake. But, they keep trying, and perhaps one day they'll get it right.

However, it won't happen with the upcoming remake of "The Day the Earth Stood Still." This is one of my all-time favorite films, and Hollywood is getting ready to rape it.

First, they've cast Keanu Reeves as Klaatu. Are you kidding me? Is there any possible way that guy could begin to approach the poise and gravity Michael Rennie brought to that role?

Second, they've decided on a little plot change.

From the MTV Movies blog:

Fifty years later and Klaatu has a new message for humanity, but one with equally dire consequences should we choose to ignore it, Keanu Reeves, who is playing the alien in Scott Derrickson’s upcoming remake, told MTV News.

“The first one was borne out of the cold war and nuclear détente. Klaatu came and was saying cease and desist with your violence. If you can’t do it yourselves we’re going to do it. That was the film of that day,” Reeves explained. “The version I was just working on, instead of being man against man, it’s more about man against nature. My Klaatu says that if the Earth dies, you die. If you die, the earth survives. I’m a friend to the earth.”

While humanity still engages in a staggering number of international conflicts, the environmental message is one that, not only encompasses wars, and fights, and terrorism, but one that goes beyond constrictions to become a millennial message of “what we are doing and who we are as a species,” Reeves insisted. “We’re trying to reach beyond the idea of [just] environmentalism.”


Again, are you kidding me? Klaatu comes all the way to Earth to fight global warming?

From a commenter on the MTV Movies blog, with whom I wholly agree:

It’s amazing that someone is willing to take one of the first pioneering science-fiction movies and turn it, in the cheapest pornographic way, into a propaganda tool of the dumbest ideological fad of this decade. If I were a kid of the original creators, I would demand the execution of those who are humiliating the work of my parent in such a dramatic way.


Hear, hear. Sometimes the classics should be left alone.

Keanu Reeves Brings Different Message With Him In ‘Day The Earth Stood Still’
          #216: Cross the Memes   

This week, Jeff and Rebecca talk about the launch of Annotated, tastefully gloat about guessing Oprah's next book club selection, appreciate the bookishness of Sarah Jessica Parker, and much more. 

We hope you’ll check out the first episode of Annotated“Is It 1984 Yet?” It’s about the resurgence of interest in George Orwell’s 1984 and the story of how 1984 came to be in the first place.

The next five episodes in the series will come out every other week, and you can subscribe to Annotated in Apple PodcastsGoogle Play, or in your podcast player of choice.

Find out more about Annotated here

 

This episode is sponsored by:

OwlCrate

Leaving Lucy Pear by Anna Solomon

Libby

 

Links discussed in this episode:

New Oprah pick (we nailed it) 

Audiences at 1984 on Broadway vomiting & fainting

 Sarah Jessica Parker’s first acquisition for Hogarth imprint

Millennials most likely generation to use public libraries

Macmillan offers scholarships to professional development events for booksellers from marginalized backgrounds 

TSA testing new screening that requires removing books from packed bags

 LeVar Burton reads to us in his new podcast 

 

 


          United Church embraces startups as it updates its social mission to engage millennials    
In an attempt to reimagine its role in communities, the church is opening its doors to social enterprise

          Bartender/Bar Manager - Pane e Bene Restaurant LLC - Westport, CT   
Professional female bartender with some experience, a fan energetic person with upscale clientele and millennials client experience. High school or equivalent....
From Indeed - Tue, 27 Jun 2017 19:04:34 GMT - View all Westport, CT jobs
          Shilpa, Karisma, Disha: Who wowed in millennial pink?    
Take the poll and tell us which cover you liked best.
          The CEO of an investing startup taking in $12 million a day on the future of finance, millennials, and happiness   

jon stein ceo betterment 3

It took a year for the roboadviser Betterment to reach $10 million in assets under management.

That day, in 2011, was a big one for founder Jon Stein, 37, who set up the company after working at First Manhattan Consulting Group. He recalls going out to dinner that evening and being in awe of having so many people trust him and his company with their money. Now the company pulls in $12 million a day.

Betterment is the largest independent roboadviser in the world, with $9 billion under management and 270,000 customers. Betterment is currently valued at $700 million, according to a company spokeswoman.

Betterment provides financial advice online and via a smartphone app. Rather than using human managers to build portfolios, roboadvisers like Betterment use algorithms to determine where to invest. Global assets managed by robos could reach $13 trillion by 2025 in a best-case scenario, according to a group of equity analysts at Morgan Stanley. That would be up from $100 billion in December.

Betterment's growth has been impressive, but it still faces steep competition. The wealth-management space has caught on that roboadvisers are hot, and many big firms have rolled out their own robo offerings. Charles Schwab and Vanguard are two such giants with trillions of dollars in assets under management.

Stein is resolute in his belief, however, that those firms are rooted in the old way. Business Insider recently met up with Stein at Betterment's Manhattan office to talk about the company's journey, the future of wealth management and the firm, and happiness.

This interview has been edited for clarity and length.

Frank Chaparro: How's business?

Jon Stein: We have had an incredible run. We are the largest independent online financial adviser. And this has been a goal of ours since we started the company seven years ago. We just celebrated our seventh anniversary. We have grown something like 300% year-over-year for that entire time. When we first started out, it took us a year to get to $10 million assets under management. When we did, I couldn't believe it.

It took us another six months to get to $20 million. It then took us another three months to get to $30 million. We just kept growing faster and faster and faster. And today we bring in $10 million on an average day. Our business has changed a lot, in one sense. We are growing so well, and that growth is accelerating. And our offerings are much more sophisticated than when we started.

But in another sense, we are doing the same thing we have always been doing — that is, thinking about the customer and what the customer wants, and then building financial services in a way that actually responds to customer demands, which I think is not the way the old guard has done things. The old way just sells the product. The old way has the product they want to push. Our vision is that the service should be built around the customer and it should be very personalized. It should be built for their needs. It should be very convenient and strip away unnecessary complexities, and it should give them peace of mind.

robotChaparro: In February, Betterment rolled out an offering that would provide users with access to human financial advisers. It appears that the pure robo-only model is unsustainable and that firms have to go hybrid, with a bit of old and new. Was this the thought process behind the move?

Stein: Our goal, long-term, is to be our customers' central financial relationship. We want them to be able to manage everything in one place when they come to Betterment. We give them guidance about their full financial life with that holistic view. That's what customers want. They want that ability to manage everything in one place.

And that's why we rolled out Betterment Plus and Premium. We want to be able to answer any question our clients have. We want to make it clear to everyone that people can call us and get advice and guidance on any financial question. Just call us. I don't think we've been clear enough about that even today. I think there is more work to do. And I think you will see us over the course of the year rolling out better ways that make it really obvious that anyone can get financial advice here on anything. Because we have certified financial planners who are willing to answer any question.

Chaparro: It's been said that pure roboplatforms could face trouble if there is a downturn. Without that hand-holding and someone to talk to, investors might pull —

j00322_004_237Stein: Says who? I don't think that prop really resonates with customers.

If you talk to customers and ask them, "What do you want from your financial adviser?" They don't say, "We really want someone who is going to be there for me during a downturn." That's a very industry-oriented way of thinking about justifying your value as a financial adviser. It's not really what customers care about or want. They want performance. The reason they hire us is because we maximize their money. That is core to our value.

Convenience is another. They want it easy. They want it fast. They want transfers to happen quickly, and they want peace of mind. Peace of mind is related to the idea that you can talk to someone, but it is not actually "I want someone to hold my hand in a downturn." Rather, it is more like "I want to know that my financial adviser is on my side."

So Betterment is a fiduciary, so we work only for our customers. We only work in their best interest, and we always have. Charles Schwab can't say that. Schwab is a brokerage firm selling you a product. Vanguard can't say that. Vanguard is a mutual-fund supermarket. They do not care if you maximize your money because that's not their goal. That's not their objective function. Their objective function is to sell funds.

The old way doesn't really think about what is in the customer's best interest. So it is hard to get peace of mind that you are getting what is best for your money if that's not their goal.

Editor's note: We reached out to Vanguard and Charles Schwab to respond to Stein's comments.

  • Charles Schwab said: "Jon is wrong about his fiduciary point. All of Schwab's advisory services, including our roboadvisory service, Schwab Intelligent Portfolios, are fiduciary, which means we put our clients' interests first when giving advice."
  • Vanguard said: "As the industry's only client-owned asset manager, Vanguard is not only structured to serve our clients' best interest, but guided by the noble premise that an investment company should exist to make money for our clients — not from our clients."

Chaparro: What is your target demographic?

Stein: We look at our target customer as someone who is 35 to 55 years old with $100,000 to $2 million of investable assets. But we are open to everyone. We get a lot of people with less than that because we have no minimum balance. The folks with $10 million plus are well-served by private wealth managers and family offices. The folks in the $2 million to $10 million range are decently served. But people with less than that are just getting ripped off, and not getting a lot for the financial advice they pay for. So that's the market we serve best.

Chaparro: UBS put out a note last week about how the millennial generation is about to benefit from "one of the largest intergenerational wealth transfers in history." Do you view this as a tailwind for Betterment?

Stein: Definitely. I think every 30 or 40 years, historically, in this industry, there has been a new wave of technological change or regulatory change that brings about a new crop of firms that grow to be significant players in the space. I think the last time we saw this was with the growth of Vanguard and Schwab, which were both born in the 1970s. And it took them a long time to get scale. Probably about two decades.

We think we can accelerate that, and we are already growing faster than they did in the early days. We are also growing faster than mutual funds did in their early days, and we are growing faster than ETFs in their early days.

millennials festival friends fun

Chaparro: Why has that been possible?

Stein: With Betterment, it is obvious why you should switch from the old way. We do things for you that the other firms do not. For starters, we make you more money — more take-home returns than you can get anywhere else. That is the value that we provide.

The headwind to growth is that people hate to talk about finance. And there is a lot of inertia as a result. People feel like "I am probably not getting the most out of my money." They have doubts and are not confident in their money management, but they think that everything else is equally bad — everything is the same, essentially.

Our job is to open people's eyes that Betterment represents a generation shift — that it is a different way of thinking about your money and what it can do for you. We're not looking to tell people that they've been doing the wrong thing for the past 30 years, because they haven't. This didn't exist before. But now that it does, and they have to take advantage of it.

Chaparro: When we think about what matters to millennials, the things that come to mind are transparency, customer service, and performance. How does Betterment stack up on those fronts?

10000th Customer Group 2Stein: On every point, we win.

On performance, we do more to personalize the portfolio to meet your actual needs than anyone else. And that helps improve performance. We help improve your take-home returns through tax-loss harvesting, through dividend shielding, through intelligent rebalancing and other intelligent software.

On the theme of convenience, I'll call it — customer service, as you mentioned, is a part of that. That's a big piece. Being accessible and being able to answer questions is an integral component. But convenience also includes other things, such as having faster money movements and a faster sign-up process, and making it easier for customers to add beneficiaries to their account. We are better at all of those things. And that translates into a much better customer experience. I think we are much higher than the average. We are tied with Vanguard's levels of customer satisfaction.

And on transparency, that ties into our pillar of making sure our clients have peace of mind. Peace of mind is driven by, yes, understanding what you own and understanding how the service works. Having that level of comfort is very important. And we are very clear on all of that. But I also think peace of mind comes from knowing that your financial provider is working in your best interest. We are doing that in a way that others are not.

Chaparro: Morgan Stanley put out a big note on the future of fintech back in May in which they argued that "only a handful of roboadvice startups will survive." Those that don't survive will consolidate or be bought up by legacy firms. Do you think this is how things will play out?

Stein: It's the way things have gone in every other industry and during every other cycle in this industry. So I expect that is right. That doesn't mean there aren't going to be new ideas coming out and new competitors emerging for decades to come.

But we have to ask ourselves: How many of these players can actually make it to scale? In financial services, it is not many. How many big financial services brands have broken out in the last three decades? It is very few. What's the brand-new bank that has come along? There's none. What's the new investing firm that has broken out and taken a lot of share? There are a couple that I probably know of, but they're not on the public's radar. Maybe like Financial Engine or DFA.

There are a couple of firms that have gotten big, but they're not a huge name. PayPal did it. Capital One did it. But it's few. So I agree with their thesis: Few will survive, and there will be consolidation.

Bezos Amazon Chaparro: Incumbents have had their own robo offerings for years, and they have their big brand and infrastructure to back them up. What makes you so certain Betterment can survive up against such competition?

Stein: For the same reason why we often see those few innovators break out.

You could also ask "Why did Amazon break out and become the dominant online retailer?" — some would say dominant retailer period. And why wasn't it Barnes and Nobles, Target, or Walmart, or anybody else? It is because Amazon has a specific focus. They didn't have conflicts with a set of existing infrastructure and systems and people who were built around doing things the old way.

Morgan Stanley, for instance, is a firm set up to serve clients the old way. As a result, they are having a really hard time shifting to this new paradigm of pure customer alignment because that's not their model. Their model is brokerage alignment. It is a brokerage model. They are there to sell you a product, whatever product makes them the most money. That tends to be the one that they favor.

The DOL's fiduciary rule, which is now partially enacted, tries to eliminate those conflicts of interest under retirement accounts. We think every account should have an adviser that is aligned with customer interest. We think that is the future of the industry.

Editor's note: Morgan Stanley declined to comment on Stein's comments. The Wall Street giant has taken many notable steps to digitize its wealth-management offerings. As Business Insider's Matt Turner reported, the bank is planning to roll out a goals-based roboadviser option for the children of existing wealthy clients and for Morgan Stanley stock-plan participants.

Chaparro: Naturally, there are a lot of folks in wealth management and financial services who don't agree with the DOL's rule. How do you respond to folks who argue that it's bad for clients because it limits choice?

Stein: I think the industry will say and do anything it can to hang on to the old way. No one argues with the idea that about $20 billion will flow from financial industry profits to client wallets if the rule is enacted. Parties on both sides agree with that annual estimate. So is that a good thing? If you're on our side, then it is.

TechCrunchDisruptSummer2010 JS01

Chaparro: Is this model part of the reason why you left Wall Street?

Stein: I left Wall Street because I wasn't fulfilled with the idea that I could have a career by just helping banks sell more product and helping banks make more money. I wanted to be able to get closer to the customer and to build something that mattered, that made a difference in the world, that really changed the game. And I saw a bunch of opportunities to do that.

The most glaring one was investment management, where there had been no innovation from a customer perspective in decades, in my opinion. Maybe there had been innovation on the back end for the affluent. But for the mass-market customers, the side we tend to serve, there had been very limited improvement. And so much technological change has occurred.

I mentioned this idea that advice is core. That is an important part of our vision. If you believe in technology as much as we do, you then believe, for instance, that someday we will have self-driving cars. It is not a controversial thing to say that will probably happen. I think it is controversial, relatively, today that someday we will have self-managing wallets. You earn some money, and you have some preferences about how you want it saved and spent, and I believe your wallet will manage and optimize itself. You will have the right amount going into the right accounts, the right amount set aside for different needs. You can always change. Just like with a self-driving car, you can change your destination.

But all that optimization is happening for you, in a way that's aligning with your best interests. And as an adviser, we can build that future. A broker can't build that because that's not their core. A mutual-fund company can't do that. I think we are best positioned to be the financial-services firm of the future because we started with this vision of advice.

Chaparro: What's the next innovation you are excited about?

hbz 80s fashion 1986 gettyimages 499296983Stein: As far as future innovation is considered, I think we can stand out the most in personalization. We want to do more and more to give you a personalized index.

The idea that you should buy a fund with 5 million other people who are buying that fund, that is a very 1980s view of the world. Why? Because that's the only technology we could support at the time. Building indexes was hard and took a lot of math.

We can do so much better than that now. I can build you an index that takes into consideration your risk tolerance, your goals, your values and personal preferences about what kind of companies you want to invest in, and any changes that come up in your life. We can build you this separately managed index fund that will yield a higher performance. I think that's a very exciting lane.

Chaparro: As part of your strategy to target younger folks, I imagine you guys are constantly advertising on podcasts. Shifting gears a bit, do you listen to podcasts?

Stein: I do. I was driving over the weekend, and I just heard one of our ads. This weekend I was listening to "Reply All," "99% Invisible," and "StartUp." I listen to a lot of them.

Chaparro: What other hobbies do you have?

Stein: We have a garden on our deck. We've got tomatoes, cherries, strawberries, squash. In past years, we've had okra.

Chaparro: How did you get into gardening?

Stein: Also, I'm a big student of happiness and figuring out what makes us happy. Part of the reason why I started this company is I think having purpose and doing something with purpose is one of the key drivers of happiness — much more so than financial gain or money.

More money doesn't really make people happier. Having purpose and having peace of mind about your money makes us happy. Gardening is one of those things that is well-correlated with happiness. I just like the idea of it.

SEE ALSO: A 'paradigm shift' is taking place in financial technology

DON'T MISS: This is the future of financial advice

Join the conversation about this story »

NOW WATCH: THE BOTTOM LINE: Don’t worry about a tech bubble — worry about 1 million retail jobs instead


          Ghost Writer - Millennial & Employee Engagment Institute - Detroit, MI   
Obviously this will be hard work and doesn't involve finances on the front end so I'm super interested in us being the right fit to help create a long term win...
From Indeed - Thu, 01 Jun 2017 16:28:50 GMT - View all Detroit, MI jobs
          9 Stunning Insta-worthy Spots in Malaysia You Absolutely Have to Visit   

The post 9 Stunning Insta-worthy Spots in Malaysia You Absolutely Have to Visit appeared first on WORLD OF BUZZ. By continuing publishing our materials, you have knowingly infringed our intellectual property and copyrights by reproducing WORLD OF BUZZ contents without any prior written consent from the media owner. This case will be escalated into a legal action should the content remains on this site.

As millennials, we all love to travel and explore new places but did you know that we don’t have to go far to get that perfect Instagram shot? In fact, you’ll be surprised by the amount of Instagrammable places that Malaysia has to offer! So, before you start planning that overseas trip, perhaps you should consider […]

The post 9 Stunning Insta-worthy Spots in Malaysia You Absolutely Have to Visit appeared first on WORLD OF BUZZ. By continuing publishing our materials, you have knowingly infringed our intellectual property and copyrights by reproducing WORLD OF BUZZ contents without any prior written consent from the media owner. This case will be escalated into a legal action should the content remains on this site.


          Full Time Stock Broker / Financial Advisor Trainee Program | Stock Broker   
Network - New York City, NY - Financial Services remains one of the fastest growing fields in finance with dwindling competition - a recipe for success, IF you're the right candidate. Allied Millennial Partners is hiring the "Next Generation of Independent Financial Advisors." Stock Broker Trainees will go through our comprehensive training program. New Advisors…
          Full Time Stock Broker / Financial Advisor Trainee Program | Stock Broker   
Network - New York City, NY - Financial Services remains one of the fastest growing fields in finance with dwindling competition - a recipe for success, IF you're the right candidate. Allied Millennial Partners is hiring the "Next Generation of Independent Financial Advisors." Stock Broker Trainees will go through our comprehensive training program. New Advisors…
          Full Time Stock Broker / Financial Advisor Trainee Program | Stock Broker   
New York City, NY - Always be on the alert for potentially fraudulent job postings online - never send money to a potential employer. Share Description Job Description Financial Services remains one of the fastest growing fields in finance with dwindling competition - a recipe for success, IF you're the right candidate. Allied Millennial Partners…
          Local government needs millennial participation   

Seated in the back of the Baltimore City Council’s chambers, wearing shorts and T-shirts — a bit underdressed for the occasion, perhaps — I watched as two of my friends from high school took in their first City Council meeting, dutifully tracking the progress of every bill and resolution being...


          Is DexYP the Consolidator That Local Has Been Waiting for?   
On the brand side, the challenge DexYP will face is reinventing the brand to be relevant for today’s younger business owners. Millennial entrepreneurs attach no value whatsoever to the Yellow Pages brand and history.
          Un tuitero triunfa con esta lista de los '7 pecados digitales'   

Twitter es un lugar lleno de talento y de humor. Prueba de ello es este tuit en el que se hace una nueva versión de 7 pecados capitales: lujuria, gula, avaricia, pereza, ira, envidia y soberbia.

El usuario Guarromántico ha elaborado una nueva lista adaptada a los nuevos tiempos en el que se asocia un pecado capital con un pecado digital.

En esta enumeración aparecen la plataforma de vídeo bajo demanda Netflix, las redes sociales Instagram, Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn; la aplicación de ligar Tinder y la web de compras Amazon.

Esta nueva lista podría aparecer en una hipotética Biblia del Millennial. El tuit, que lleva publicado menos de un día, tiene más de 1.700 retuits y más de 2.800 me gusta.

¿Cuántos de estos pecados digitales has cometido?

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          Where the millennials leave their mark   
When the ‘galleries’ and ‘auditoriums’ come to the IT Corridor, they will be significantly different from anything we have known
          Oh My Breadsticks! Olive Garden May Soon Deliver Through Amazon Prime   

A post shared by 😏 (@mcarroll80) on

Olive Garden might soon be delivering its comforting dishes through Amazon's affordable and fast Prime membership. On June 27, Olive Garden's parent company announced that it's embarked on a new partnership with Amazon that may entail a delivery feature.

Darden Restaurants is a multibrand company that oversees various widely recognized restaurants such as LongHorn Steakhouse, Bahama Breeze, and Capital Grille - in addition to Olive Garden. During a recent conference call, CEO Gene Lee said the company is exploring the partnership while also still maintaining its brand.

"We constantly sit around here thinking about how does Amazon have an impact on our business," he said. Though we can envision the delivery option being hugely successful, Lee said that millennials are still enjoying dining out. "I know you don't think millennials want to go to restaurants, but 30 percent of our guests are millennials versus 24 percent of the population. So we over indexed."

That being said, Darden Restaurants will continue to explore the possibility with Amazon. "The only way Amazon is in our world right now is through Amazon Prime delivery. We have a test going on with them. We'll continue to partner with them and see if we can make that work," he said.

In the meantime, the company is eyeing a third-party delivery service with various vendors - although Amazon likely has the most sway, especially since its recent acquisition of Whole Foods.


          Se le está acabando el tiempo al anuncio televisivo de 30 segundos   

Un formato narrativo diseñado para las pausas comerciales televisivas no funciona en línea.

Uno de los ganadores de la semana pasada en la premiación de los Cannes Lions, el festival anual de autocongratulación de la industria publicitaria, fue un anuncio para una nueva maquinilla de afeitar de Gillette diseñada para que los cuidadores rasuren a los ancianos. El anuncio de la agencia Grey New York es una conmovedora narración exquisitamente filmada; también tiene tres minutos de duración.

He allí el problema existencial de la industria de la publicidad. ¿Quién va a dedicar tres minutos a ver un anuncio de vídeo en línea durante estas épocas de capacidad de concentración cada vez más limitada? ¿Quién siquiera permite que un anuncio de 30 segundos esté en la pantalla hasta el final sin hacer clic tan pronto como sea posible en la casilla tentadoramente marcada con la frase “Saltar anuncio”?

El anuncio de 30 segundos paga por muchos de los yates alquilados y de las fiestas costosas en Cannes, y realza la afirmación de la industria de ser tan creativa como Hollywood, aunque en formatos más cortos. “La empresa de la televisión ha creado cientos de miles de millones de dólares en valor”, declaró entusiasmadamente Jeffrey Katzenberg, el ex director ejecutivo de DreamWorks Animation.

Pero los anuncios tradicionales están en dificultades. A finales de este año, Google dejará de permitir que se muestren en YouTube a menos que se puedan omitir y, en su lugar, está impulsando el uso de un nuevo formato de seis segundos, conocido como un “bumper”. El formato narrativo diseñado para las pausas entre programas de televisión no funciona en línea.

Esto es parte de una crisis más amplia en la industria de la publicidad en línea, a pesar de las celebraciones en Cannes. El descubrimiento en marzo de que los anuncios se estaban publicando junto a vídeos de contenido ofensivo en YouTube llevó a empresas como AT&T y L’Oréal a eliminar los anuncios de YouTube y de sitios vendidos a través de la red publicitaria de Google.

Se suponía que la distribución automatizada de anuncios destacados en línea a través de intercambios y redes traería consigo una eficiencia incalculable. En lugar de difundir sus anuncios a audiencias de masas, los promocionadores llegarían a nichos precisos de acuerdo a su demografía y a su comportamiento en línea. La realidad es un desastre: anuncios inadecuados que aparecen en sitios de baja calidad, e irritados espectadores que se los saltan.

Esta carrera hacia el fondo no beneficia a nadie. Las tarifas de la publicidad en línea han disminuido, empobreciendo a los editores y a las emisoras; los anunciantes no pueden llegar a un nuevo público con fiabilidad. Vice Media, el grupo digital que se centra en los millennials, está valorado en US$5.7 mil millones, demostrando el valor de cualquier marca que distribuya publicidad a la ‘generación en línea’.

La dificultad para anunciantes como Procter & Gamble y como Unilever se evidencia en los números. La publicidad en Internet superó a la publicidad por televisión el año pasado, pero la mayoría de los gastos en línea se destinaron al marketing de búsquedas. Los anunciantes dependen de la televisión para mostrar anuncios: ellos gastaron sólo US$9 mil millones en anuncios de vídeo en línea en EEUU, en comparación con US$71 mil millones en anuncios de televisión estadounidense, según la firma de contabilidad PwC.

“Lo que el espectador quiere y lo que el anunciante considera como ‘calidad’ a menudo no son lo mismo”, señaló recientemente el Group M, el grupo de compra de medios de WPP. Se estima que los grandes anunciantes que pagan el 90 por ciento de los anuncios televisivos contribuyen sólo entre el 30 y el 40 por ciento del gasto publicitario en línea. Ellos prefieren el anuncio de 30 segundos y el espacio que ocupa.

De ahí el leve pánico en Cannes. Michael Kassan, el director ejecutivo de la consultora MediaLink, habló de “el caos en la intersección del marketing, la tecnología y la publicidad que está provocando noches en vela”. Sheryl Sandberg, la directora de operaciones de Facebook, hizo un llamamiento para crear material cautivador con el fin de lograr que una impaciente audiencia móvil haga una pausa y vea el contenido.

Ahora consideremos al Sr. Katzenberg, quien vendió DreamWorks Animation a NBCUniversal por US$3.8 mil millones en 2016, y viajó a Cannes la semana pasada con su nueva idea. Como veterano de películas de Hollywood y de programas televisivos de enormes presupuestos, él ve los escasos valores de producción y las bajas tarifas publicitarias de numerosos vídeos digitales con una consternación que raya en desprecio.

Él quiere más bien crear una “nueva TV”, un formato de unos cinco a diez minutos para dramas y entretenimiento en línea a los que los estudios les dedicarían presupuestos similares a los de los programas televisivos. Al gastar US$100,000 por minuto, en vez de los US$1,000 que se consideran costosos en línea, los estudios podrían contratar escritores y actores estrella para miniprogramas que pudieran “hacer que los televidentes digan ‘¡guau, me encanta esto!’”.

El Sr. Katzenberg obtiene inspiración del autor Dan Brown, cuyo ‘golpe maestro’ fue cortar “El código Da Vinci” en capítulos cortos que una audiencia de masas pudiera fácilmente digerir. Además, él presenta el ejemplo de Charles Dickens, quien dividió sus novelas en ‘episodios’ publicados en revistas.

Él insiste en que los productores y los escritores están entusiasmados con su idea, lo cual no es sorprendente dado el hecho de que todo el mundo prefiere enormes presupuestos en vez de los modestos.

Pero mucho se basa en algo que aún no se ha ideado: un robusto sucesor de los anuncios de 30 segundos. El comercial de la maquinilla de afeitar de Gillette es casi lo suficientemente largo como para calificar de “nueva TV” por sí mismo, y sería difícil colocar un anuncio publicitario en un programa de siete minutos sin perder a irritados espectadores.

¿Qué salvará a la publicidad del caos? En Cannes la semana pasada, era fácil conocer a gente que hacía la pregunta y muy difícil encontrar a alguien con una respuesta convincente. El anuncio de 30 segundos fue una invención perfecta para su época; los creativos deben crear otra.

Por John Gapper (c) 2017 The Financial Times Ltd. All rights reserved


          The musical, millennial life of 'Baby Driver's' Ansel Elgort   
… was deep into a club music period when he found himself … action-musical "Baby Driver." (Sony/TriStar)Ever since the … for the young Elgort; electronic musicians like Avicii came into … someone else’s puzzle. But music, this is my puzzle. — …
          Bartender/Bar Manager - Pane e Bene Restaurant LLC - Westport, CT   
Professional female bartender with some experience, a fan energetic person with upscale clientele and millennials client experience. High school or equivalent....
From Indeed - Tue, 27 Jun 2017 19:04:34 GMT - View all Westport, CT jobs
          Millionaire   
Millionaires, and being a millionaire is a group that most of us wish we could be a part of. Well. my guest today, on the Steve Jobs inspired Join Up Dots free podcast interview is a man who has quite the ride to where he is now, as an author, business owner and on a mission to help the world shift their mindset to one of abundance. Get us all to be millionaires His early days were not as anyone would want for a child growing up. A survivor of a childhood riddled with domestic violence and alcoholism in the rural foothills of southern Virginia, he worked hard to throw of the mental chains that had covered him, to become the millennial CEO and founder of executive consulting firm, Excel Global Partners (EGP) and the Fund Managing Principal of the EGP Family of Companies. It has taken grit and persistence to get his award-winning firm, Excel Global Partners, to the position where it has served multi-billion dollar and mid-market clients in 20 states and in more than 16 countries across the world. But as we say this wasn't just a case of someone deciding to do things in a different way and then magic occurring. He has to master his habits, routines, and consciousness to train his mindset to shift from the poverty consciousness that he learned as a child to an abundance consciousness as an adult– and by doing so, became a multimillionaire. Today, he is having more fun than ever living the life of a purposeful millionaire with global reach. But this is probably the bit that I Love most about his story. For almost a decade, he quietly grew his business and his own personal development before ever setting out to coach or motivate anyone else, which believe me in today's world of "Hey i've just quit my job and now I'm a coach...come work with me", rarely ever happens. His book, The Purposeful Millionaire, is a best-selling guidebook of 52 rules that teaches people about mastering the millionaire mindset and getting the most out of life–doing more, living more, and achieving more! So is it the traumas in life, like the near drowning incident whilst kayaking the things that have taught him so much, or the everyday occurrences that most people just ignore, as well....living life? And where could he imagine being today if he hadn't started working on what was going on inside, before ever trying to master the world outside? Well let's find out as we bring onto the show to start joining up dots, with the one and only Mr James Nowlin Show Highlights During the show we discussed such weighty topics with James Nowlin such as: James shares how he has managed to get to his life to an eight on the happiness scale, and the steps he has taken to live this on a daily basis. James recalls how he had finally started to get the success once he had grasped that he had to learn more o then earn more. Self development is key for the progress he wanted. Why James believes that structuring your day with routines, gratitude and fitness regimes to really set yourself up for success in your business. So many people fail as they let themselves walk headfirst into burnout instead of doing the right work inside. and lastly…. Why pivoting in ones life is the key to gaining success. Nobody can expect to gain a foot on the right path straight out of the gate. But try things and you will find the thing that feels right.
          Maak indruk op millennials: 6 manieren om ze te bereiken met online video   
Met video kun je het verschil maken: mensen raken en tot actie aanzetten. In een wereld waar het vertrouwen extreem laag is én er om de aandacht van de millennial gevochten wordt, blijft video als één van de weinige kanalen overeind. Hoe raak je deze generatie met online video? Helft van de marketeers is met video bezig […]
          'Kittenfishing', 'mooning'... and 15 other millennial dating terms you've probably never heard of   
none
          Why Slow Fashion Is Picking Up The Pace   
"Buy Well, Choose Well; Make it Last" [Dame Vivienne Westwood]


2017-06-27-1498581878-7396016-Fullpagephoto.jpg
Skunkfunk SS17


The Shift in Gear

Fast food; Slow food. Fast fashion; Slow fashion. It can be hard to stay in sync with the pace of life. There's no question that this shift in gear reflects a new age in conscious consumerism. Nowhere is this more apparent than in fashion, where the philosophy of 'buy less, buy better' has acquired popular kudos. Fashion has always had activism in its DNA, so it was only a matter of time before the industry came clean, especially following the Rana Plaza disaster.

And, for the socially self-conscious cynics out there - unsure whether being virtuous might compromise their cool-rankings or, heaven-forbid, their Instagram followers - get this: when high priests of hedonism Liam Gallagher and Harry Styles profess to 'being good', we know that good has become hip. The 1D heartthrob says "I don't drink much", while the Mancunian music legend - told Jo Whiley at Glastonbury that "I'm taking care of myself nowadays [...] and I'm feeling good".

Back to fashion. The fastest growing conscious consumer sector, which grew by 72% in 2010, ethical fashion only continues to pick up pace. "A fabulous beautifully made jacket is not going to disappear out of fashion next year", says the premium British designer Amanda Wakely. Meanwhile, Safia Minney MBE, founder of People Tree, and a leading campaigner on trade policies, is also the author of 'Slow Fashion: Aesthetics meets Ethics', now considered a bible for the Slow Fashion movement.

The Fashion Revolution

If fashion buyers want SS18 trends, they may well be surprised. "Sustainability or responsible innovation is by far the biggest trend in the industry right now," says Eva Kruse, chief executive of Global Fashion Agenda, which organises the Copenhagen Fashion Summit, though it was Sir Martin Sorrell who coined the phrase "doing good is good business" back in 2010. That London ethical based brand Gandys - founded by the Forkan brothers under their 'Orphans for Orphans' initiative with flip-flops - recently launched its first womenswear collection, is also revealing.

It also coincides with the move upmarket for Thought Clothing - formerly Braintree Clothing. Over the past 18 months, this ethical brand has been repositioning with the aim of sitting alongside more contemporary brands such as Toast and Mint Velvet.

Total ethical spending in the UK is now worth £54billion (2016) and represents around 7% of all UK consumer spending, which is more than we spend on cigarettes and alcohol, combined. The value of overall ethical sales grew by 8 %to £38billion in 2015, during a period when inflation barely rose above 0.5 %, according to the new Ethical Consumer Markets report.

Sustainable Style

Looking at the fashion specifically - valued at £28bn in the UK - is fascinating. Throughout 2017 the British Fashion Council has been celebrating Positive Fashion best practice, creating a dialogue and providing a platform to tell good news stories that help facilitate change.
The militant ethical activism of figures such as Vivienne Westwood and Zandra Rhodes has filtered down to the ever-demanding Gen Z, now buying into H&M's 'Conscious Collection', albeit sometimes unwittingly, which arguably is just the point. As a language and mindset, sustainability is one in which we have become fluent.

For a long time, conscious consumers have felt neglected. 'Why must ethical, affordable and fashion each be mutually exclusive?' seems to sum up the widespread grievance. The raw reality for well-intentioned retailers is this: shoppers buy on design and style first. Sustainable fashion needed to catch up and the demand needed to be there.

Sustainable has now got stylish and affordable. There are signs that people are buying less but buying better - Mintel found this was true for 69% of women aged 25-44 - but even so, saving up for a piece from, say, Stella McCartney - however beautiful and ethically-made - is beyond the budgets of most people, which is why the democratisation of ethical fashion is such a fabulous thing.

The Green Generation

So, who's buying into the ethical market? Well, apparently it's the Millennials and a good fistful of folks either side.

A report on the shopping habits of Millennials says 70% indicate a willingness to spend more with brands that support ethical causes. In his book Who Cares Wins: Why Good Business is Better Business, David Jones, argues that the Millennial demographic are "the most socially responsible generation that ever existed" and dubs this influential, marketing savvy set as "pro-sumers".

What I find especially interesting here is two things. Firstly, how going green has gone mainstream and cloaked itself in coolness. It's quite likely that a blazer or dress that catches your eye in store, for its on-trend appeal, will be made from organic cotton, hemp or recycled leather using a zero-waste design. Moreover, the organic, ethical fair-trade whimsical purchase you make is off-the-shoulder blouse or tailored blazer than the proverbial sackcloth. This has certainly been the case for contemporary womenswear brand Skunkfunk, family owned and designed in Bilbao and distributed to UK retailers by Love Brands Ltd. Their collections, 50% ethically sourced, bring technical outerwear and innovative fabrics to womenswear, even involving regional artists to design original prints. Besides tracing their supply chain back to the source, this GTOS certified Fairtrade fashion brand uses a unique pattern cutting processing which aims for Zero Waste. The fashion fascist no longer needs to compromise on aesthetics to be virtuous.

But the real point here really is that, as consumers, we want to do this. We want to be 'good'. Being 'good' has become something of a status symbol and something we demand from brands and businesses. Importantly, it's also become an affordable desire to satisfy. We no longer need to drive a Prius or own a Canada Goose parka. This is far from greenwashing. It's an authentic and commercial decision made by retailers who are responding to consumer demand. How exciting is that?

This leads me to the second striking detail. Not only has ethical become affordable but the availability and supply and choice is fuelling the increased demand, 54% of consumers today, according to Unilver. Kevin Chesters, chief strategy officer at Ogilvy & Mather London says "The shift has definitely come from consumers demanding more transparency and more responsibility from retailers".

Of course, pace is only one quality of the ethical movement, which has shed its hippy status, been endorsed by celebrities ranging from Leonardo di Caprio to Emma Watson and is now manifesting itself in directional fashion. There was a time when only the premium brands were singing this tune, but now we're all humming along and conscious clothing has become very catchy. Given time, it may just become a No1 hit.

-- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.


          10 Cities Where Millennials Are Buying Homes (& 10 Where They Aren't)   
Millennials are increasingly becoming homeowners, but in some cities more than others.
          How to Turn Anyone Into an "Instagram Boyfriend"   

I'm a visual person and I always have been. I learn visually and make memories visually, so while you can joke that I'm a typical millennial who can't live in the moment or without my phone, it's probably true and I have an Instagram feed full of beautiful memories to show for it.

I'm all for a vacation with minimal phone service and an itinerary full of hiking and nature, but let's be real, I'm still coming back with an album's worth of photos that I'll cherish forever to remember the exact moment I asked a stranger, "Can you take my photo? Great. This is EXACTLY how I want it to look."

Thus my concern when heading off on a 10-day trek with my significant other. Before we even left the States, I warned him that I'd be asking him to take my picture a lot. And while he assured me that he'd taken photography classes in college, I wasn't convinced that he knew what he was getting himself into.

So, I took it upon myself to use our six-hour flight as the perfect crash course to turn my seemingly average boyfriend into the mythical Instagram boyfriend. *cue spotlights and angel choir* There are five very important things an Instagram boyfriend looks for when taking your photo: good lighting, a clean and nondistracting background, a flattering angle, an eye for any awkward poses, and the capacity to fit your whole outfit into the shot (major key).


          Millennials on the move: Despite obstacles, younger homebuyers now dominating real estate market   
According to reliable research, as well as the experience and expertise of local real estate agents, millennials are, in fact, purchasing homes, regardless of their choice of breakfast food. Forget unmotivated and foolish; instead, millennial homebuyers ...
          The outcomes and experiences of Early Millennials as young adults   
A new Statistical Analysis Report examines the early adulthood milestones achieved by 2002 high school sophomores, including educational attainment, family formation, and employment. Approximately 96 percent of 2002 high school sophomores had completed high school, 84 percent had made the transition to postsecondary education, and one-third had earned a bachelor’s or higher degree by 2012.
          Of Amazon, Wal-Mart And Millennials?   
none
              
7/3/17 Day 51 Today I have to make a hard choice. I know it's the right one but that still doesn't make it any less difficult. Growth leads to change in your life. If you're not changing, you're not growing. Growth hurts but it's only a temporary pain and ultimately will put you closer to your goal. Trust the process. QOTD : In what areas are you growing? #timeforhashtags ----------------------------------------------------------- #learning #instadaily #instablog #grow #growth #pain #trail #perseverance #fightthrough #choices #choice #gettingcloser #newpost #los #lifebycooks#entrepreneur #urbanentreprenuer #millennial #grind #hustlelife #hustlemode #grindlife #ivegottoleave
          Happy Birthday Neil Simon   
Tomorrow is Neil Simon’s 90th birthday.

As you know, I’m a big fan. I even hosted the TCM month long salute to him, and his movies aren’t even his best work.

It’s been quite a few years now since his last play so he’s been out of the public eye. And I wonder how many young people even know who he is. When 23-year-old Dodger phenom Cody Bellinger didn’t know who Jerry Seinfeld was, you really have to assume a large portion of the youth population has no clue who Neil Simon is. If anything, he’s that guy who has a Broadway theater named after him that is currently showing CATS.
If Millennials don’t know, I can understand it (kind of, sort of). But if you’re a Millennial TV comedy writer and you get him confused with the dude who walked on the moon – shame on you.

There is much to be learned by studying Neil Simon.

His plays are all published; there are even a few collections. Read them. Yes, some are a little dated. Many were written fifty years ago. But the crafting of characters, the ease with which his jokes all move the story forward and all come out of attitude – that’s just brilliant writing in any era.

And despite the changes in society and sensibilities over the last half-century, many of his plays continue to work. His jokes still get huge laughs today. That’s an achievement.

I’m not saying Millennials should write in his style. You have your own voice and your own sensibilities. But the structure, the way the jokes are crafted, the flow of dialogue, the way the scenes are built to maximize the comic potential – these are all worth studying. And enjoying.  It's not like I'm asking you to read GRAPES OF WRATH.  

So Happy Birthday, Doc. May you enjoy your 90’s... and maybe put something better than CATS in your theater.
          12 money-saving tips for millennial travelers   

Backpacking or low-budget traveling is becoming popular among millennials. With the rise of low-cost airlines and the emergence of inexpensive and sometimes practically free accommodations, traveling has never been more accessible. A budget, however, should always be set. So aside from waiting for seat sales to happen, I ...

          Modeexpertin erklärt den Modetrend, den deutsche Fußball-Spieler in diesem Sommer besonders gerne tragen   

Mats Hummels trägt ihn. Marco Reus auch. Und Loris Karius wurde auch schon darin gesehen. Der Blouson ist zu einem beliebten Kleidungsstück der deutschen Fußball-Stars geworden.

Hello ❤ #MarcoReus #mrxi #teamReus #Marcinho #MatsHummels

Ein Beitrag geteilt von fanpage for Roman&Marco🇨🇭🇩🇪🇫🇷 (@romanburki3811) am 2. Jul 2017 um 2:27 Uhr on

Das Signifikante an der Trend-Jacke sind die elastischen Bündchen an den Ärmeln und dem unteren Abschluss. Zu Blouson-Jacken zählen unter anderem College-, Bomber- und Trainingsjacken, die im Sommer in leichten, fließenden Materialien erhältlich sind. Es gibt sie sowohl für Herren, als auch für Damen.

Athleisure ist der Modetrend 2017

Die Jacke sieht elegant und sportlich zugleich aus — und steht damit für den großen Modetrend des Jahres 2017: „Athleisure“, eine Zusammensetzung aus den Wörtern „Athletic“ (sportlich) und „Leisure“ (Freizeit). Also sportliche Kleidung, die auch in der Freizeit getragen werden kann.

„Unter Athleisure fallen sportlich-bequeme Kleidungsstücke, die Design-Anspruch und Funktionalität haben. Dazu gehören beispielsweise sportliche Blousons, Bomberjacken, Jogginghosen und T-Shirts aus hochwertigen Materialien“, sagt Modebloggerin Jill Asemota im Gespräch mit Business Insider. Asemota berät auch Fußball-Spieler wie Jérôme Boateng in Modefragen und weiß, was die deutschen Stars tragen. Neben Blousons sind das in diesem Sommer nach Asemota auch Sakkos zu T-Shirts, Sweatpants und Sneakern.

Den Athleisure-Look können auch Frauen tragen. Hier trägt ihn Jill Asemota.

#crownheights #brklyn #calabasas🌹

Ein Beitrag geteilt von Jill Asemota (@jill_asemota) am 29. Apr 2017 um 4:42 Uhr on

Schweinsteiger, Hummels und Pirlo tragen schon den Style

„Athleisure ist nicht nur ein Trend, sondern ein Lebensgefühl, das dem aktuellen Zeitgeist entspricht. Männer möchten sich in ihren Kleidern wohlfühlen und tragen gerne bequeme, sportlich-elegante Teile“, so Asemota.

Laut der Fashion-Bloggerin haben Fußballer wie Bastian Schweinsteiger, Mats Hummel, Andreas Pirlo und Loris Karius bereits verstanden, worum es bei diesem Trend geht — und beweisen ein gutes Händchen. „Sie setzen auf dezente Kleidungsstücke, kombinieren nie mehr als 2 bis 3 Farben miteinander und wissen, welche Teile ihnen besonders gut stehen.“

Denn das Wichtigste bei Athleisure ist: Man soll sich darin wohlfühlen. „Klassische Dresscodes verlieren an Bedeutung. Wichtig ist qualitativ hochwertige Mode, die möglichst funktionell, aber trotzdem modern und trendy ist“, sagt Asemota.

Klickt euch durch die Galerie, um die Fußball-Stars im Athleisure-Look zu sehen: 

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Kevin Trapp

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Julian Draxler

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Leon Goretzka ...

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Den Rest der Story gibt es auf Business Insider Deutschland
          Primeira Impressão   
Melodrama
Lorde



Com a diferença de apenas algumas semanas o mundo da música viu os dois lado de uma mesma moeda chamada pop: de um lado o grande tropeço criativo e comercial de uma já consolidada diva pop e do outro a consagração de uma ainda iniciante cantora com o seu segundo álbum que entra para a história recente do pop como um dos trabalhos mais aclamados da critica especializada. Acredito que essa segunda cantora vocês todos já sabem quem é: a neozelandesa Lorde que com o seu inesperado Melodrama se transforma na voz de uma geração que ainda nem sabe muito bem quem são ainda, mas que já tem muito sobre o que falar. 

Melodrama é, essencialmente, um álbum sobre corações quebrados, ilusões amorosas e amores despedaçados. Temas tão recorrentes no mundo da música como o nosso arroz com feijão no almoço, mas que na perspectiva de Lorde ganha contornos modernos, descolados e com uma linguagem completamente avant-garde. As composições em Melodrama são como roteiros de filmes indies feitos por jovens diretores/roteiristas na casa dos vintes anos que tem a intenção de relatar a vida dos seus similares (e eles também) da maneira que as mesmas estão se passando atualmente sob a luz dessa sociedade que ainda não sabe muito o que fazer com esses millennials. Apesar disso, as letras criadas para o álbum possuem uma profundidade desconcertante, mostrando que existe muito mais do que a aparência de tecnológicos e com uma inquietação incontrolável nesse grupo: velhos e poderosos sentimentos, mas emolduradas de maneiras bem diferentes. Boa parte dessa qualidade vem do fato de Lorde ter-se unido com o compositor/produtor Jack Antonoff que adicionou uma experiência imprescindível para o trabalho final. Não são letrar que vão encontrar um público exatamente muito grande, mas que acerta precisamente o público para que é destinado. Um belo exemplo disso é a ótima Supercut sobre como fantasiamos sobre como é um relacionamento, mas que, na verdade, é tudo completamente diferente na realidade. Para poder expor tudo isso que as letras falam, Lorde se torna literalmente uma voz que representa uma geração.

Completamente única no quesito timbre, a jovem de apenas 20 anos encontrou uma persona vocal que a coloca em um posto muito parecido com o da Amy Winehouse: pode até haver pessoas parecidas, mas nada será comparada exatamente com o original. A forma com a cantora "ataca" cada nota é deliciosamente inusitado, estranho, descontraído, original, desconstruído e, em alguns momentos, até parece "errado" para quem ouve pela primeira vez ou que não curte a cantora. Seja como for a sua percepção não há como negar que ouvir dez segundos de qualquer canção na voz da Lorde já o bastante para saber quem está cantando. Ouça a cativante dark Sober e me diga que não estou certo? Impossível. O ponto de "discórdia", ao menos para mim, é a sonoridade como um todo de Melodrama: não que o indie pop/electropop maduro e contagiante não seja um ótimo trabalho, ainda mais com todas as nuances e ideias que Antonoff e outros produtores adicionam ajudando a criar uma sonoridade coesa e bastante divertida. Todavia, o resultado final é, resumidamente, seguro demais, pois não apresenta de realmente muito novo e quebrado de barreiras. Digo e repito: sonoramente extremamente bem produzido, mas não vai muito mais longe do que já ouvimos por aí. Outros momentos de destaques do álbum ficam por conta Perfect Places, The Louvre e Liability. Melodrama não é o álbum perfeito, mas é perfeito para essa geração e, principalmente, perfeito para colocar Lorde no top do mundo top, mesmo ela própria não se considerando uma diva pop.


          They Don’t Spend Like They Used to   

Millennials are spending more than any other generation on their vices. With dwindling inventory and rising home prices, how will they get their foot in the homeownership door?

The post They Don’t Spend Like They Used to appeared first on DSNews.


          Millennial: A Podcast Review   
I feel like I don’t have time for anything. Working two jobs (one full-, one part-time), leaving tim